Nanotechnology News – Latest Headlines

Improving DNA sequencing: Sponge-like biosensor crams enormous power into tiny space

Vanderbilt University engineers have created a "spongy" silicon biosensor that shows promise not only for medical diagnostics, but also for the detection of dangerous toxins and other tiny molecules in the environment. This innovation was originally designed to detect the presence of particular DNA sequences, which can be extremely helpful in identifying whether or not a person is predisposed to heart disease or certain kinds of cancer.

May 26th, 2011

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Virginia Nanoelectronics Center launched

The University of Virginia, in partnership with the College of William and Mary and Old Dominion University, has launched the Virginia Nanoelectronics Center, or ViNC, to advance research aimed at developing next-generation electronics.

May 26th, 2011

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Nanotechnology leads to progress in development of reachargeable batteries

Researchers are testing different ways of improving rechargeable batteries for electric vehicles and nanotechnology plays an important role in the development. The aim is to offer batteries that have fast charge and discharge rates as well as high stored energy per mass. This can make electric vehicles a competitive alternative to petrol-powered vehicles.

May 26th, 2011

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Flexible films for photovoltaics

What do potato chips and thin-film solar cells have in common? Both need films that protect them from air and water vapor: the chips in order to stay fresh and crisp; the solar cells in order to have a useful life that is as long as possible.

May 26th, 2011

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Error prevention, rather than correction, best for future of nanoelectronic devices

In a new study, researchers quantified for the first time these error-suppressing processes for model nanoelectronic systems and estimated the minimum number of electrons necessary for reliable circuit logic. They found that physical fault-tolerance in transistor circuits suppresses the error rate per electron exponentially, while even the most efficient architectural fault-tolerance system only suppresses the error rate subexponentially.

May 25th, 2011

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Electron is surprisingly round, say scientists following 10 year study

Scientists at Imperial College London have made the most accurate measurement yet of the shape of the humble electron, finding that it is almost a perfect sphere. The experiment, which spanned more than a decade, suggests that the electron differs from being perfectly round by less than 0.000000000000000000000000001 cm. This means that if the electron was magnified to the size of the solar system, it would still appear spherical to within the width of a human hair.

May 25th, 2011

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Scientists discover new hitch to link nerve cell motors to their cargo

With every bodily movement - from the blink of an eye to running a marathon - nerve cells transmit signals to muscle cells. To do that, nerve cells rely on tiny molecular motors to transport chemical messengers (neurotransmitters) that excite muscles cells into action. It's a complex process, which scientists are still trying to understand. A new study by Syracuse University researchers has uncovered an important piece of the puzzle.

May 25th, 2011

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Broadening uses put MEMS technology on the map

Until only recently, MEMS devices have been viewed as distant cousins to computer chip technologies and consumer electronics, but with the rapid growth of mobile computing devices like smart phones and tablets, MEMS devices are becoming the indispensable 'eyes and ears' of information technology products.

May 25th, 2011

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