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Posted: April 4, 2008

Cambridge nanotechnology guru appointed Chief Scientific Adviser for Ministry of Defence

(Nanowerk News) The UK Prime Minister today named Professor Mark Welland FRS FREng as the new Chief Scientific Adviser at the Ministry of Defence.
Professor Welland, Head of the Nanoscience Group at the Nanoscience Centre and Professor of Nanotechnology at the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge, will take up his new appointment as Chief Scientific Adviser on Monday April 7.
He will continue his innovative research at the University, splitting his time between Cambridge and London.
He succeeds Professor Sir Roy Anderson, who has left to rejoin Imperial College, pending his appointment as Rector this summer.
Secretary of State for Defence, Mr Des Browne said: “I am delighted to welcome Mark Welland as our new Chief Scientific Adviser. His extensive experience and his wide ranging scientific interest, together with his strong links to academia will prove invaluable to his successful tenure in this role.
“I would also like to pay tribute to Professor Sir Roy Anderson FRS whose work as Chief Scientific Adviser has significantly improved the way the MOD’s research programme is developed and managed.”
Vice-Chancellor Professor Alison Richard said: “This is a wonderful opportunity for Mark and we are delighted that he has been recognised with such a prestigious position. He has made, and continues to make, significant contributions to the advancement of nanoscience; and he will be a huge asset as the Ministry of Defence attempts to tackle complex scientific issues.”
Professor Welland said: “I am delighted to have been offered the opportunity to lead Science and Technology within the Ministry of Defence. As CSA I look forward to working with professional and dedicated staff from both the Armed Forces and Civil Service to ensure science contributes fully in supporting the role of the Armed Services.”
Source: University of Cambridge