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Uni Bayreuth: Symposium 'Nanostrukturierte Polymere'

Vom 12. bis 13. Oktober 2010 ist die Universitaet Bayreuth Gastgeber des 2. Symposiums 'Nanostrukturierte Polymere'. Die Veranstaltung ist ein Forum fuer den Austausch zwischen Grundlagenforschung und Anwendung im Bereich der Polymere und Kolloide.

Aug 30th, 2010

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Protein bio-encapsulation and adsorption in hydrophobic nanoporous silica-based sol-gel glasses to mimic and probe the enhancement of protein folding

Researchers at Fluorotronics, Inc. (San Diego, USA) have enlightened the role of hydrophobic surfaces in the enhancement of proteins folding. They say that organic-inorganic nanoporous silica sol-gel glasses constitute the ideal support for protein bioencapsulation and adsorption, and to study the different factors influencing the protein folding process in a crowded environment.

Aug 30th, 2010

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Vulnerability in commercial quantum cryptography

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology and the University of Erlangen-Nuernberg together with the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light in Erlangen have recently developed and tested a technique exploiting imperfections in quantum cryptography systems to implement an attack.

Aug 29th, 2010

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A new design for a gravimeter

Scientists have developed a novel design for a highly compact, ultra-sensitive quantum device to measure subtle changes in gravity over very short time or distance scales.

Aug 27th, 2010

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Menschliche Proteinfabriken in 3D - Einblicke ins Innere menschlicher Zellen auf Nanoebene

Wer in der Zelle fuer die Bildung von Proteinen zustaendig ist, ist dank der zellbiologischen Forschung bereits bekannt. Aber wie diese Proteinfabriken (Ribosomen) innerhalb der Zelle organisiert sind, ist bisher nicht umfassend erforscht. Kuerzlich ist es Wissenschaftlern am Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biochemie gelungen, das Innenleben einer intakten menschlichen Zelle mittel Kryo-Elektronentomographie dreidimensional abzubilden.

Aug 27th, 2010

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Magnets with a twist

The first direct observation of an unusual magnetic structure could lead to novel electronic and magnetic memory devices.

Aug 27th, 2010

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Stretched polymer snaps back smaller than it started

Crazy bands are cool because no matter how long they've been stretched around a kid's wrist, they always return to their original shape, be it a lion or a kangaroo. Now a Duke and Stanford chemistry team has found a polymer molecule that's so springy it snaps back from stretching much smaller than it was before.

Aug 26th, 2010

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Prediction of intrinsic magnetism at silicon surfaces could lead to single-spin magnetoelectronics

The integration of single-spin magnetoelectronics into standard silicon technology may soon be possible, if experiments confirm a new theoretical prediction by physicists at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The researchers predict that a family of well-known silicon surfaces, stabilized by small amounts of gold atoms, is intrinsically magnetic despite having no magnetic elements.

Aug 26th, 2010

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A peek into the future of cell imaging

The imaging tools developed so far by the European ENCITE project should improve monitoring of cell therapy and improve the understanding of the fate of transplanted cells and the mechanism of action of cell-based therapies. Using the knowledge obtained in these studies, tools and treatment strategies can be further optimised to reap the full benefit of cell-based therapies.

Aug 26th, 2010

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Secrets of the gecko foot help robot climb

The science behind gecko toes holds the answer to a dry adhesive that provides an ideal grip for robot feet. Stanford mechanical engineer Mark Cutkosky is using the new material, based on the structure of a gecko foot, to keep his robots climbing.

Aug 26th, 2010

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