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The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Novel memristor chips for tomorrow's energy-efficient computers

A working group headed by Professor Rainer Waser from Forschungszentrum Juelich and RWTH Aachen University has developed a novel switching concept and the related technology for so-called memristor chips. With their research findings, the scientists are preparing for a paradigm shift in the architecture of computer chips.

Posted: Apr 19th, 2010

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Fast aluminium-gallium-nitride transistors could save energy

Transistors, the cornerstone of electronics, are lossy and therefore consume energy. Researchers from the ETH Zurich and EPF Lausanne have developed transistors targeting high switching speeds and higher output powers. The devices can be used more efficiently as conventional transistors, so as to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

Posted: Apr 19th, 2010

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Frontiers in neuroengineering - call for papers

We invite Authors to participate with contributions in all topics related to Neuroengineering, from novel (nano)materials interfacing the nervous system or as tools for basic research, to novel enabling technologies, and from basic neurobiology and electrophysiology to neuroprosthetics. We aim at covering topics across levels of investigations, from the single-neuron to the network- and the system levels.

Posted: Apr 18th, 2010

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How to split a water molecule

A research team at RIKEN has succeeded for the first time in selectively controlling for reaction products in the dissociation of a single water molecule on an ultrathin film.

Posted: Apr 18th, 2010

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A brain-recording device that melts into place

Scientists have developed a brain implant that essentially melts into place, snugly fitting to the brain's surface. The technology could pave the way for better devices to monitor and control seizures, and to transmit signals from the brain past damaged parts of the spinal cord.

Posted: Apr 18th, 2010

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Nanofibers carry toxic peptides into cancer cells

Researchers have long known that certain peptides are capable of killing cells by inserting themselves into the cell membranes and disrupting normal membrane structure and function. Now, researchers have learned how to deliver these cytotoxic peptides to tumor cells using self-assembling nanofibers that can slip into cancer cells and allow the toxic peptides to do their job from inside the cell.

Posted: Apr 17th, 2010

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Radioactive gold nanoparticles destroy prostate tumors, leaving healthy tissue untouched

One of the promises of nanoparticles as delivery agents for cancer therapeutics is that they will attack tumors while sparing healthy tissue from the damage normally associated with today's anticancer therapies. That promise is closer to realization thanks to the results of a study in which tumor-bearing mice were treated with a single dose of radioactive gold nanoparticles.

Posted: Apr 17th, 2010

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