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Nanotechnology against oil pollution

The young company HeiQ helps with oil disasters. Fleece mats treated with a special impregnating technique can soak up huge amounts of oil and thus protect entire stretches of coast from contamination.

Posted: Jul 7th, 2011

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New nanomaterial developed from plants is stronger than steel

It's super strong, it's green and it's providing new opportunities for business in Alberta. It's called nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and Alberta is about to become a leader in its production and study. A new Edmonton-based pilot facility will be the first in Canada to produce the quality of NCC that researchers need to fully explore all its potential applications.

Posted: Jul 6th, 2011

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Understanding quantum magnetism, atom by atom

Joint Quantum Institute researchers led by Christopher Monroe, with theoreticians from University of Michigan, University of Auckland, and Georgetown University have observed a quantum ferromagnet using a nine ion crystal, in an atom-by-atom approach to quantum simulations of magnetism.

Posted: Jul 6th, 2011

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Researchers apply NMR/MRI to microfluidic chromatography

By pairing an award-winning remote-detection version of NMR/MRI technology with a unique version of chromatography specifically designed for microfluidic chips, researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have opened the door to a portable system for highly sensitive multi-dimensional chemical analysis that would be impractical if not impossible with conventional technologies.

Posted: Jul 6th, 2011

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Cooler than ever: Mechanical micro-drum chilled to quantum ground state

Showcasing new tools for widespread development of quantum circuits made of mechanical parts, scientists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a flexible, broadly usable technique for steadily calming the vibrations of an engineered mechanical object down to the quantum 'ground state', the lowest possible energy level.

Posted: Jul 6th, 2011

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Nanotechnology detector for deadly anthrax

An automatic and portable detector that takes just fifteen minutes to analyze a sample suspected of contamination with anthrax is being developed by US researchers. The technology amplifies any anthrax DNA present in the sample and can reveal the presence of just 40 microscopic cells of the deadly bacteria Bacillus anthracis.

Posted: Jul 6th, 2011

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Red light from carbon nanotubes

To the human eye, carbon nanotubes usually appear as a black powder. They can hardly be forced to emit light, as they are excellent electrical conductors and capture the energy from other luminescent chemical species placed nearby. The researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw contributed recently to the development of a relatively simple method allowing the nanotubes exposed to UV to emit red light.

Posted: Jul 6th, 2011

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The forces of attraction - how cells change direction

Many cell types in higher organisms are capable of implementing directed motion in response to the presence of certain chemical attractants in their vicinity. A team at the Center for NanoScience (CeNS) at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) Muenchen has developed a novel technique to expose an ensemble of living cells to rapidly varying concentrations of chemoattractants.

Posted: Jul 6th, 2011

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A new way to build nanostructures

The making of three-dimensional nanostructured materials - ones that have distinctive shapes and structures at scales of a few billionths of a meter - has become a fertile area of research, producing materials that are useful for electronics, photonics, phononics and biomedical devices. But the methods of making such materials have been limited in the 3-D complexity they can produce. Now, an MIT team has found a way to produce more complicated structures by using a blend of current "top-down" and "bottom-up" approaches.

Posted: Jul 6th, 2011

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