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Posted: Feb 09, 2011

Oxford Instruments Offers Environmentally Friendly Low-field NMR Technology to Replace Solvent Extraction

(Nanowerk News) Low-field NMR technology offers an environmentally preferable alternative to solvent extraction, a key technique in research and development laboratory work and quality control tests of oil or fat content of foods and seeds. Oxford Instruments Magnetic Resonance, a leading supplier of low-field benchtop nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) instrumentation is offering businesses the opportunity to test their samples using this green technique at its facility in Concord, Massachusetts, USA and other sites around the world.
Oxford Instruments' range of benchtop NMR instruments provide extremely accurate measurements of oil content without solvents or hazardous chemicals, such as those used in the Soxhlet chemical extraction technique. The use of many of these solvents is rapidly becoming more problematic as companies and institutions face the need to comply with increasingly rigorous international environmental, health and safety standards.
"Low-field NMR is considered a green technique, with none of the safety and environmental issues associated with solvent use and disposal." said Barry Jones, Oxford Instruments' Director of Sales. "It is a very straightforward and simple technique that is fast and easy to use."
Benchtop NMR instruments are generally considered to be environmentally friendly because they do not require the use of solvents, offer extremely low power consumption, and require no consumables.
Additionally, NMR is a time-efficient technology that can typically process samples in 45 seconds to a minute, compared to wet chemistry methods that can take from 6 hours to a day. Further, sample preparation is easy and measurements are non-destructive. It can be used on a range of sample volumes, from 14 milliliters (ml) up to 80ml.
About Oxford Instruments Magnetic Resonance
Oxford Instruments Magnetic Resonance is committed to the development and manufacture of cost-effective instrumentation for industrial quality control, research, and life sciences. The group's expertise is based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology. Today Oxford Instruments is exploring more innovative ways to use benchtop NMR for faster, easier, and safer measurements. Visit www.oxford-instruments.com for more information on the company and its products.
About Oxford Instruments
Oxford Instruments aims to pursue responsible development and deeper understanding of our world through science and technology. We provide high technology tools and systems for industrial and research markets based on our ability to analyze and manipulate matter at the smallest scale. Innovation has been the driving force behind Oxford Instruments' growth and success ever since the business spun out from Oxford University over 50 years ago, and its strategy is still to effect the successful commercialization of these ideas by bringing them to market in a timely and customer-focused fashion. Oxford Instruments is now a global company with over 1,300 staff worldwide and a listing on the London Stock Exchange (OXIG).
Our objective is to be a leading supplier of next generation tools and systems for research and industry. This involves the combination of core technologies in areas such as low temperature and high magnetic field environments, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray electron and optical based metrology, and advanced growth, deposition, and etching. Our products, expertise, and ideas address global issues such as energy, environment, terrorism, and health, and are part of the next generation of telecommunications, energy products, environmental measures, security devices, drug discovery, and medical advances.
Source: Oxford Instruments (press release)
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