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Posted: June 5, 2009

Cold Atoms and Molecules: Concepts, Experiments and Applications to Fundamental Physics

(Nanowerk News) A survey of the physics of ultracold atoms and molecules, taking into consideration the latest research on ultracold phenomena, such as Bose Einstein condensation and quantum computing. This textbook covers recent experimental results on atom and molecule cooling as well as the theoretical treatment.
From the Back Cover
A survey of the physics of ultracold atoms and molecules, taking into consideration the latest research on phenomena close to the absolute zero of termperature, such as Bose Einstein condensation, degenerate Fermi gases and ultracold atoms in lattices. This textbook covers recent experimental results on atomic and molecular quantum gases as well as the theoretical treatment.
From the Contents
  • Optical Cooling
  • Quantum Collisions
  • Frozen Rydberg Gases
  • Cold Molecules
  • Introduction to Bose-Einstein Condensation
  • Ultracold Fermi Gases: Properties and Techniques
  • Ultracold Atoms in Optical Lattices
  • Tutorial on Experimental Physics of Ultracold Gases
  • Matthias Weidemuller is Professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Heidelberg, where he holds the Chair for Quantum Dynamics of Atomic and Molecular Systems. After studying Physics in Bonn, Munich and Paris he attained his doctorate in 1995 at the Max-Planck-Institute for Quantum Optics in the research group of Prof. T.W. Hansch. He spent two years as a Postdoc at the University of Amsterdam and the FOM-Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics. In 1997 he worked the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg and later became head of the "Laser Cooling Group". From 2003 to 2008 he was Full Professor at the University of Freiburg. His group experimentally explores the quantum physics of ultracold atomic and molecular gases and aggregates at different levels of complexity.
    Claus Zimmermann is Professor for Experimental Physics at the University of Tubingen in Germany. In 1990 he attained his doctorate at the Max-Planck Institut for Quantum Optics in Munich in the research group of Prof. T. Hansch. He was appointed full Professor at the University of Tubingen in 1998. His scientific activities range from laser development, non-linear optics and precision spectroscopy to optical cooling and ultra cold quantum gases.
    Source: Wiley
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