Nanotechnology Basics

Ten things you should know about nanosciences
and nanotechnology

 

Nanotechnology – Frequently Asked Questions

What is nanotechnology?

Major technology shifts donít happen overnight; and rarely are they the result of a single breakthrough discovery. Nowhere is this more true than for the vast set of capabilities that we have come to simply call nanotechnology.
Nanotechnology is not an industry; nor is it a single technology or a single field of research. What we call nanotechnology consists of sets of enabling technologies applicable to many traditional industries (therefore it is more appropriate to speak of nanotechnologies in the plural).
What exactly is nanotechnology? We answer this question in depth in our Introduction to Nanotechnology section

How big is a nanometer?

A nanometer is one billionth of a meter. The prefix nano means 'one billionth', or 10-9, in the international system for units of weights and measures. The abbreviation for nanometer is nm. The term nanos comes from the Greek word for dwarf.
Also check our metric prefix table and The Scale of Things to see where nano fits in.

What is so special about nanotechnology?

In a nutshell: the mechanical rules that govern the nanoworld are quite different from our everyday, macroworld experience. This allows the fabrication of novel materials and applications that otherwise would not be possible. For more details, read our section on what is so special about nanotech and why it is an issue now.

What are nanomaterials?

Much of nanoscience and many nanotechnologies is concerned with producing new or enhanced materials.
Nanomaterials can be constructed by top down techniques, producing very small structures from larger pieces of material, for example by etching to create circuits on the surface of a silicon microchip.
They may also be constructed by bottom up techniques, atom by atom or molecule by molecule. One way of doing this is self-assembly, in which the atoms or molecules arrange themselves into a structure due to their natural properties. Crystals grown for the semiconductor industry provide an example of self assembly, as does chemical synthesis of large molecules.
Read our extensive section on nanomaterials for a list of nanomaterials being developed today: films and surfaces; single- and few-layer materials like graphene; nanotubes; nanowires; fullerenes; quantum dots and all kinds of nanoparticles.

Where is nanotechnology used today – Can I buy nanotechnology products?

Yes! Nanotechnology is becoming ubiquitous in our daily lives and has found its way into many commercial products, just to name a few: strong, lightweight materials for cars and planes; filters and membranes; targeted drug delivery for safer and more effective cancer treatments; computer processors and data storage; self-cleaning surfaces; more efficient solar cells; materials for skin, bone, and nerve cells regeneration.
Consumers come into contact with a variety of products in which nanomaterials have been processed. Nanomaterials are used in food packaging, textiles, kitchen devices, varnishes and paints. They are also used in products for surface sealing and cleaning as well as in polishing agents. Nanomaterials are also used in cosmetics. Titanium dioxide and zinc oxide are used as UV filters in sun creams, for example; nanosilver is used as an antimicrobial agent in textiles and nanoclay has various applications in the food packaging sector.
For further reading, we have compiled numerous articles on nanotechnology applications that are on the market or in development today.

Where is nanotechnology being developed?

In thousands of university, industry and government research laboratories around the world. Our Nanotechnology Company & Research Laboratories Directory currently lists almost 4000 entries.

Who is developing nanotechnology?

In thousands of university, industry and government research laboratories around the world. Our Nanotechnology Company & Research Laboratories Directory currently lists almost 4000 entries.
Rather than standing on the shoulders of a few intellectual giants, nanotechnologies get created by tens of thousands of researchers and scientists working on minute and sometimes arcane aspects of their fields of expertise in a multitude of areas; they come from different science backgrounds; live in different parts of the world; work for different organizations (government labs, industry labs, universities, private research facilities) and follow their own set of rules – get papers reviewed and published; achieve scientific recognition from their peers; struggle to get funding for new ideas; look to make that breakthrough discovery that leads to the ultimate resumé item, a nobel prize; get pushed by their funders to secure patent rights and commercialize new discoveries.
These two books provide a collection of essays about hundreds of researchers involved in all facets of nanotechnologies: Nano-Society: Pushing the Boundaries of Technology (Nanoscience & Nanotechnology Series) and Nanotechnology: The Future is Tiny

Are there any specific health or other risks from nanoproducts?

Unfortunately, there is no simple 'yes' or 'no' answer to this question. There are lots of different aspects to consider and we have tried to cover them all in our Nanotechnology – the Risk Factors article.

How to study nanotechnology? Where can I find a college or university that offers nanotechnology programs and degrees?

Which universities offer nanotechnology courses? Where can you get a degree in nanotechnology and related fields? Easy. We have compiled a database with about 300 bachelor, master, Ph.D. and other certification nanotechnology and nanoscience degree programs from around the world.

Where can I find companies that make nanomaterials or are involved in nanotechnologies?

Our extensive nanotechnology company database list raw material producers, companies involved in biomedicine and life sciences, all kinds of nano-related products, applications and instruments; as well as services and intermediaries.

What countries are active in nanotechnology?

Our Global Nanotechnology Markets section lists companies, research laboratories and degree programs by country as well as individual U.S. states.

Where can I find a list of nanotechnology-related events, seminars and conferences?

What professional journals and magazines cover nanotechnology-related issues?

We have compiled a global nanotech publications directory that lists publications dedicated wholly or primarily to nanoscience and nanotechnology – academic journals, magazines, newsletter, free e-books and book series.

Show me some cool nanotechnology images

Happy to. Some of the many nanotechnology images we have compiled for you will blow your mind!