Nanotechnology PhD and Doctorate Degree Programs

 

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CNSE's Nanoscale Science program provides the critical theoretical and experimental skill base and know-how for knowledge creation in the areas of nanoscale materials, structures, and architectures.
Plans are currently underway to develop graduate curricula leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in NanoEngineering by 2011. Until NanoEngineering graduate programs are in place, students wishing to pursue nanoengineering as a graduate focus are encouraged to apply to related graduate programs in bioengineering, chemical engineering, and mechanical and aerospace engineering. Transfer to NanoEngineering will be considered upon approval of its degree programs.
The PhD programme is based on courses, practicals and projects in Year 1 before selection of an interdisciplinary PhD topic for research in Years 2-4 in a Nano group within Physics, Chemistry, Engineering, Materials or another department. A significant element will be a Management of Technology Innovation (MoTI) component provided through the Judge Business School.
The university's nanoscience bachelor (in Danish).
EPSRC CDT in the Science and Applications of Graphene and Related Nanomaterials (GrapheneNOWNANO) is a newly established Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) based at the University of Manchester in partnership with Lancaster University. It builds on the world-leading expertise in the science and technology of graphene and other two-dimensional (2D) materials at Manchester and Lancaster to offer a broad interdisciplinary CDT.
This exciting program bridges the distinct properties of the nanoscale to microsystem functionality. The integrated academic and research activities highlight our capabilities and unique breadth in materials synthesis and self-assembly, nanolithography, interrogative platforms, and functional micro/macrosystems.
The Ph.D. in Nanoscale Science at UNC Charlotte is an interdisciplinary program that addresses the development, manipulation, and use of materials and devices on the scale of roughly 1-100 nanometers in length, and the study of phenomena that occur on this size scale. The program prepares students to become scholarly, practicing scientists who possess the critical thinking, methodological, and communication skills required to advance and disseminate knowledge of fundamental and applied nanoscale science.
The degree follows the same syllabus as the BSc Physics programme with an introduction to nanoscience and other cutting-edge research provided by the Frontiers in Physics module. In year two you will again pursue the same core as for the BSc Physics course but will also take the Force and Function at the Nanoscale, and Molecular Bio- and Nanophysics modules (which replace two of the optional modules of the core course).
The primary aim of establishing the Centre for Converging Technologies (CCT) is to produce high quality research in the four streams of Nanotechnology, Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, Information and Communication Technology, Cognitive & Neuroscience so as to create new scientific methodologies, engineering paradigms, and industrial products. The focus will be on key areas relevant to the desired rapid growth of the Indian economy.
The graduate research programmes of the Twente Graduate School are set up as a coherent and integrated master and doctorate course that runs over a period of five to at most six years leading to a PhD degree.
High priority research area focussing on fundamental and applied research associated with Health and sustainable technologies.
After admission to a participating department, graduate students can apply for our 'Option Ph.D. in Nanotechnology' program. Fulfillment of both departmental and Nanotechnology Program requirements will lead to a Ph. D. in Nanotechnology and the chosen discipline.
A PhD program in nanotechnology.
The new program, which was developed by faculty in the VCU Departments of Chemistry and Physics, is designed to cross-train students in the physical sciences of chemistry and physics with particular focus on how the science changes at reduced dimensions. There is a potential for other departments to become more involved as the program develops.