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The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

The world's smallest microlaser

ETH-Zurich physicists have developed a new kind of laser that shatters the boundaries of possibility: it is by far the smallest electrically pumped laser in the world and one day could revolutionize chip technology.

Posted: Mar 23rd, 2010

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23 steps for a quantum walk

A team of scientists led by the Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences has successfully performed a quantum walk in a quantum system with up to 23 steps. \

Posted: Mar 23rd, 2010

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Giant 'microscope' will use neutrons to study glass transition

The National Science Foundation has awarded $1.65 million to a project led by Washington University in St. Louis physicist Ken Kelton to build an electrostatic levitation chamber that will be installed at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oakridge National Laboratory.

Posted: Mar 22nd, 2010

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Governing uncertainty: Environmental regulation in the age of nanotechnology

This is the first volume to engage scholarly perspectives on environmental regulation in light of the challenges posed by nanotechnology. Contributors focus on the overarching lessons of decades of regulatory response, while posing a fundamental question: How can government regulatory systems satisfy the desire for scientific innovation while also taking into account the direct and indirect effects of 21st century emerging technologies, particularly in the face of scientific uncertainties?

Posted: Mar 22nd, 2010

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Flexible Elektronik aus dem Drucker

Elektronische Anwendungen effektiver, sparsamer und umweltfreundlicher zu gestalten - dieses Ziel verfolgen Chemiker der Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena. Das Team um Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert vom Institut fuer Organische Chemie und Makromolekulare Chemie ist Partner im neuen europaeischen Gemeinschaftsprojekt LOTUS.

Posted: Mar 22nd, 2010

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Printable sensor reacts to finger's heat signal without being touched

The cellphone is switched off but immediately springs into action at the point of a finger. It is not necessary to touch the display. This touchless control is made possible by a polymer sensor affixed to the cellphone which, like human skin, reacts to the tiniest fluctuations in temperature and differences in pressure and recognizes the finger as it approaches.

Posted: Mar 22nd, 2010

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