Open menu

Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Posted: Sep 23, 2014

A special material could unlock potential for faster computing

(Nanowerk News) University of Utah engineers discovered a way to create a special material – a metal layer on top of a silicon semiconductor – that could lead to cost-effective, superfast computers that perform lightning-fast calculations but don’t overheat.
This new “topological insulator” behaves like an insulator on the inside but conducts electricity on the outside and may pave the way for quantum computers and fast spintronic devices.
The research, led by University of Utah materials science and engineering professor Feng Liu, was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences ("Epitaxial growth of large-gap quantum spin Hall insulator on semiconductor surface").
Feng Liu (left), chair of the University of Utah Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Miao Zhou, a postdoctoral fellow
Feng Liu (left), chair of the University of Utah Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Miao Zhou, a postdoctoral fellow, co-authored a study of a new “topological insulator” that could lead theoretically to faster computing.
Since the discovery of topological insulators almost a decade ago as a class of material designed to speed up computers, scientists have been trying to create a topological insulator that creates a large energy gap.
An energy gap is the amount of energy it takes for electrons to conduct electricity in a given material. A larger gap allows electricity to be conducted on a material’s surface so a computer can operate at room temperature while remaining stable. Liu and his team found that bismuth metal deposited on the silicon can result in a more stable large-gap topological insulator. But just as important, this process can be cost-effective and readily integrated with current widespread silicon semiconductor manufacturing techniques.
“We can put it on silicon so it can be married or combined with the existing semiconductor technology,” Liu says. “This is very important. It makes it more experimentally feasible and practically realistic.”
Because the bismuth layer is atomically bonded but electronically isolated from the silicon layer, it creates a large energy gap.
“It has the largest energy gap that was ever predicted. It makes room-temperature applications a possibility for topological insulator-based devices or computers,” Liu says.
Quantum computers, which have not been built yet, would run on the principles of quantum mechanics, in which the smallest particles of light and matter can be in different places at the same time. Quantum computers theoretically could be billions of times faster than conventional computers.
Quantum computing is expected to be used in a variety of uses, including in big data centers, security systems and encryption.
Spintronics is a new technology that uses the spin of an electron (instead of charge) in electronic devices. Spin is a property of electrons that makes the electron act like a tiny magnet. Spintronic devices can be used to encode and transfer information in electronic circuits and computers.
Liu’s study was funded primarily by the U.S. Department of Energy and partly by the National Science Foundation through the University of Utah’s Materials Research Science and Engineering Center.
Liu conducted the research with materials science and engineering postdoctoral fellows Miao Zhou, Zheng Liu, and Zhengfei Wang, and doctoral student Wenmei Ming.
Source: University of Utah
Subscribe to a free copy of one of our daily
Nanowerk Newsletter Email Digests
with a compilation of all of the day's news.
If you liked this article, please give it a quick review on reddit or StumbleUpon. Thanks!
These articles might interest you as well: