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Posted: September 6, 2009

Biophysical Society names 2010 award recipients

(Nanowerk News) The Biophysical Society is pleased to announce the recipients of its 2010 Society awards. The eight recipients will receive their awards at the Society's 54th Annual Meeting on Monday, February 22, 2010 at the Moscone Convention and Exhibitions Center in San Francisco, California. The awardees are:
Tom A. Rapoport of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Harvard Medical School will receive the Anatrace Membrane Protein Award for providing outstanding mechanistic insights into the processes involved in intracellular protein transport, transport of proteins across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and membrane biogenesis.
James A. Hamilton of the Boston University School of Medicine will receive the Avanti Award in Lipids for his innovative contributions in the application of NMR methods to phospholipids and fatty acids.
Crina Nimigean of Weill Medical College, Cornell University, and Maria Spies of the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign will receive the Margaret Oakley Dayhoff Award. Nimigean was selected for her contributions to our understanding of K+ channel gating and permeation mechanisms. Spies was selected her exemplary research into the mechanisms of DNA repair and the cell cycle maintenance machinery
S. Walter Englander of the University of Pennsylvania will receive the Biophysical Society Founders Award for pioneering the development of hydrogen exchange ("HX") techniques for exploring the stability, interactions and dynamics of macromolecules and their folding.
Mordecai P. Blaustein of the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, will receive the Distinguished Service Award for strengthening the Society—and therefore biophysics—in the United States and throughout the world.
Greta Pifat-Mrzljak of the Ruder Boskovic Institute will receive the Emily M. Gray Award for her outstanding record of accomplishments and leadership of the triennial international summer schools and textbooks on Supramolecular Structure and Function.
Mark J. Schnitzer of Stanford University will receive the Michael and Kate Bárány Award for Young Investigators for his creativity at the interface of biology, physics and engineering.
Jane Clarke of the University of Cambridge will receive the US Genomics Award for Outstanding Investigator in the field of Single Molecule Biology for pioneering the study of the mechanical properties of proteins, protein folding and stability.
The Biophysical Society, founded in 1956, is a professional, scientific society established to encourage development and dissemination of knowledge in biophysics. The Society promotes growth in this expanding field through its annual meeting, monthly journal, and committee and outreach activities. Its 8600 members are located throughout the U.S. and the world, where they teach and conduct research in colleges, universities, laboratories, government agencies, and industry.
Source: Biophysical Society

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