Nanotechnology Research – Universities

 

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This program is comprised of three major components: arts and sciences, electrical engineering technology, and free electives. The electrical engineering technology component consists of core and concentration requirements in addition to electrical technology elective credits.
Der Studiengang Bio- und Nanotechnologien fasst die Schlüsseltechnologien Biotechnologie, Umwelttechnik, Nano- und Oberflächentechnik zusammen.
Nanotechnology is a specialisation within a Bachelor of Science (Honours). This specialisation is also available within the 3 year Bachelor of Science.
Nanotechnology is a specialisation within a Bachelor of Science. This specialisation is also available within the 4 year Bachelor of Science (Honours). This degree will equip you to be a part of this new industrial revolution. You will graduate ready to start working in a variety of scientific professions and to play a leading role in the future as nanotechnology grows, matures and reveals its full potential. Nanotechnology draws on the strengths of all the basic sciences and the course will give you a strong background in these sciences. In particular, there is an emphasis on developing computational skills and an awareness of the roles and uses of computers in science and society. From Second Year you will choose to specialise in one of two areas: Biomedical Nanotechnology; Quantum Nanostructures.
Students will develop the capacity to understand the basic scientific concepts underpinning nanoscience and the properties of materials and biomaterials at the atomic/molecular level and the scaling laws governing these properties. They will understand current frontier developments in nanotechnology, and recognise and develop novel and innovative ideas using a range of laboratory methods, specifically the fabrication and characterisation tools used in nanotechnology such as various microscopies, surface modifications and molecular level construction methods.
The Institute's mission is to apply world-class, fundamental research and knowhow to provide novel, robust solutions to the challenges facing Australia, in the general areas of energy, health and water.
Students will develop the capacity to understand the basic scientific concepts underpinning nanoscience and the properties of materials and biomaterials at the atomic/molecular level and the scaling laws governing these properties. They will understand current frontier developments in nanotechnology, and recognise and develop novel and innovative ideas using a range of laboratory methods, specifically the fabrication and characterisation tools used in nanotechnology such as various microscopies, surface modifications and molecular level construction methods.
The mission of AMERI is to enable the development of future technologies by combining open-access, and state-of-the-art analytical/fabrication tools with innovative research ideas from award-winning faculty and industry across South Florida and throughout the world.
The High-Performance Materials Institute at Florida State University is the pioneer in the process for manufacturing of carbon nanotube 'buckypapers'. The center has other research on-going in areas of nanotube systhesis, growth and nanocomposites.
INSI is an interdisciplinary initiative at Florida State University to foster a world-class program in the exciting emergent area of bio-nanoscience. The initiative builds on a solid foundation in bio-nanoscience at FSU that evolved from existing strengths in materials science, molecular and cell biology, chemical and biomedical engineering, chemistry and biochemistry, and physics.
FriMat combines a leading fundamental research program on soft condensed matter and solid state physics with an innovative approach to synthesize novel compounds in order to create and study advanced materials. FriMat is determined to not only focus on the creation of novel materials and promote nanotechnology, but investigates into potential risks associated with nanoparticles, and develops new tools essential in any attempt to sample and characterize nanoparticles in the environment.
This MURI project at Georgia Tech is focused on a revolutionary new paradigm for fabricating micro/nanodevices: the synergistic use of genetic engineering, biological replication, and shape-preserving chemical conversion to generate enormous numbers of identical Genetically-Engineered Micro/nanodevices (GEMs) with tailored 3-D shapes, fine (meso-to-nanoscale) features, and chemistries.
The Mason Nanotechnology Initiative opens a space for discussion and planning of activities related to nanoscience and nanotechnology within Mason. The efforts target the development of new academic programs within the university that contain a strong component of subjects in science, mathematics and engineering, which are fundamental to nanoscience and nanotechnology.
The focus of research of this group is the synthesis, study and application of solid-state inorganic materials with technologically significant magnetic, electrical, optical, electrochemical or catalytic properties. Of particular interest are nanoscale (1 - 20 nm diameter) materials.
The CNCF in the School of Materials Science and Engineering, is a multi-user facility. Its mission is to provide the Georgia Tech campus with state-of-the-art tools for performing advanced research on a variety of nanoscale materials.
COPE is a premier national research and educational resource center that creates flexible organic photonic and electronic materials and devices that serve the information technology, telecommunications, energy, and defense sectors. COPE creates the opportunity for disruptive technologies by developing new materials with emergent properties and by providing new paradigms for device design and fabrication.
Since 2001 and the invention of graphene electronics the Georgia Tech epitaxial graphene research team led by Walt de Heer and its collaborators are developing the new field of epitaxial graphene electronics.
Dr. Filler's research group works at the interface of chemical engineering and materials science, emphasizing the atomic-level engineering of nanoscale semiconductors for applications in energy conversion, electronics, and photonics.
The Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology (IEN) at Georgia Tech was established as an Interdisciplinary Research Institute (IRI) with the goals of providing a central entry point and a central organization to enable interdisciplinary E&N related training, education, and research at Georgia Tech in partnership with outside entities.
The mission of the group is to advance the science and engineering of organic and hybrid nanostructured materials and enable technological innovations for applications in communications, sensing, displays, energy efficient solid-state lighting, and power generation.
The group's research focuses on nanostructured functional materials (NanoFM), including polymer-based nanocomposites, block copolymers, polymer blends, conjugated polymers, quantum dots (rods, tetrapods, wires), magnetic nanocrystals, metallic nanocrystals, semiconductor metal oxide nanocrystals, ferroelectric nanocrystals, multiferroic nanocrystals, upconversion nanocrystals, thermoelectric nancrystals, core/shell nanocrystals, hollow nanocrystals, Janus nanocrystals, nanopores, nanotubes, hierarchically structured and assembled materials, and semiconductor organic-inorganic nanohybrids. The goal of the research is to understand the fundamentals of these nanostructured materials.
The mission of Prof. Gleb Yushin's group is to develop innovative nanotechnology-driven solutions that would facilitate a cleaner environment, decreased energy consumption, safer and healthier lives for people around the globe, and other benefits to society. The group's current focus is directed towards the synthesis of innovative nanostructured materials for supercapacitors, fuel cells and batteries.
The Xia group is pursuing cutting-edge research in three major frontiers: nanotechnology, materials chemistry, and photonic devices. Recently, the group starts to move into cell biology by harnessing the power of nanomaterials to develop novel tools for studying complex biological systems.
Zhong L. Wang's research group at Georgia Institute of Technology focuses on the fundamental science in the physical and chemical processes in nanomaterials growth, unique properties of nanosystems, novel in-situ measurement techniques, and new applications of nano-scale objects.
The Centre brings together many different research groups working in engineering and the physical and life sciences. The Centre has comprehensive micro and nanofabrication facilities including one of the most advanced large area high resolution electron beam lithography tools in the world.