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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Lasers polish metal surfaces with nanoscale precision

Polishing metal surfaces is a demanding but monotonous task, and it is difficult to find qualified young specialists. Polishing machines do not represent an adequate alternative because they cannot get to difficult parts of the surface. A new solution is provided by laser polishers.

Posted: Nov 2nd, 2009

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High-energy nanocomposite materials for next-generation magnets

The University of Delaware has won a $4.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA-E) to lead a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional research project to develop the next generation of high-performance permanent magnets.

Posted: Nov 2nd, 2009

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Breakthrough in industrial-scale nanotube processing

Rice University scientists today unveiled a method for the industrial-scale processing of pure carbon-nanotube fibers that could lead to revolutionary advances in materials science, power distribution and nanoelectronics. The result of a nine-year program, the method builds upon tried-and-true processes that chemical firms have used for decades to produce plastics.

Posted: Nov 2nd, 2009

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The science of invisibility cloaks

Thanks to The Royal Society's Theo Murphy Blue Skies Award, Professor Ulf Leonhardt, who holds the Chair in Theoretical Physics at The University of St Andrews, will spend the next two years working on a blueprint for a cloaking device.

Posted: Nov 2nd, 2009

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Science begins at the world's most powerful X-ray laser

The first experiments are now underway using the world's most powerful X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, located at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Illuminating objects and processes at unprecedented speed and scale, the LCLS has embarked on groundbreaking research in physics, structural biology, energy science, chemistry and a host of other fields.

Posted: Nov 2nd, 2009

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Where do nanomaterials go in the body?

Little is known about what happens if nanomaterials get into your body - where do they go? North Carolina State researchers are working to answer that question under a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Posted: Nov 2nd, 2009

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Database details 2.7 million possible structures for molecular sieves

In all the world, there are about 200 types of zeolite, a compound of silicon, aluminum and oxygen that gives civilization such things as laundry detergent, kitty litter and gasoline. But thanks to computations by Rice University professor Michael Deem and his colleagues, it appears there are more types of zeolites than once thought. A lot more.

Posted: Nov 2nd, 2009

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Nanotechnology concrete is the winner of the 2009 MIT Elevator Pitch Contest

A panel of venture capitalists and industry specialists named Nanoengineered Concrete, an entry in the Energy category, the winner of the 2009 MIT Elevator Pitch Contest. This three-year-old contest, which is open to MIT students from across its five schools, neighboring colleges, and Boston-area entrepreneurs, allows competing teams 60 seconds to deliver a persuasive elevator pitch to the panel of judges.

Posted: Nov 2nd, 2009

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