Open menu

Nanotechnology Research in New York

 

Showing results 31 - 45 of 52 for research and community organizations in New York:

 
Nanoscience and materials at NYU includes fullerene derivatization studies, chiral sensors and triggered materials, peptide nanotechnology; peptide surface interactions, molecular imaging agents, and proteins containing unnatural amino acids.
The mission of the Center, housed within the Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center (RNC), is to integrate research, education, and technology dissemination, and serve as a national resource for fundamental knowledge and applications, in directed assembly of nanostructures.
The Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery and Exploration (INDEX) - one of just four such nanoelectronics research institutes in the country ? is located at CNSE's Albany NanoTech complex. The INDEX institute focuses on cutting-edge research in the field of nanotechnology, including the development of nanomaterials, fabrication technologies, nanochip designs and architectural integration schemes for realizing the computer nanochip designs of the future.
The CCNI is designed both to help continue the impressive advances in shrinking device dimensions seen by electronics manufacturers, and to extend this model to a wide array of industries that could benefit from nanotechnology.
The research focus of this NSF-funded Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) for Directed Assembly of Nanostructures is to discover and develop the means to assemble nanoscale building blocks with unique properties into functional structures under well-controlled, intentionally directed conditions. Their overall mission is to integrate research, education, and technology dissemination to serve as a national and international resource for fundamental knowledge and applications in directed assembly of nanostructures.
Building upon the Institute's traditional strengths in materials science and engineering, Rensselaer researchers are part of a pre-eminent group of scientists around the world working to manipulate matter with atomic precision. With an NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center on campus, a new microelectronics clean room capable of fabrication on the nano-level, and a talented group of biotechnology researchers bringing nano-capabilities to their work, Rensselaer has taken a place at the heart of what has been framed by some as the next 'industrial revolution'.
The Center is primarily involved with fundamental nanotechnology research in materials, devices and systems. By combining computational design with experimentation the Center's researchers are discovering novel pathways to assemble functional multiscale nanostructures with junctions and interfaces between structurally, dimensionally, and compositionally different nanoscale building blocks to create useful hierarchical material systems.
The group's research focuses on fundamental as well as applied aspects of quantum theory. Since quantum effects are usually pronounced when thermal disturbances are low, our research has a significant overlap with low temperature physics. Specifically, they are interested in laser-cooled atoms and molecules, cryogenically or radiatively cooled nanomechanics, and superconductors.
As part of RIT's Microsystems Engineering Ph.D. Program, the 'epitaxially-integrated nanoscale systems' (EINS) lab focuses on applied physics and engineering at the nanometer scale. At the center of the group's research is the atomic-level assembly or epitaxy of III-V compound semiconductors by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD).
The NanoPower Research Labs at RIT are dedicated to the development of new materials and devices for power generation and storage for microelectronic components and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).
The multidisciplinary program builds on the fundamentals of traditional engineering and science, combined with curriculum and research activities addressing the numerous technical challenges of micro- and nano-systems. These include the manipulation of electrical, photonic, optical, mechanical, chemical, and biological functionality to process, sense, and interface with the world at a nanometer scale. The goal is to provide the foundation to explore future technology through research in nano-engineering, design methods, and technologies for micro- and nano-scaled systems.
The mission of the Nanoscale Materials Technology program is to provide students a foundation in materials science, chemistry, physics, mathematics, and electronics. With strong supporting courses in Computer Aided Drafting, Vacuum Science and Technology, and Thin Film Deposition Techniques, students will be prepared for employment as highly qualified technicians in the emerging and highly technical semiconductor and superconductor manufacturing and research and development field.
The SMALLab deals with Small Tech, such as BioMEMS, microfluidics, and nanobiotechnology to build various nanobiosensors and microactuators.
The REN group works on the forefront of material science and nanotechnology, including materials-by-design, synthesis and self-assembly of emerging multifunctional materials with an emphasis on novel magnetic, electronic and excitonic properties for energy-critical applications. They are committed to realizing our vision by focusing on three main thrusts: (1) Self-assembly of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for unusual magnetic and electronic properties; (2) Two-dimensional organic materials for energy transduction; (3) Rare-earth-free high energy density nanomagnets.
This first-of-its-kind dual degree program provides pioneering education and training in both medicine and nanoscale science research, preparing a new generation of professionals for exciting 21st century careers as world-class research physicians in the emerging science and practice of nanomedicine.