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Posted: Nov 30, 2010

NanoInk Launches New Application for Single Cell Arrays at ASCB Annual Meeting

(Nanowerk News) NanoInk's NanoFabrication Systems Division is pleased to announce the launch of a new application for single cell studies that enables micropatterning of proteins and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based hydrogel at sub cellular scales. The new application note will be available on NanoInk's Web site in the coming weeks. The NanoFabrication Systems Division will also be presenting a poster and exhibiting at the ASCB (American Society for Cell Biology) 50th Annual Meeting, from Sunday, December 12 through Wednesday, December 15, at the Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, Pa.
"The new application demonstrates successful use of the NLP 2000 System to investigate cell response to its microenvironment at single cell levels," said Tom Warwick, general manager, NanoInk's NanoFabrication Systems Division. "We envision that this will enable studies in live single cell arrays, nanotoxicology, developmental biology, tissue engineering, cell physiology, chemotaxis, migration, and mechanotransduction."
Launched in 2009 as a tool for bioscience research, NanoInk's NLP 2000 System is a simple, user-friendly desktop nanolithography platform. The system leverages patented Dip Pen Nanolithography® (DPN®) technology to deposit sub-cellular-scale features of a wide variety of materials with nanoscale registry, all under ambient conditions. With the addition of the new capability to its portfolio of biological research support materials, NanoInk continues to serve as a true partner to the life science community.
NanoInk has successfully demonstrated the patterning of single cells on protein arrays constructed using NanoInk's NLP 2000. Multi-component arrays at sub cellular scales patterned with nanoscale registry have been used to investigate the cellular response at single cell levels. Cell binding areas are constructed using ECM proteins and PEG-based hydrogels are used for targeted delivery of materials to single cells.
ASCB 2010
John M. Collins, Ph.D., NanoInk, will be presenting a poster entitled, "Direct Protein Deposition for Single Cell Analysis" that will show how cells bind to an ECM protein and 'anchor' it over the top of a PEG hydrogel. It will be presented on Tuesday, December 14, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at exhibit halls A/B/C of the Pennsylvania Convention Center. It is program #3144 and board #L381. NanoInk will also be exhibiting at booth #625 where its NLP 2000 System desktop nanolithography platform will be available for demonstrations.
Please visit or call (847) 679-8807 for more information on the NanoFabrication Systems Division, the NLP 2000 System, and related Application Notes.
About NanoInk
NanoInk, Inc. is an emerging growth technology company specializing in nanometer-scale manufacturing and applications development for the life sciences, engineering, pharmaceutical, and education industries. Using Dip Pen Nanolithography® (DPN®), a patented and proprietary nanofabrication technology, scientists are enabled to rapidly and easily create micro-and nanoscale structures from a variety of materials on a range of substrates. This low cost, easy to use and scalable technique brings sophisticated nanofabrication to the laboratory desktop.
Headquartered in the Illinois Science + Technology Park, north of Chicago, NanoInk currently has over 250 patents and applications filed worldwide and licensing agreements with Northwestern University, Stanford University, University of Strathclyde, University of Liverpool, California Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. For more information on products and services offered by NanoInk, Inc., visit
Source: NanoInk
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