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Posted: August 5, 2008

Nanotechnology event: Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Seminar

(Nanowerk News) Join the International Association of Nanotechnology, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (CDTSC) on Wednesday, August 13, to provide input on new initiatives and regulations underway concerning nanotechnology.
At the beginning of this year, the USEPA launched its Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program to help provide a firmer scientific foundation for regulatory decisions by encouraging voluntary submission and development of information, including risk management practices for nanoscale materials. The stewardship program encourages participants – including manufacturers – to develop and report data on nanomaterials.
New State laws also provide a mechanism for state agencies to collaborate with chemical manufacturers to develop information such as analytical test methods, fate and transport in the environment, bioconcentration and other relevant information for chemicals manufactured or imported in the State. Under this new law, for instance, manufacturers may be required to provide information about chemical upon the request of that State, within a year of the request.
The State of California is also becoming involved with nanomaterials, including a new regulatory approach the Department of Toxic Substances Control is undertaking to compile relevant information on nanomaterials, as well as other chemicals. Chapter 699, Sections 57018-57020 became part of the Health and Safety Code in California in 2006. This new law provides a mechanism for state agencies to collaborate with chemical manufacturers to develop information such as analytical test methods, fate and transport in the environment, bioconcentration and other relevant information for chemicals manufactured or imported in the State. Included in the law is the requirement that manufacturers shall provide specified information about chemicals of concern within a year of the Department's request."
Jim Alwood, from USEPA’s Chemical Control Division in Washington, D.C., will discuss his agency’s nanotechnology program, including an overview of the Toxic Substances Control Act and the Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program. Dr. Jeff Wong, Chief Scientist for the DTSC, will highlight the main provisions of the new state law and how the Department and the nano industry can work together in implementing it.
Take advantage of this unique opportunity to network and dialogue with industry partners, government representatives and manufacturers as these new rules and regulations are put into place!
Who Should Attend
1. Representatives from companies that manufacture, import, process, or use nanoscale materials for commercial purposes, including those who:
  • Manufacture or import engineered nanoscale materials;
  • Physically or chemically modify or process an engineered nanoscale material;
  • Physically or chemically modify or process a non-nanoscale material to create an engineered nanoscale material; or
  • Use engineered nanoscale materials in the manufacture of a product.
  • 2. Researchers who develop or study engineered nanoscale materials.
    3. Business professionals interested in public policy and potential standards related to nanotechnology.
    Speakers

    Jim Alwood

    Program Manager, Chemical Control Division

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    Jeff Wong

    Chief Scientist, Department of Toxic Substances Control

    California Environmental Protection Agency

    Location

    International Association of Nanotechnology

    1290 Parkmoor Ave,

    San Jose, CA 95126

    More information: http://ianano.org/NanoStewardship.htm
    Source: International Association of Nanotechnology