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Posted: Nov 07, 2012

NanoSight joins the EU Methods List relating to Nanomaterials

(Nanowerk News) NanoSight, providers of unique nanoparticle tracking analysis technology (NTA) welcomes the publication of the European Commission report listing methods currently available for measurement of Nanomaterials, as defined by the EU in 2011.
This report, from the Joint Research Centre of the EU, defining the measurement of nanomaterials is entitled: Requirements on measurements for the implementation of the European Commission definition of the term "nanomaterial", Linsinger T., Roebben G., Gilliland D., Calzolai L., Rossi F., Gibson N., Klein C.(1).
The report follows publication by the European Commission of a recommendation of the term "nanomaterial" for regulatory purposes. The report describes the requirements for particle size measurement issues of nanomaterials based on that definition. It reviews the capabilities of the measurement methods currently available, amongst which is Particle Tracking Analysis (PTA).
Eight methods are discussed, three of which have the number-based methodology which is at the heart of the EU definition(2). These are electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Particle Tracking Analysis.
Dr Patrick Hole, NanoSight's Head of Development, warmly welcomes the report: "This is a balanced and expert review from the team at the IRMM (Institute for Reference Materials and Measurement), providing a clear overview of the issues in particle characterization as well as the methods available. The individual methods sections address directly the match of technology to the definition issues. The onus is now on NanoSight to further address directly the requirements of the definition2 through a combination of broadening the applicability of the technology, developing protocols for specific sample types and working with other suitable techniques in order to provide the definitive characterization solutions."
The report describes PTA as having a number of important advantages including relatively low instrument cost and high sensitivity which can detect nanoparticles at concentrations as low as 106 particles/cm3. It also highlights limitations including lower size detection limit and the inability to distinguish agglomerates and aggregates from primary particles. The report highlights practical examples of the measurement issues that remain to be solved.
Jeremy Warren, NanoSight's CEO comments: "There was never going to be a universal technique or even combination of techniques that would address the myriad of different types of nanoparticles that may be subject to legislation. However, it is important that Particle Tracking Analysis is included on the list. This gives much support to our discussions with cosmetic and food industry scientists as they search for characterization methodologies to meet forthcoming regulation."
References 1 http://publications.jrc.ec.europa.eu/repository/bitstream/111111111/26399/2/irmm_nanomaterials%20%28online%29.pdf
2 http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2011:275:0038:0040:EN:PDF
To find out about NanoSight and to learn more about particle characterization using NanoSight's unique nanoparticle tracking analysisinstrumentation, visit http://www.nanosight.com/ and register to receive the next issue of NanoTrail, the company's electronic newsletter.
Source: NanoSight (press release)

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