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Nanotechnology Research – Universities


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Showing results 276 - 300 of 535 for university labs starting with U:

For many years, the group's research theme has been the resonant interaction of electromagnetic waves, or photons, with condensed matter, consisting in most cases of organic molecules. Photons can be simply absorbed by matter, they can flip spins in a magnetic field in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), or excite the electron cloud in optical absorption experiments. However, many of the effects they look at are more complex, nonlinear. They study, for example, the effect of two frequencies on spin echoes in EPR, the emission of light at wavelengths different from that of the excitation laser (fluorescence), and the effect of spin resonance on this emission (optically detected magnetic resonance, ODMR), or phenomena involving two or more photons, such as spectral hole-burning.
Research on the investigation of novel photonic and electronic semiconductor materials and phenomena and the development of devices for key areas such as internet communication, data storage, displays, illumination, environmental monitoring and life sciences.
Focus on nanobiomaterials- e.g. nanoparticles for drug delivery and diagnostics.
The group research Interests are in Semiconductor Nanocrystals and Nanowires with emphasis on Synthesis, Assembly and Device Applications in Energy Storage and Energy Conversion Applications. The group also studies nucleation and growth in both hard (metal, semiconductor) and soft (pharmaceutical) nanocrystal materials with emphasis on size, shape and crystal phase control.
The Centre for Nanoscale Science brings together members of staff with interests in the material aspects of nanotechnology and nanoparticle research with a view to focussing these activities and to developing a powerful national centre.
The programme starts in late September each year and is divided into three approximately equal periods. The first and second periods consist of lectures, laboratory classes, seminars and similar material. In the third period, students undertake an individually supervised project on a topic relevant to their special interests.
The Nanoinvestigation Centre at Liverpool (NiCaL), supported by the Northwest European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), provides regional SMEs access to the University’s most advanced and powerful electron microscopy facilities. We also offer advice and full technical support from our experienced analysts and material scientists. Qualifying SMEs can gain access to NICal free of charge.
The current research themes of the SSRC cut across the disciplines of chemistry, physics, biology and materials science, and combine the efforts of both experimentalists and theoreticians. The overarching ambition of this work is to achieve nanoscale control, design and assembly of function.
More than 40 research scientists and engineers from diverse disciplines have come together in a new 106,000 square foot research facility on the University of Louisville's main campus. Engineers with specialties in MEMS, bioMEMS, nanotechnology, electrooptics, biomechanics, bioengineering, microfabrication, and theoretical and applied physics, work along side scientists from the College of Arts and Sciences with expertise in molecular, cellular and structural biology and medicinal and combinatorial chemistry, and with cancer and genetic researchers from the Schools of Medicine and Dentistry.
The research of the Interface Physics Group is dedicated to the exploration of new nanoscale phenomena and their application to nanotechnology.
Porous materials are omnipresent in nature: microporous materials, such as zeolite minerals, with pores of angstrom, molecular dimensions; mesoprous materials, such as cell membranes, with nanometre-sized pores; macroporous materials, such as diatom skeletons, with micron-sized pores. Synthetic analogues of such materials are prepared and studied here and find many industrial uses in for instance catalysis, water treatment, environmental clean-up, molecular separation and opto-electronics.
The goal of the centre is to create an easy-to-access-and-use, multidisciplinary workshop with extensive facilities, that allows researchers to fabricate, visualise and characterise structures and devices containing individual elements from a few microns down to 10 nm in size.
The group's research activities cover a range of topics concerned with the fundamental materials and physics issues surrounding advanced semiconductor devices, novel high speed electronic and optoelectronic devices, and advanced sensors and systems.
The Nano Engineering & Storage Technology (NEST) research group (formerly the Electronic & Information Storage Systems Research Group) has research interests in nano fabrication for data storage and advanced sensors applications and the investigation of data storage systems in general. The NEST group is housed in an integrated suite of staff offices, general-purpose laboratory space and class 100/1000 cleanrooms and is a founder member of the Manchester Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology (CMN) where the ground-breaking Nobel prize winning work on Graphene by Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov was undertaken.
EPSRC CDT in the Science and Applications of Graphene and Related Nanomaterials (GrapheneNOWNANO) is a newly established Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) based at the University of Manchester in partnership with Lancaster University. It builds on the world-leading expertise in the science and technology of graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials at Manchester and Lancaster to offer a broad interdisciplinary CDT.
The Nanostructured Materials research degrees are part of a large and multidisciplinary activity within the School of Materials. We have strong links with industry and leading research councils.
The Nanostructured Materials research degrees are part of a large and multidisciplinary activity within the School of Materials. We have strong links with industry and leading research councils.
The Nanostructured Materials research degrees are part of a large and multidisciplinary activity within the School of Materials. We have strong links with industry and leading research councils.
The Mission of the Center for Nanomedicine and Cellular Delivery (CNCD) at the University of Maryland is to create a multidisciplinary research environment that will provide expertise and foster collaborations for the design, development and translation into clinic of nanosystems for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.
The Center for Superconductivity Research has been merged with Condensed Matter Physics to create a new collaborative entity known as the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM). The CNAM is dedicated to advancing science and technology in the important areas of nanophysics and novel electronic materials.
The mission of IBBR is to leverage collective research strengths of the partnering Institutions in medicine, biosciences, technology, quantitative sciences and engineering, to develop integrated, cross-disciplinary team approaches to scientific discovery and education and to serve the expanding economic base of biosciences and technology in the state of Maryland and the Nation.
The group's research is centered on techniques for fabricating and characterizing nanometer scale structures, in directing their rapid self-assembly and in using nanometer scale structures to enhance the efficiency of devices which involve their interaction with light.
The CHM's mission is to conduct research in nanotechnology and to foster the development of new advances from laboratory innovation to manufacturable components and devices.
MassNanoTech, the research institute for nanotechnology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, coordinates research on nanoscale materials, devices and systems, collaborates with industry, advances nanotechnology commercialization, educates students, and fosters outreach activities.
The research of Rotello's group at the University of Massachusetts focuses on the area of supramolecular chemistry: the study and application of non-covalent interactions. These interactions include hydrogen bonding, aromatic stacking and other electrostatic attractions and repulsions. We are currently employing these concepts of molecular recognition to explore a wide range of important questions in areas of biology to materials chemistry.
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