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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Spinning information for better memory

Scientists have now shown that the spin of atomic nuclei in silicon can store information for over a minute and that the information can then be read out electrically, an important step in linking spintronics with classical electronics.

Posted: Jan 7th, 2011

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Expitaxial graphene shows promise for replacing silicon in electronics

With silicon device fabrication approaching its physical limits, many researchers believe graphene can provide a new platform material that would allow the semiconductor industry to continue its march toward ever-smaller and faster electronic devices -- progress described in Moore's Law. Though graphene will likely never replace silicon for everyday electronic applications, it could take over as the material of choice for high-performance devices.

Posted: Jan 7th, 2011

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The power of convergence

In white paper, MIT scientists discuss potential for revolutionary advances in biomedicine and other fields.

Posted: Jan 6th, 2011

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Researchers settle argument over mobility of flexible filaments

Researchers have settled a long-standing controversy in the field of polymer dynamics: The researchers proved once and for all that Theo Odijk at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands was correct in proclaiming that a little flexibility goes a long way for stiff filaments in a solution.

Posted: Jan 6th, 2011

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Free online event: Nanoscience research highlights - Asia (East)

Organised by The Chinese Society for Micro and Nano Technology (CSMNT), this online workshop will showcase the latest developments in the region and will offer a unique platform for nanoscientists and researchers to meet and listen to presentations given by our expert speakers from China, Malaysia and Thailand.

Posted: Jan 6th, 2011

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Scientists develop groundbreaking technology to detect Alzheimer's disease

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute, have developed a novel technology that is able to detect the presence of immune molecules specific to Alzheimer's disease in patients' blood samples. While still preliminary, the findings offer clear proof that this breakthrough technology could be used in the development of biomarkers for a range of human diseases.

Posted: Jan 6th, 2011

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Extracting cellular 'engines' may aid in understanding mitochondrial diseases

Medical researchers who crave a means of exploring the genetic culprits behind a host of neuromuscular disorders may have just had their wish granted by a team working at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where scientists have performed surgery on single cells to extract and examine their mitochondria.

Posted: Jan 6th, 2011

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Newly developed cloak hides underwater objects from sonar

In one University of Illinois lab, invisibility is a matter of now you hear it, now you don't. Led by mechanical science and engineering professor Nicholas Fang, Illinois researchers have demonstrated an acoustic cloak, a technology that renders underwater objects invisible to sonar and other ultrasound waves.

Posted: Jan 5th, 2011

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Study of graphene grain boundaries reveals atomic patchwork quilts

A quick look at new Cornell research hints at colorful patchwork quilts, but they are actually pictures of graphene -- one atom-thick sheets of carbon stitched together at tilted interfaces. Researchers have unveiled striking, atomic-resolution details of what graphene 'quilts' look like at the boundaries between patches, and have uncovered key insights into graphene's electrical and mechanical properties.

Posted: Jan 5th, 2011

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From molecule to object - Largest synthetic structure with molecular precision

Organic Chemists have always been trying to imitate biology. Although it is possible to make many molecules that imitate biomolecules in terms of structure and function, it remains a challenge to attain the size and form of large biomolecules. An international team at the ETH Zurich has now introduced a branched polymer that resembles the tobacco mosaic virus in size and cylindrical form.

Posted: Jan 4th, 2011

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New glaucoma test allows earlier, more accurate detection

Cumbersome glaucoma tests that require a visit to the ophthalmologist could soon be history thanks to a home test. The self-test instrument has been designed in Eniko Enikov's lab at the UA College of Engineering. Gone are the eye drops and need for a sterilized sensor. In their place is an easy-to-use probe that gently rubs the eyelid and can be used at home.

Posted: Jan 4th, 2011

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