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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Trapping prostate cancer cells in nanomaterials to keep them from spreading

When prostate cancer stem cells were enclosed in self-assembling nanomaterials made of peptides (SAP), the SAP stopped cancer stem cell colony formation and also stopped the division of cancer cells in laboratory cultures (in vitro). According to the international team of researchers who built and tested the nano-sized traps, the cancer cells grew and multiplied after they were "liberated" from their SAP prisons.

Posted: Mar 10th, 2011

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Computational models predict nanoparticle toxicity

Researchers are developing computational models to predict the behaviour of nanomaterials in biological systems. Such predictions will allow researchers to streamline and prioritise the toxicological testing of nanomaterials.

Posted: Mar 10th, 2011

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Printed electronics - very different approaches by region

The regions of the world see printed electronics differently. For example, the USA focuses on the military applications among others. East Asia wishes to use printed electronics to reinforce its dominance in electronic displays. Europe has interest in a very wide range of potential applications, with consumer packaged goods being just one of many applicational sectors prioritised.

Posted: Mar 10th, 2011

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Electromechanical circuit sets record beating microscopic 'drum'

Physicists have demonstrated an electromechanical circuit in which microwaves communicate with a vibrating mechanical component 1,000 times more vigorously than ever achieved before in similar experiments. This apparatus is a new tool for processing information and potentially could control the motion of a relatively large object at the smallest possible, or quantum, scale.

Posted: Mar 9th, 2011

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New microscope decodes complex eye circuitry

Using a novel microscopy method developed at the Institute, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Medical Research in Heidelberg have now discovered that the distribution of the synapses between ganglion cells and interneurons follows highly specific rules. Only those dendrites that extend from the cell body of the amacrine cell in a direction opposite to the preferred direction of the ganglion cell connect with the ganglion cell.

Posted: Mar 9th, 2011

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Pinpointing air pollution's effects on the heart

In a new study, scientists showed that in people with diabetes, breathing ultrafine particles can activate platelets, cells in the blood that normally reduce bleeding from a wound, but can contribute to cardiovascular disease.

Posted: Mar 9th, 2011

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Toward real time observation of electron dynamics in atoms and molecules

Another step has been taken in matter imaging. By using very short flashes of light produced by a technology developed at the national infrastructure Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) located at INRS University, researchers have obtained groundbreaking information on the electronic structure of atoms and molecules by observing for the first time ever electronic correlations using the method of high harmonic generation.

Posted: Mar 9th, 2011

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MIT student inventor Alice A. Chen receives Lemelson-MIT Student Prize

Alice A. Chen, a biomedical engineer and graduate student in the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST) and Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), today received the prestigious $30,000 Lemelson-MIT Student Prize for her innovative applications of microtechnology to study human health and disease.

Posted: Mar 9th, 2011

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