Open menu

Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Posted: February 12, 2009

Applied Materials Showcases Solar Powered 'Carbon Free' Transportation

(Nanowerk News) Applied Materials, Inc. today conducted a simulation of the “carbon-free” transportation of the future at its Silicon Valley research campus, connecting battery-operated vehicles into the electrical grid utilizing energy generated by the company’s parking lot-based solar array.
The company’s 2-megawatt solar power plant is one of the largest corporate installations in the U.S. The demonstration took place during the U.S.-China Clean Energy Forum held at Applied Materials and was attended by leaders from both nations looking at ways to increase collaboration on renewable energy and alternative fuel projects to improve the environment and promote energy security.
The all-day conference included demonstrations of advanced solutions integrating a parking lot-based solar array, electric vehicles, smart grid technology, energy storage and high-performance battery recharging systems. An afternoon roundtable brought together industry experts on renewable technologies from the U.S. and China, and focused on the opportunities to build clean-tech manufacturing industries and create jobs in both countries.
Applied Materials' Chief Technology Officer Mark Pinto (right) and Han Wenke, Director General of the Energy Research Institute of the National Development and Reform Commission (left) demonstrate an electric vehicle powered by solar energy. Passengers include Saul Zambrano, Director, Clean Air Transportation, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (left) and Hal LaFlash, Director, Emerging Clean Technology Policy, Pacific Gas and Electric Company
Applied Materials' Chief Technology Officer Mark Pinto (right) and Han Wenke, Director General of the Energy Research Institute of the National Development and Reform Commission (left) demonstrate an electric vehicle powered by solar energy. Passengers include Saul Zambrano, Director, Clean Air Transportation, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (left) and Hal LaFlash, Director, Emerging Clean Technology Policy, Pacific Gas and Electric Company.
“This was an excellent opportunity to spotlight some of the best clean energy technology Silicon Valley and the United States have to offer,” said Charlie Gay, president, Applied Solar, Applied Materials. “Both the U.S. and China face similar energy and environmental challenges. By merging solar power with electric vehicles, we also have a tremendous opportunity to develop a cleaner, more sustainable transportation future and help drive the global clean energy economy, while reducing dependence on fossil fuels.”
Today, the U.S. and China together use about half of the total energy consumed in the world and produce a similar share of greenhouse gas emissions. The world’s energy demands are increasing, creating an unprecedented urgency for solutions. In the U.S., oil is primarily used as a transportation fuel, while other fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas are used to generate electricity for the grid. Electrification of transportation offers the potential to drastically reduce oil consumption, and powering vehicles with electricity generated from renewable sources would further contribute to the goals of energy independence and environmental protection.
The U.S.-China Clean Energy Forum is a high-level, private-sector-led forum focused on addressing how the U.S. and China can cooperate on clean energy technologies and alternative fuels. The Forum includes experts in energy, finance and public policy who are cooperating to identify priorities and explore solutions in three broad topical areas: energy conservation and efficiency, environmental protection and renewable energy. Applied Materials is a charter supporter of the Forum.
Source: Applied Materials (press release)
Subscribe to a free copy of one of our daily
Nanowerk Newsletter Email Digests
with a compilation of all of the day's news.
 
 
If you liked this article, please give it a quick review on reddit or StumbleUpon. Thanks!
 
 
These articles might interest you as well: