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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Water down the nanotube

By discovering the physical mechanism behind the rapid transport of water in carbon nanotubes, scientists at the University of Illinois have moved a step closer to ultra-efficient, next-generation nanofluidic devices for drug delivery, water purification and nano-manufacturing.

Posted: Sep 16th, 2008

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Raising and sinking nanoparticles on thin film

In a finding that could speed the use of sensors or barcodes at the nanoscale, North Carolina State University engineers have shown that certain types of tiny organic particles, when heated to the proper temperature, bob to the surface of a layer of a thin polymer film and then can reversibly recede below the surface when heated a second time.

Posted: Sep 16th, 2008

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CCNY receives $5 million grant to establish nanotechnology center

The City College of New York (CCNY) announced today that it has received $5 million over five years from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to establish a new, interdisciplinary research center that will investigate new applications for nanostructures and nanomaterials in sensors and energy systems.

Posted: Sep 16th, 2008

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Observing single molecules inside living cells

Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are helping to develop a new technique that will enable them to create detailed high-resolution images, giving scientists an unprecedented look at the atomic structure of cellular molecules.

Posted: Sep 16th, 2008

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Potential problems with using carbon nanotubes as interconnects

Researchers at the University of Surrey's Advanced Technology Institute (UK) have used scanning tunnelling microscopy to confirm remarkable changes in the fundamental electronic behaviour when double-walled carbon nanotubes are subject to radial deformations and torsional strain.

Posted: Sep 16th, 2008

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Graphene shows promise of storing large quantities of renewable electrical energy

Engineers and scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have achieved a breakthrough in the use of a one-atom thick structure called graphene as a new carbon-based material for storing electrical charge in ultracapacitor devices, perhaps paving the way for the massive installation of renewable energies such as wind and solar power.

Posted: Sep 16th, 2008

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