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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Nanoparticle enhances anticancer immune therapy with a one-two punch

Researchers have developed a novel system to simultaneously deliver a sustained dose of both an immune-system booster and a chemical to counter the cancer's secretions, resulting in a powerful therapy that, in mice, delayed tumor growth, sent tumors into remission, and dramatically increased survival rates.

Posted: Aug 17th, 2012

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Polymer nanoparticle overcomes anticancer drug resistance

In a nanotechnology two-for-one, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence have created a polymer nanoparticle that overcomes tumor resistance to the common anticancer agent doxorubicin and that protects the heart against drug-triggered damage, a therapy-ending side effect that limits doxorubicin's effectiveness. This novel nanoparticle incorporates both doxorubicin and curcumin, a major component of the bright yellow spice turmeric.

Posted: Aug 17th, 2012

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Gold nanorods hitch ride on immune cells that target breast tumors

One of the challenges in treating cancer, whether using nanotechnology or not, is that tumors can often be inaccessible to the therapies designed to kill them. Mostafa El-Sayed, of the Georgia Institute of Technology, and his colleagues are attempting to overcome this obstacle by designing drug-loaded gold nanorods that attract the attention of tumor-associated immune cells known as macrophages.

Posted: Aug 17th, 2012

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Lessons learned in creating biomedical nanoparticles for human use

Over the past six years, the National Cancer Institute's Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory has characterized more than 250 different nanomaterials developed by over 75 research groups. This extensive experience has given NCL staff a unique perspective on how to design safe and biocompatible nanomaterials for human use.

Posted: Aug 17th, 2012

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Nanoscale constrictions open up

State-of-the-art transport measurements reveal that certain geometries of bottleneck junctions have unexpected effects on particle flow.

Posted: Aug 17th, 2012

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University of Sydney welcomes its first super-resolution microscope

The University of Sydney has welcomed the first ground state depletion (GSD) super-resolution microscope in the Southern Hemisphere, which will enable researchers to see materials at a cellular level and open the way for improvements in the diagnosis of diseases including cancer.

Posted: Aug 16th, 2012

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Finding the nano-needle in the haystack

Norwegian researchers are among the first in the world to use radioactivity to trace nanoparticles in experimental animals and soil. Their findings have made it easier to identify any negative environmental impact of nanoparticles, which are found in an increasing number of products.

Posted: Aug 16th, 2012

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Sunflowers inspire more efficient solar power system

It's a clever bit of natural engineering that inspired imitation from a UW-Madison electrical and computer engineer, who has found a way to mimic the passive heliotropism seen in sunflowers for use in the next crop of solar power systems.

Posted: Aug 16th, 2012

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Electronic read-out of quantum bits

Quantum computers promise to reach computation speeds far beyond that of today's computers. As they would use quantum effects, however, they would also be susceptible to external interferences. Information flow into and out of the system is a critical point. Researchers from KIT with partners from Grenoble and Strasbourg have now read out the quantum state of an atom directly by using electrodes.

Posted: Aug 16th, 2012

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Quantenbits elektronisch auslesen

Quantencomputer versprechen Rechengeschwindigkeiten, die weit jenseits der Geschwindigkeit heutiger Computer liegen. Da sie Quanteneffekte nutzen würden, sind sie aber auch anfällig für Störungen von außen und der Informationsfluss in und aus dem System ist ein kritischer Punkt. Nun haben Forscher vom KIT mit Partnern aus Grenoble und Straßburg den Quantenzustand eines Atoms mittels Elektroden direkt ausgelesen.

Posted: Aug 16th, 2012

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