Nanotechnology Research – Universities

 

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NEWT headquarters are at Rice University, but this interdisciplinary nanosystems engineering research center includes Arizona State University, University of Texas at El Paso and Yale University. They use nanotechnology to develop water treatment systems of all kinds.
NEWT is applying nanotechnology to develop transformative and off-grid water treatment systems that both protect human lives and support sustainable economic development.
The worlds of science and business are merging and a new breed of scientist, manager and policy maker is emerging. These new professionals are PSM graduates who can serve companies in today's competitive market needing managers with scientific knowledge who understand the business world and can effectively lead by applying their unique background to their organization's needs. In response to these needs, the Wiess School of Natural Sciences established the Professional Master's Program, offering a degree in Nanoscale Physics.
The Institute's mission is to provide a venue where researchers from all disciplines of science and engineering can come together to share ideas and discuss their views and prospects of nanoscience, nanoengineering, and nanotechnology.
The Tour group at Rice University. Scientific research areas include molecular electronics, chemical self-assembly, conjugated oligomers, electroactive polymers, combinatorial routes to precise oligomers, polymeric sensors, flame retarding polymer additives, carbon nanotube modification and composite formation, synthesis of molecular motors and nanotrucks, use of the NanoKids concept for K-12 education in nanoscale science.
The group's research focuses on the development of functional oxides based thin film devices utilizing photonic, electronic, and magnetic properties; the fabrication of conducting oxide based superstructure and their potential investigation as thermoelectric materials; the development of special epitaxial growth method; and the development of novel oxide spintronics devices.
The group explores advanced molecular photonics based on semiconducting quantum dots, photofunctional organic molecules, and laser manipulation techniques.
The group's research focuses on plasmonics for photochemistry and photophysics, including following sub-topics: Plasmonic Waveguiding; Single Molecule Studies; Plasmon Associated Energy Harvesting; Drug Delivery System based on Plasmonics.
Researchers in the lab are involved in a variety of research aimed at integrating and combining top-down and bottom-up phenomena.
The lab is researching inorganic optical material with its robust frame structure, and are conducting research on the expression of optical functions through formation of nanostructures on the surface.
Nanochemistry and materials - plasma and powders.
Research includes: Three-dimensional multi-layered tera byte optical storage with gold nano-particles; Chiral nanophotonics; Near-field Vibrational Nanophotonics; Plasmonic Band Gap Devices; Plasmonic Metamaterials; Metallic Nanolens.
This four year program combines majors in nanotechnology and either physics or chemistry and encompasses physical, chemical, biological and engineering nanoscience and nanotechnology. This double degree provides a strong grounding in nanotechnology, the science and engineering of materials less than a micrometer in size across the disciplines of physics and chemistry with substantial biology and engineering components.
The Centre for Advanced Materials and Industrial Chemistry (CAMIC) is a multidisciplinary centre that strives to undertake high quality fundamental and applied research. The interconnected research themes in the centre allow materials scientists, nanotechnologists and applied scientists with industrial experience to undertake ambitious research projects from conception to real world implementation.
The Laboratory of Artificial Intelligence Nanophotonics develops nanophotonic devices inspired by ideas from artificial intelligence and brain science for a smarter and greener future.
Current activities in the laboratory center around micro/nano-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS/NEMS) and micro/nanofluidics.
The group's research focuses on fundamental as well as applied aspects of quantum theory. Since quantum effects are usually pronounced when thermal disturbances are low, our research has a significant overlap with low temperature physics. Specifically, they are interested in laser-cooled atoms and molecules, cryogenically or radiatively cooled nanomechanics, and superconductors.
As part of RIT's Microsystems Engineering Ph.D. Program, the 'epitaxially-integrated nanoscale systems' (EINS) lab focuses on applied physics and engineering at the nanometer scale. At the center of the group's research is the atomic-level assembly or epitaxy of III-V compound semiconductors by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD).
The NanoPower Research Labs at RIT are dedicated to the development of new materials and devices for power generation and storage for microelectronic components and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).
The multidisciplinary program builds on the fundamentals of traditional engineering and science, combined with curriculum and research activities addressing the numerous technical challenges of micro- and nano-systems. These include the manipulation of electrical, photonic, optical, mechanical, chemical, and biological functionality to process, sense, and interface with the world at a nanometer scale. The goal is to provide the foundation to explore future technology through research in nano-engineering, design methods, and technologies for micro- and nano-scaled systems.
The group studies the structure, dynamics and interactions of biomolecules in model systems.
The activity of the group focuses on two main areas. On the one hand, the Group develops and applies new chemometric techniques related to the validation of analytical methodologies. On the other hand, the second main activity of the Group is the transfer of knowledge and technology.
The main aim of the Master's Degree is to provide students with solid, interdisciplinary training that will make it possible to respond to the challenges of scientific and technological development. Students will learn about new tools for fabricating, nanohandling and characterizing materials, devices and systems of nanometric size that are necessary for undertaking experimental work.
The group works on modeling and design of linear and nonlinear photonic crystals; the development of technologies based on the macroporous ordered silicon and on the nanoporous silicon for the production of 1D and 2D photonic crystals; and the development of physical models for advanced electronic devices: Thin-film transistors, nanometric-sized MOSFETs, silicon-based heterojunction devices.
Multidisciplinary basic research into the nature and limits to self-organization in combinatorially complex chemical systems. Electronic micro-and nanosystems provide controlled and programmable environments for studying and optimizing such systems, and so our research is also forging a link between the three rapidly expanding technologies: Information Technology (IT), Biotechnology (BT) and Nanotechnology (NT).