Nanotechnology News – Latest Headlines

Robotic jellyfish built on nanotechnology (w/video)

Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and Virginia Tech have created an undersea vehicle inspired by the common jellyfish that runs on renewable energy and could be used in ocean rescue and surveillance missions.

Mar 23rd, 2012

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Quantum copies do new tricks

Researchers showed that it is possible to perfectly recover the original from the imperfect quantum copies. They also proposed a way that his could be done in practice.

Mar 22nd, 2012

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New grant to commercialize novel optofluidic technology

A new class of biomedical diagnostic devices are among the possible uses for the optical sensing technologies developed in Holger Schmidt's lab at UC Santa Cruz. To help Schmidt assess the commercial potential of his work, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded his team a $50,000 Innovation Corps grant.

Mar 22nd, 2012

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Nanoparticles from a fungus could lead to new eco friendly dyes

Researchers working for the EU-funded research project SOPHIED have discovered that a fungus from the Solomon Islands produces special enzymes that act as nano-bio-catalysts. These components help to trigger a chemical reaction between two different basic ingredients and turn it into a dye.

Mar 22nd, 2012

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NT12 abstract submission closes March 23rd

The NT conferences are the most influential meetings focusing on nanotube research and have been held for the past 12 years around the world. The thirteenth will take place in 2012 in Brisbane, Australia.

Mar 22nd, 2012

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Quantum plasmons demonstrated in atomic-scale nanoparticles

Addressing a half-decade-old debate, engineers at Stanford have positively identified the presence of plasmons, the collective oscillations of electrons, in individual metal particles as small as one nanometer in diameter. The discovery could impact nanotechnology.

Mar 21st, 2012

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A groundbreaking, waterless approach to micro-chip making

The tiny, high-speed computer chips found in every modern electronic device bear little resemblance to their bulky, slow ancestors of decades ago. Different materials, new designs and new production techniques have ensured successive generations of integrated circuits offer ever more performance at lower cost. Groundbreaking EU-funded research is helping to continue the trend.

Mar 21st, 2012

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