Nanotechnology News – Latest Headlines

New insights from the nano world: Direct observation of carbon monoxide binding

Carbon monoxide is highly toxic since it blocks the binding site for oxygen in hemoglobin. This very principle - a porphyrin ring with a central iron or cobalt atom that the poisonous gas attaches to - can be used to implement sensors to warn against carbon monoxide. Physicists have now deciphered the mechanism for binding of gas molecules to iron and cobalt porphyrins.

Jan 10th, 2011

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Nano-contact experiment clarifies role of electrons during friction

Is friction dominated by electrons or by lattice vibrations? A nano-contact experiment shows that on a Nb surface friction drops by a factor of three when crossing the superconductivity transition, showing that it has essentially an electronic nature in the metallic state, whereas the phononic contribution dominates in the superconducting state.

Jan 10th, 2011

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NSF launches an Engineering Research Center to develop smart lighting

The National Science Foundation (NSF) announces an award to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and its partners to establish a new NSF Engineering Research Center (ERC). The ERC will develop interdisciplinary research and education programs that address an important societal need and provide the foundation for new industries through innovation. NSF will invest $18.5 million in the Center over the next five years.

Jan 7th, 2011

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Spinning information for better memory

Scientists have now shown that the spin of atomic nuclei in silicon can store information for over a minute and that the information can then be read out electrically, an important step in linking spintronics with classical electronics.

Jan 7th, 2011

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Expitaxial graphene shows promise for replacing silicon in electronics

With silicon device fabrication approaching its physical limits, many researchers believe graphene can provide a new platform material that would allow the semiconductor industry to continue its march toward ever-smaller and faster electronic devices -- progress described in Moore's Law. Though graphene will likely never replace silicon for everyday electronic applications, it could take over as the material of choice for high-performance devices.

Jan 7th, 2011

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Researchers settle argument over mobility of flexible filaments

Researchers have settled a long-standing controversy in the field of polymer dynamics: The researchers proved once and for all that Theo Odijk at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands was correct in proclaiming that a little flexibility goes a long way for stiff filaments in a solution.

Jan 6th, 2011

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