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Posted: August 30, 2009

What is what in the nanoworld: A handbook on nanotechnology

(Nanowerk News) The second, completely revised and enlarged edition of What is What in the Nanoworld summarizes the terms and definitions, most important phenomena, and regulations occurring in the physics, chemistry, technology, and application of nanostructures. A representative collection of fundamental terms and definitions from quantum physics and chemistry, special mathematics, organic and inorganic chemistry, solid state physics, material science and technology accompanies recommended second sources (books, reviews, websites) for an extended study of any given subject.
Each entry interprets the term or definition under consideration and briefly presents the main features of the phenomena behind it. Additional information in the form of notes ("First described in", "Recognition", "More details in") supplements the entries and gives a historical perspective of the subject with reference to further sources.
Ideal for answering questions related to unknown terms and definitions among undergraduate and PhD students studying the physics of low-dimensional structures, nanoelectronics, and nanotechnology.
From the Back Cover
More than 1,400 entries, from a few sentences to a page in length. The second, completely revised and enlarged edition of this introductory reference handbook summarizes the terms and definitions, most important phenomena, and regulations occurring in the physics, chemistry, technology, and application of nanostructures. A representative collection of fundamental terms and definitions from quantum physics and chemistry, special mathematics, organic, and inorganic chemistry, solid state physics, material science and technology accompanies recommended second sources (books, reviews, websites) for an extended study of any given subject.
Each entry interprets the term or definition under consideration and briefly presents the main features of the phenomena behind it. Additional information in the form of notes ("First described in", "Recognition", "More details in") supplements the entries and gives a historical perspective of the subject with reference to further sources.
Ideal for answering questions related to unknown terms and definitions among undergraduate and PhD students studying the physics of low-dimensional structures, nanoelectronics, and nanotechnology.
About the Authors
Stefano Ossicini is Full Professor of general Physics at the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia (Italy) and Director of the PhD School in Physical and Nano-sciences at the same university. He also works as a researcher at the CNR-National Institute for the Physics of Matter (INFM) at the INFM National Center S3 (Nanostructures and biosystems at Surfaces).Professor Ossicini received his physics degree from the University of Rome in 1976. From 1978 to 1982, he was active as a post-doc and assistant at the Department of Theoretical Physics of the Free University in Berlin (Germany), and from 1982 to 1984 as a researcher at the University of Calabria (Italy). In 1984, he joined the staff at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. While Professor Ossicini's research activities were always focused on the theory of low-dimensional- and nanosystems, he has in recent years concentrated on the investigation of the structural, electronic, and optical properties of semiconductor nanostructures.
Victor E. Borisenko graduated from the Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radio-electronics (BSUIR) as an engineer in semiconductor electronics in 1973. He received his first doctorate in physics and mathematics in 1980, his second in 1988. Since 1990, he has held invited short-term positions as a professor in many universities worldwide, including the University of Salford in England, the University of Wuppertal in Germany, the University of Electro-communications in Tokyo, Japan and the Mediterranean University in Marseille, France. He now holds a chair as professor and vice-rector of BSUIR and acts as supervisor of the Interuniversity Center of Nanoelectronics and Novel Materials. Since 1995, Professor Borisenko organizes the international conference on physics, chemistry and applications of nanostructures 'Nanomeeting'. His research team focuses on fundamental electronic and optical properties of semiconducting silicides and low-dimensional silicon based nanostructures, carrier transport in semiconductor/dielectric multiquantum wells and DNA, design of novel nanoelectronics and nanophotonic devices, and quantum computing.
Source: Wiley
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