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Researchers in China link nanoparticle exposure to lung failure deaths

A study published in the forthcoming issue of the European Respiratory Journal (ERJ), has for the first time claimed a concrete link between exposure to nanoparticles in adhesive paint and development of severe pulmonary fibrosis in a group of young female workers; two of whom went on to suffer fatal lung failure.

Posted: Aug 19th, 2009

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Mapping nanotechnology in the U.S.

Data released today by the Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies (PEN) highlights more than 1,200 companies, universities, government laboratories, and other organizations across all 50 U.S. states and in the District of Columbia that are involved in nanotechnology research, development, and commercialization.

Posted: Aug 18th, 2009

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NanoEurope 2009 - call for posters

NanoEurope is, since 2003, the premium annual European symposium on selected areas of nanotechnology research, development and commercialization of industrial applications. Submit your poster contribution. Don't miss this unique opportunity. Present breaking results, ongoing research projects, and speculative or innovative work in progress.

Posted: Aug 18th, 2009

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'Cornell dots' make the world's tiniest laser

Researchers have modified nanoparticles known as 'Cornell dots' to make the world's tiniest laser - so small it could be incorporated into microchips to serve as a light source for photonic circuits.

Posted: Aug 18th, 2009

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'Electronic tongue' with a taste for sweets

In a new approach to an effective 'electronic tongue' that mimics human taste, scientists in Illinois are reporting development of a small, inexpensive, lab-on-a-chip sensor that quickly and accurately identifies sweetness.

Posted: Aug 17th, 2009

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Flat bacteria in nanoslits

It appears that bacteria can squeeze through practically anything. In extremely small nanoslits they take on a completely new flat shape. Even in this squashed form they continue to grow and divide at normal speeds.

Posted: Aug 17th, 2009

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Researcher says microchannels could advance tissue engineering methods

Utilizing fractal patterns similar to those created by lightning strikes, Victor Ugaz, associate professor in the Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A+M University, has created a network of microchannels that could advance the field of tissue engineering by serving as a three-dimensional vasculature for the support of larger tissue constructs, such as human organs.

Posted: Aug 17th, 2009

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