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Ceramic coatings may protect jet engines from volcanic ash

Last year's $2 billion shutdown of European airspace following a volcanic eruption in Iceland alerted everyone to the danger that ash clouds can pose to aircraft engines. Now, researchers have discovered that a new class of ceramic coatings could offer jet engines special protection against volcanic ash damage in the future.

Posted: Apr 13th, 2011

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New fracture resistance mechanisms provided by graphene

A team of researchers from the University of Arizona and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have increased the toughness of ceramic composites by using graphene reinforcements that enable new fracture resistance mechanisms in the ceramic.

Posted: Apr 13th, 2011

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Model Fuel Cell Car Competition: Fueling future scientists and engineers

It may not be rocket science, but it's close. Fuel cells have been used to power spacecrafts for years and on Saturday, April 16, 2011, Chicago-area middle school students will use fuel cells to power model cars at equipment manufacturer Case New Holland (CNH) in Burr Ridge, Ill., as part of the Chicago Regional Science Bowl, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Argonne National Laboratory.

Posted: Apr 13th, 2011

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Nanotechnology filter separates water and oil

Water and oil may not mix, but, like two boxers nearing the end of the final round, they can get awfully tangled up. Now, Michigan Technological University scientists Yoke Khin Yap and Jaroslaw Drelich have created a filter that separates the two substances as quickly and cleanly as a ref breaking up a clinch.

Posted: Apr 13th, 2011

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Microfluidic chip for quick on-site diagnosis of infectious diseases

Linus Tzu-Hsiang Kao and co-workers at the A*STAR Institute of Microelectronics and the Genome Institute of Singapore have now developed a silicon-based microfluidic system that is able to sense and differentiate the H1N1 virus from other seasonal influenza strains in ultrasmall specimens.

Posted: Apr 13th, 2011

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Electromechanical switch using a single magnetic plate delivers superior performance in a tiny package

Transistors are commonly used in electronics as switches to turn an electrical current on or off. For applications that require a very large ratio between the on and off current, however, it is necessary to use mechanical 'reed' switches, in which magnetic fields physically move metallic wires (or reeds) towards and away from electrical contact points. As devices become more compact, these mechanical switches need to be miniaturized into small packages, without sacrificing performance.

Posted: Apr 13th, 2011

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Biosensors: Sweet and simple

New substrates boost the sensitivity of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the detection of glucose at physiological concentrations.

Posted: Apr 13th, 2011

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The use of a different resonance in atomic force microscopy enhances resolution

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a highly sensitive form of microscopy that makes it possible to map a surface with near-atomic resolution. Shaw Wei Kok and colleagues from A*STAR's Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology have now developed an AFM measurement method that can improve the sensitivity of the technique even further.

Posted: Apr 13th, 2011

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UAlbany NanoCollege presents 'Nanotechnology and Nature' program

Nearly 100 middle-school students from three Capital Region schools experienced the convergence of "Nanotechnology and Nature" during an educational outreach program presented by the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) of the University at Albany on April 12 at the Albany Pine Bush Preserve Discovery Center.

Posted: Apr 12th, 2011

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NCI awards $1.7 million to cancer specialist at Children's Hospital Los Angeles

Fatih Uckun, MD, PhD, head of Translational Research in Leukemia and Lymphoma at the Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, and a research professor of Pediatrics at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, has been awarded $1.7 million from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to support development of a new strategy to overcome the resistance of cancer cells to radiation therapy.

Posted: Apr 12th, 2011

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