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Nanocarrier system for detecting prosthesis loosening

A recent study has demonstrated that doctors may soon have a tool for identifying orthopedic prostheses that are becoming loose after total joint replacement surgery, the most common reason joint replacements fail. The study shows that a minute molecule designed with novel properties can be used to identify patients who are at risk for failure and potentially deliver drugs to stop this process.

Posted: Apr 28th, 2011

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Sweet chemistry: Carbohydrate adhesion gives stainless steel implants beneficial new functions

A new chemical bonding process can add new functions to stainless steel and make it a more useful material for implanted biomedical devices. Developed by an interdisciplinary team at the University of Alberta and Canada's National Institute for Nanotechnology, this new process was developed to address some of the problems associated with the introduction of stainless steel into the human body.

Posted: Apr 27th, 2011

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2D beats 3D - Ceria in platelet form stores more oxygen than nanocrystalline form

Three dimensions are not necessarily better than two. Not where ceria is concerned, in any case. Ceria is an important catalyst. Because of its outstanding ability to store oxygen and release it, ceria is primarily used in oxidation reactions. Christopher B. Murray and a team at the University of Pennsylvania have now developed a simple synthetic technique to produce ceria in the form of nanoplates.

Posted: Apr 27th, 2011

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Free report: Photovoltaic Technologies for the 21st Century

What are the major technology challenges to future growth in the solar-cell industry? Where are the big-bang-for-the-buck R+D investment opportunities? These and other questions were put to a group of 72 internationally recognized experts in the field at a 2010 special workshop.

Posted: Apr 27th, 2011

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Understanding how glasses 'relax' provides some relief for manufacturers

Researchers have used computer simulations to gain basic insights into a fundamental problem in material science related to glass-forming materials, offering a precise mathematical and physical description of the way temperature affects the rate of flow in this broad class of materials - a long-standing goal.

Posted: Apr 27th, 2011

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Two graphene layers may be better than one

Researchers have shown that the electronic properties of two layers of graphene vary on the nanometer scale. The surprising new results reveal that not only does the difference in the strength of the electric charges between the two layers vary across the layers, but they also actually reverse in sign to create randomly distributed puddles of alternating positive and negative charges.

Posted: Apr 27th, 2011

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Good eggs - nanomagnets offer food for thought about computer memories

Magnetics researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) colored lots of eggs recently. Bunnies and children might find the eggs a bit small - in fact, too small to see without a microscope. But these "eggcentric" nanomagnets have another practical use, suggesting strategies for making future low-power computer memories.

Posted: Apr 27th, 2011

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DNA, folded into complex shapes, could have a big impact on nanotechnology

While the primary job of DNA in cells is to carry genetic information from one generation to the next, some scientists also see the highly stable and programmable molecule as an ideal building material for nanoscale structures that could be used to deliver drugs, act as biosensors, perform artificial photosynthesis and more.

Posted: Apr 27th, 2011

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Gold(en) boost for organic solar cells

A gold plated window as the transparent electrode for organic solar cells is now a reality thanks to a team of researchers from the University of Warwick in the UK. The upshot of this development, apart from its innovation, is that it could be relatively cheap because the gold used is just 8 nanometers thick.

Posted: Apr 26th, 2011

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New nanobead approach could revolutionize sensor technology

Researchers at Oregon State University have found a way to use magnetic "nanobeads" to help detect chemical and biological agents, with possible applications in everything from bioterrorism to medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring or even water and food safety.

Posted: Apr 26th, 2011

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