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Posted: Jul 12, 2012

British Standards Institute launches four new nanotechnology standards

(Nanowerk News) As nanotechnologies begin to play an ever increasingly important role in commercial and consumer products, British Standards Institute (BSI) is working with experts in this field to promote acceptance and adoption of this technology and drive innovation.
Nanostructures are already used in a diverse range of advanced medical devices such as breath analysis sensors for detecting diabetes; low energy-consuming, high-brightness televisions and computer displays; drug delivery systems which combat cancer; high strength, lightweight composites for aircraft; wearable electronics and energy harvesting.
In response to industry’s call to ensure best practice within this emerging industry, BSI has launched four new standards to help mitigate risks involved in manufacture and disposal of such products.
“Standards are the fundamental architecture that supports accelerating organizations to realise their ambitions,” said Shirley Bailey-Wood, Director of Publishing at BSI. “Publication of these new standards confirms BSI’s commitment to maintaining its leadership of standards development for the emerging area of nanotechnologies as we look to integrate standardization earlier in the development cycles of industry.”
The three new Publicly Available Specifications (PAS) in this area are:
  • PAS 134:2012 - Terminology for carbon nanostructures, 2nd edition
  • PAS 138:2012 - Guide to the disposal of manufacturing process waste containing manufactured nano-objects
  • PAS 139:2012 - Detection and characterization of manufactured nano-objects in complex matrices
  • Additionally, a fourth Publicly Available Specifications (PAS) currently in development:
  • PAS 137:2012 – Nanomaterials and nanotechnology-based products – Guide to regulations and standards
  • PAS 134:2012 - Terminology for carbon nanostructures, 2nd edition – is a revised standard to help ensure the use of a consistent language across the widely disparate industries and technologists involved in this area. Dr. Mark Gee from the NPL (National Physical Laboratory said: “Carbon nanostructures are key materials that underpin many sectors of nanotechnology. As with any new dynamic area, there is confusion in vocabulary and terminology that is causing confusion and retarding the adoption of new developments. The publication of this new standard provides a consistent set of terms that will address these issues.”
    PAS 137:2012 (in preparation) - Nanomaterials and nanotechnology-based products – Guide to regulations and standards – aims to provide practical guidance for UK organizations (including SMEs) by signposting regulation and standards relevant to the importation, manufacture, processing, distribution and sale of nanomaterials and nanotechnology-based products, thereby assisting organizations in their business development and commercial success.
    PAS 138:2012 - Guide to the disposal of manufacturing process waste containing manufactured nano-objects - provides clear guidance regarding the disposal of manufactured nanomaterials and objects and will support manufacturers and others in making decisions as to the most appropriate way to dispose of their process waste. Stuart MacLachlan, Sector Leader of the Powders Group, Materials Knowledge Transfer Network, said; “As increasing numbers of products incorporating nanomaterials are made, the need for manufacturers to safely dispose of the process waste also increases. This document will not only be useful to manufacturers of products containing nanomaterials, but also to those involved in waste disposal, research and development on nanomaterials and the regulation or monitoring of waste and waste disposal.”
    PAS 139:2012 - Detection and characterization of manufactured nano-objects in complex matrices –aims to provide guidance to those who wish to detect and characterize nano-objects and those who want to understand their impacts on human and environmental health.. Professor Jamie Lead , Director of FENAC at the University of Birmingham, said: “Deliberately manufactured nano-objects are important technological materials with many benefits but also attendant risks and hazards. In order to better understand possible hazards, it is essential that we can perform the very difficult task of detecting and characterizing these nano-objects in consumer products, in the environment and elsewhere. This PAS should help those who wish to detect and characterize nano-objects and those who want to understand their impacts on human and environmental health.”
    The development of four PAS documents is a clear indication to the market that BSI is aware of the sensitivities surrounding this area and as such is leading the way in driving nano standardization activity in the UK.
    “These new standards will provide a valuable resource to new and established workers in this advanced field and those needing to familiarize themselves with the technical language and regulatory requirements within this important area,” concludes Bailey-Wood.
    For further information on any of these standards or to buy a copy, visit shop.bsigroup.com
    Source: British Standards Institute
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