Nanotechnology Research Laboratories

 

Showing results 421 - 435 of 683 for research and community organizations in USA:

 
The research of the Dai Laboratory at Stanford interfaces with chemistry, physics, materials science and biophysics. Ongoing projects include developing new synthetic routes to ordered nanomaterial architectures; electrical, mechanical, electromechanical and electrochemical characterizations at the nanoscale; and probing the real-space structures and functions of biological molecules.
The group is interested in the theoretical and computational research of photonic crystals, micro-photonic and nano-photonic structures, as well as solid state devices.
A biophysics lab that investigates biological spatial organization on the mesoscale (10 nm - 10 microns) and the role of mechanical cues in cellular decision-making. Current research directions include tissue mechanobiology, the organization of the DNA inside the nucleus, and single-molecule measurements of transport through biological pores and channels.
The group's research is at the intersection of experimental condensed matter physics and nanoscale science and technology. Their efforts involve local probes, nanoassembly, collective phenomena, spin/charge manipulation, reduced-dimensional systems, and single quanta physics.
The Micro/Nano Systems and Technology Graduate Certificate offers a plan of study that focuses on the miniaturization technologies that have important roles in materials, mechanical, and biomedical engineering practice, in addition to being the foundation for information technology.
Single-molecule nanophotonics at Stanford University
The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) was established as an inter-disciplinary program to bring together scientists and physicians who share a common interest in developing and using state-of-the-art imaging technology and developing molecular imaging assays for studying intact biological systems.
The Stanford Nanoelectronics Group was founded in September 2004 by Professor H.-S. Philip Wong. The group's research interests are in nanoscale science and technology, semiconductor technology, solid state devices, and electronic imaging.
The objective of this project is to develop optimized nanocomposite materials for high-density H2 reversible storage applications.
Research areas: nanophotonics, quantum optics, nonlinear optics, optoelectronics
The Nanoscale Materials Science Graduate Certificate offers an opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills needed to understand the present and potential applications of these rapidly developing nano-materials technologies.
The Quantum Information Science group at Stanford University, lead by Professor Yoshihisa Yamamoto, conducts the basic research on quantum optics, semiconductor mesoscopic physics, nuclear and electron spin resonance, with emphasis on quantum information system applications.
The major research interests of the group are the design, fabrication, characterization and applications of various active nanostructures such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanojunctions and nanotrees. The active materials currently under exploration include piezoelectric, piezoresistive or conductive, thermal electric and photovoltaic materials. The targeted applications of the various nanostructures developed are acoustic sensors for structural health monitoring, medical devices for thrombus retrieving, nanoacoustic waves for circulating cancer cell screening, chemical sensors for various gases and explosives, biosensors for stroke diagnostics, and energy scavenging involving mechanical-electric, thermoelectric, optoelectric and chemical-electric energy conversions.
Participation in the Nanotechnology Graduate Program leads to Masters of Science, Masters of Engineering, and Doctor of Philosophy in the respective disciplines with a designated nanotechnology concentration. To qualify for the nanotechnology concentration, in addition to satisfying disciplinary core requirements, candidates for Masters' degrees must complete the common core and a minimum of three elective courses and should attend regularly the seminar series in the Nanotechnology Curriculum.
Participation in the Nanotechnology Graduate Program leads to Masters of Science, Masters of Engineering, and Doctor of Philosophy in the respective disciplines with a designated nanotechnology concentration. To qualify for the nanotechnology concentration, in addition to satisfying disciplinary core requirements, candidates for Masters' degrees must complete the common core and a minimum of three elective courses and should attend regularly the seminar series in the Nanotechnology Curriculum.
 
 
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