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The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

New tool detects Ebola, Marburg quickly, easily

Boston University researchers have developed a simple diagnostic tool that can quickly identify dangerous viruses like Ebola and Marburg. The biosensor, which is the size of a quarter and can detect viruses in a blood sample, could be used in developing nations, airports and other places where natural or man-made outbreaks could erupt.

Posted: Nov 22nd, 2010

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Ultrathin alternative to silicon for future electronics

There's good news in the search for the next generation of semiconductors. Researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California (UC) Berkeley, have successfully integrated ultra-thin layers of the semiconductor indium arsenide onto a silicon substrate to create a nanoscale transistor with excellent electronic properties.

Posted: Nov 22nd, 2010

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Breakthrough may lead to disposable e-readers

A discovery by University of Cincinnati engineering researcher Andrew Steckl could revolutionize display technology with e-paper that's fast enough for video yet cheap enough to be disposable.

Posted: Nov 22nd, 2010

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Imitating nature to engineer nanofilms

Scientists at the Naval Research Laboratory are part of a research team working to engineer surfaces that imitate some of the water repellency features found in nature. This technology offers the possibility of significant advances for producing new generations of coatings that will be of great value for military, medical, and energy applications.

Posted: Nov 22nd, 2010

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CNT Annual Conference on Carbon Nanomaterials

The German Innovation Alliance for Carbon Nanotubes will hold its annual conference in Ettlingen (near Karlsruhe, Germany) on 25th-27th January. This year the conference will be open to national and international visitors from research and industry. It offers a platform for the international CNT community to exchange results and ideas.

Posted: Nov 22nd, 2010

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Oxygen rich graphene support could lead to durable fuel cell catalysts

In the search for efficient, durable and commercially viable fuel cells, scientists at the University of Ulster's Nanotechnology Institute and collaborators from Peking University and University of Oxford have discovered a new catalyst-support combination that could make fuel cells more efficient and more resistant to carbon monoxide poisoning.

Posted: Nov 22nd, 2010

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Success in developing groundbreaking electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells

The Fuel Cell Nano-Materials Group at International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics has successfully developed two types of novel proton conducting oxide electrolytes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). By applying these electrolytes, the commercialization of SOFCs operating in the intermediate temperature range, 500C to 650C, has come into sight.

Posted: Nov 22nd, 2010

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Purdue gets $1.5 million for quantum information center

Purdue University has been awarded $1.5 million to study quantum information science, a new field paving the way for quantum computing - a novel method to process information that is faster, more powerful and more efficient than classical computing.

Posted: Nov 21st, 2010

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Emerging applications of carbon nanotubes

Jan M. Schnorr and Timothy M. Swager from the Department of Chemistry and Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies at MIT have published an overview of a variety of applications that are based on the unique properties of pristine as well as functionalized carbon nanotubes.

Posted: Nov 21st, 2010

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Researchers insert identification codes into mouse embryos

Researchers from the Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology at Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (UAB), in collaboration with researchers from the Institute of Microelectronics of Barcelona (IMB-CNM) of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), have developed an identification system for oocytes and embryos in which each can be individually tagged using silicon barcodes.

Posted: Nov 19th, 2010

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