Nanotechnology Videos

Our "NanoTube" collection of informative and noteworthy videos
in the areas of nanosciences and nanotechnology

1 - 10 of 12 in category Nanomanufacturing, Self-assembly:
 
Atom-by-atom extraction
Source: Ohio University/Hla Group
Individual silver atoms are pulled out from a nanosized silver cluster on a Ag(111) surface at 6 K using a scanning tunneling microscope tip. Just by approaching the tip close to a protruding part of the cluster, the binding energy of the topmost cluster atom is greatly reduced. When the STM-tip laterally moves, the atom breaks the bond with the neighboring atoms within the cluster, and follows the tip trajectory. This process involves manipulation of atom along rough terrains of the 3-D cluster surface.

Feasibility of molecular manufacturing
Source: Purdue University (via nanoHub)
A debate about the feasibility of Molecular Manufacturing. Can molecular assemblers be developed to create new materials, new devices, and even macroscopic objects? This animation is part of a museum exhibit developed for the Children's Museums.

Gear and shaft operation
Source: NASA Ames Research Center
An example of a carbon nanotube gear and shaft operation with a powered gear. The gearshaft is a carbon nanaotube which may be just 1 to 10 nanometers in diameter. Benzyne molecules (as teeth) are attached to carbon nanotubes (shafts) to form gears that can operate at GHz frequencies.

Gear rotation
Source: NASA Ames Research Center
An example of carbon nanotube gear rotation. The gearshaft is a carbon nanaotube which may be just 1 to 10 nanometers in diameter. Benzyne molecules (as teeth) are attached to carbon nanotubes (shafts) to form gears that can operate at GHz frequencies. This clip shows rotation speeds of 50/70/100 rot/ns in a vacuum.

IBM self assembly technology creates airgap microprocessors
Source: YouTube
IBM is applying a breakthrough self-assembling nanotechnology to conventional chip manufacturing, borrowing a process from nature to build the next generation computer chips. The natural pattern-creating process that forms seashells, snowflakes, and enamel on teeth has been harnessed by IBM to form trillions of holes that are used to create insulating vacuums around the miles of nano-scale wires packed next to each other inside computer chips.

NanoHand - Micro-nano systems for automatic handling of nanoobjects
Source: University of Oldenburg
A nanorobotic system, the so-called NanoLab, has been developed that allows for fully automated nanorobotic assembly of carbon nanotube-enhanced AFM supertips.

Nanomanufacturing: top-down and bottom-up
Source: Purdue University (via nanoHub)
An overview of nanomanufacturing techniques, explaining the difference between top-down and bottom-up approaches. This animation is part of a museum exhibit developed for the Children's Museums.

Rotary assembler
Source: E-Spaces
An animation of one possible version of a nanomanipulator array assembler system: The upper platter holds bulk-deposited molecules or moieties. An array of massively-parallel simple manipulators removes the molecules from the upper platter and adds them to devices being assembled on the lower platter. Different areas of the feedstock platter might have different kinds of molecules, such that several assembly steps can be carried out before having to change out the upper platter. The conical roller moves radially, while the upper platter moves up and down, to access these different areas. The STM tips would have some ability to compensate for the slippage of the roller as the tip reaches for its target.

Self Assembling Biomedical Nanoliter Containers
Source: The Johns Hopkins University
The Gracias Lab at Johns Hopkins has developed a relatively easy, precise, and cost-effective process by which the 2D templates of semi-tethered "faces" can self-assemble into controlled 3D structures by utilizing the natural phenomena of surface tension. This video highlights the development, manufacturing process, and proposed functions (cell encapsulation devices and controlled drug delivery carriers) of our self-assembling nanoliter containers.

Self-Assembly of Lithographically Patterned 3D Micro/Nanostructures
Source: The Johns Hopkins University
On the nanoscale, it is extremely difficult and expensive to fabricate analogs of macroscale engineering, such as grippers. Drawing inspiration from biological fabrication in nature, engineers are seeking to self-assemble structures from the bottom up. The Gracias Lab at The Johns Hopkins University has developed a relatively easy, precise, and cost-effective process by which the 2D templates of semi-tethered "faces" can self-assemble into controlled 3D structures by utilizing the natural phenomena of surface tension as well as thin-film stress.



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