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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Physicists build basic quantum computing circuit

Exerting delicate control over a pair of atoms within a mere seven-millionths-of-a-second window of opportunity, physicists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison created an atomic circuit that may help quantum computing become a reality.

Posted: Feb 25th, 2010

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Nano meets macro: Social perspectives on nanoscale sciences and technologies

This book explores the enormous diversity in social perspectives on the emergence of nanotechnologies. The diversity is structured by applying five broad categories: Philosophy, governance, science, representations and arts, and attention is drawn to important research lines and pertinent questions within and across these categories.

Posted: Feb 25th, 2010

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EU project PHOCUS is on fast photonic systems

The PHOCUS ('Towards a photonic liquid state machine based on delay-coupled systems') project is designing and launching photonic systems that communicate through light for fast signal and versatile handling.

Posted: Feb 25th, 2010

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Cell-inspired electronics

By mimicking cells, MIT researcher designs electronic circuits for ultra-low-power and biomedical applications.

Posted: Feb 25th, 2010

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Special LaserFest seminar highlights history and future of laser technology

As part of LaserFest, the year-long celebration of the 50th anniversary of the first working laser, the Optical Society (OSA) and the American Physical Society (APS) sponsored a special day-long seminar on the birth, growth and future developments in laser science and technology at the 2010 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting.

Posted: Feb 25th, 2010

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Where does the fluid go?

Revised model will help scientists better understand transport of fluid constituents, with a wide range of applications.

Posted: Feb 25th, 2010

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Neutrons poised to play big role in future scientific advances

Subatomic particles called neutrons are poised to play a big role in fighting HIV, slowing global warming, and improving manufacturing processes. The reason: They are the focus of a process called neutron scattering that provides unprecedented ways to study the chemistry of a wide range of important materials, including coal and biological cells.

Posted: Feb 24th, 2010

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