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Posted: December 6, 2007

Fuel Cell Catalysts Market Opportunities Strategies and Forecasts 2007 – 2013 Is Out Now

(Nanowerk News) Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/c76572) has announced the addition of Fuel Cell Catalysts Market Opportunities, Strategies, and Forecasts, 2007 to 2013 to their offering.
Mostafa A. El-Sayed at the Georgic Technology Laser Dynamics Laboratory is the undisputed leader in catalyst scientific research. He has been the most articulate scholar and engineer and the most often cited scholar in describing that different shapes of the same metal create different characteristics of the same materials. More work needs to be done to understand the basic science of nanoparticles before fuel cell catalysts can be made to scale commercially.
Mostafa A. El-Sayed Is The Undisputed Leader In Catalyst Scientific Research Mostafa is the most likely to achieve the scientific break through. The effects of different size nanoparticles are still being investigated. Companies are poised to fund more research with him at the Laser Dynamics Laboratory, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology to investigate the impact of shape on material characteristics.
Susie Eustis describes the electromagnetic effect of surface oscillation on nanoparticles. One of the interesting things about nano particles that makes them different from other particles is that there is very little interior, the nanoparticle is mostly surface, creating a different type of entity than a particle with an exterior and interior.
The different shapes of the same material create different characteristics because the electrons are so close to the surface in a very small particle that the behavior of the electrons depends on how soon it hits the edge of the particle more than what type of material chemistry and physics as may be constituted in a larger particle.
In the case of a larger particle that has an interior wall to give the electrons a more consistent way of behaving, the shape of the particle is not so significant as it is in a nanoparticle. Susie Eustis has been a leader in describing that the reason the change of shape affects the characteristics of the metal. Scientific procedures used to observe the surface plasmon resonance absorption are used to discover new materials properties.
Surface plasmon resonance and synthesis procedures for nanoparticles are a basis for discovering more efficient catalysts. Nanoparticle catalysts lower the activation energy of the reaction, and increase the rate of reaction and the yield of the desired products with small amounts of material. Metal nanoparticles generally take advantage of the electromagnetic field enhancement of noble metal nanoparticles resulting from the surface plasmon oscillations, creating variations in nanoparticles characteristics that can be leveraged to achieve better fuel cell catalysts.
The color of metal nanoparticles changes depending on the shape and size of the nanoparticle and dielectric constant of the surrounding medium. The varying characteristics of nanoparticles are needing more investigation before contributing to the basic science in a manner that creates the ability to use nanoparticles for fuel cell catalysts.
The properties of a material are dependent on particle size and shape. Materials on the 1-100nm scale have characteristics relevant to the size and scale. New properties develop on the nanoscale. Lack of symmetry and electron confinement are unique properties of nanoparticles.
The characteristics of nanoparticles do not scale linearly with size, the same material in larger quantity had different characteristics.
According to Susie Eustis in her PhD thesis, The nanometer scale (1-100nm) incorporates collections of atoms or molecules, whose properties are neither those of the individual constituents nor those of the bulk. On this scale, many of the atoms are still located on the surface, or one layer removed from the surface, as opposed to the interior. The interface between substances is just now beginning to be understood. New properties are observed on this scale due to the interface that is not observed in the bulk or individual atoms. Since the properties depend on the size of the structure, instead of just the nature of the material, reliable and continual change can be achieved using a single material.
Source: Research and Markets