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The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

A step forward toward quantum computers

Researchers have developed a model that provides the basis for the application of commercial photonic components to the field of quantum computers and quantum communications.

Posted: Oct 18th, 2011

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Caltech awarded $12.6 million for new Institute for Quantum Information and Matter

The California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has been awarded $12.6 million in funding over the next five years by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to create a new Physics Frontiers Center. Dubbed the Institute for Quantum Information and Matter (IQIM), the center will bring physicists and computer scientists together to push theoretical and experimental boundaries in the study of exotic quantum states.

Posted: Oct 17th, 2011

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Shaken, not stirred: Scientists spy molecular maneuvers (w/video)

Stir this clear liquid in a glass vial and nothing happens. Shake this liquid, and free-floating sheets of protein-like structures emerge, ready to detect molecules or catalyze a reaction. This is the latest research from Berkeley Lab scientists unveiling how slim sheets of protein-like structures self-assemble.

Posted: Oct 17th, 2011

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New light at the end of the tunnel

Who wants to decant liquids in the kitchen without spilling knows to value a funnel. Funnels are not only useful tools in the kitchen. Light can also be efficiently concentrated with funnels. In this case, the funnels have to be about 10.000-times smaller.

Posted: Oct 17th, 2011

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Battery research: Bionics reduces filling time

The latest development by engineers of KIT is inspired by nature. To fill the porous electrodes of lithium-ion batteries more rapidly with liquid electrolyte, they use a physico-chemical effect that also provides for transport in trees. The new process increases the throughput of battery production and reduces investment costs.

Posted: Oct 17th, 2011

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Bristly particles could be boon for powerplants

A well-known method of making heat sinks for electronic devices is a process called sintering, in which powdered metal is formed into a desired shape and then heated in a vacuum to bind the particles together. But in a recent experiment, some students tried sintering copper particles in air and got a big surprise.

Posted: Oct 17th, 2011

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