Nanotechnology Research – Universities

 

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The following Technion academic units participate in this interdisciplinary program: Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, Medicine, Materials Engineering and Bio-medical Engineering.
Nanoelectronics- characterization and fabrication.
Tel Aviv University has launched the first interdisciplinary university research institute for nanoscience and nanotechnology in Israel, with a multimillion investment. Over 40 groups actively conduct leading research in electronics, physics, chemistry, biotech and medicine, developing more than 85 specific and interdisciplinary projects.
The main focus of the group is single-molecule genomics but they have activity also in development of new optical detection schemes and novel imaging techniques. They explore genomes utilizing tools and reagents from the realm of nano-technology. The team try learning new things about these systems by zooming in on individuals - single cells, single chromosomes and single molecules.
Combining the nano research at A&M.
The group's research spans diverse fields, including materials science, chemistry, stem cells biology and additive biomanufacturing. Specifically, the lab is developing biomimetic nanomaterials with native interface tissue-like gradient in physical and chemical properties, integrating advanced micro- and nano- fabrication technologies to mimic native interface tissue architecture and directing stem cell behavior to obtain regionalized tissue constructs in vitro and in vivo.
The PNC Lab is the research group of Professor Jaime Grunlan and is interested in nanostructure and microstructure of particle-polymer systems.
The center's Nanoscale Materials and Applications has programs in nanomagnetics, inorganic nanomaterials, binano materials, and organic films nanocomposites.
The Nanomaterials Application Center coordinates, facilitates, and participates in nanoscience and nanoengineering applications and expedites commercialization of inventions.
MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms is an ambitious interdisciplinary initiative that is looking beyond the end of the Digital Revolution to ask how a functional description of a system can be embodied in, and abstracted from, a physical form.
The lab's main interest lies in the studies of physical and chemical phenomena that take place in nanometer-scale regions as well as the applications of such phenomena in photo-electronic devices.
Research activities at the Ohno Lab cover the areas of preparation, characterization and application of compound semiconductor quantum structures for high speed devices.
The group has been developing the methods for explicating the determinant factors of physical properties of nano-particles, thin film materials, and materials used for micro structures.
The center consists of several individual research groups and labs that deal with nano-related research.
The Samukawa Lab conducts research on ways to generate charged particles (positive and negative ions, electrons) and neutral particles (atoms/molecules) and associated acceleration technologies (including beam technologies), as well as research on particle flow and the latest bio-nano processes.
MNTC encompasses all fields from molecular level mechanism analysis to medical application. Specifically, MNTC's research focuses on functional ultra-thin polymer films (films with thickness of under 100 nm). The cooperative medical, physics, and engineering organization utilizes the features unique to the 'structure of the plane' created when polymers are formed into ultra-thin films, and applies these to medical technologies.
In the lab of Cagdas Allahverdi, the group is producing II-VI and V-VI group semiconductors whose average sizes are below 100 nm. Their aim is to create applications using these nanomaterials in the future.
This laboratory is focuses on the dynamics and kinetics of interacting biomolecules, the mechanics of protein imported to mitochondria membranes, the kinetics of molecular motors under external strain and the nanomechanical action at ribosomal complexes during translation.
For their projects, the group designs miniaturized nano-enabled sensors for the health and the environment; low power circuits that can operate at a fraction of a volt; imagers that can see the invisible terahertz band and even detect fluorescence (lifetime) that vanish in less than a nanosecond.
Work on optical sensing arrays
The center on Functional Engineered Nano Architectonics (FENA) aims to create and investigate new nano-engineered functional materials and devices, and novel structural and computational architectures for new information processing systems beyond the limits of conventional CMOS technology.
The Center for Cell Control is working on an unprecedented approach to first utilize systems control, with therapeutic intent, to determine the parameters for guiding the cell to a directed phenotype/genotype which will then be followed by in depth study, using nanoscale modalities, of the path by which this desired state is achieved. This approach will enable engineering systems that can be applied towards the regulation of a spectrum of cellular functions, such as cancer eradication, controlling viral infection onset, and stem cell differentiation.
The Nanoelectronics Research Facility is part of the Elecetrical Engineering Department at the University of California, Los Angeles.
The Photonics Laboratory at UCLA performs multi-disciplinary research and development in the fields of silicon photonics, microwave photonics, and biophotonics for biomedical and defense applications. The Lab has two complementary missions. The first is to solve critical problems faced by defense, commercial industries, and medicine through innovative approaches that enable revolutionary advances in devices or systems. The second and equally important mission is to produce creative and highly skilled scientists and engineers who will be the driving force for technological innovation in the 21st century.
Research in the group focuses around two intertwined goals. These are first, to create complex materials with nanoscale periodicity using self-organization, and second, to produce new physical properties because of that nanoscale architecture.