Nanotechnology Videos

Our "NanoTube" collection of informative and noteworthy videos
in the areas of nanosciences and nanotechnology

1 - 10 of 18 in category Carbon materials:
 
Bending of multiwalled carbon nanotube
Source: NASA Ames Research Center
Carbon nanotube based are expected to provide extraordinarily strong but light-weight composites for future structural applications. To realize these applications, we first need to know a lot more about these materials: especially, how strong is this nanotube? How stiff? What happens if you bend it? Twist it? Stretch it? Compress it? This clip shows the simulation of a multiwall nanotube undergoing bending.

C60, the celestial sphere that fell to earth
Source: Vega Science Trust
Harry Kroto recorded in 1995. In 1985 an experiment, designed to unravel the carbon chemistry in Red Giant Stars, revealed the existence of C60 Buckminsterfullerene (the third allotropic form of carbon). The story of the discovery and the way its symmetry relates to the natural and physical world are described. This elegant cage molecule which has the same shape as a football heralds a new era of novel 21st Century Materials.

Carbon nanotube production
Source: IFW Dresden
The production steps leading to carbon nanotubes are explained and demonstrated in this video from the IWF in Dresden, Germany.

Carbon nanotube punching hole in lower terrace of silicon
Source: NASA Ames Research Center
A carbon nanotube can be used as a tip in an atomic force microscope (AFM). Such a tip in an AFM can be used to create nanoscale patterns i.e. nanolithograpghy or to etch material away from a surface in the fabrication of semiconductor chips(i.e. the tip acts like a " nanotweezer " to remove atoms from the surface). This clip shows the real-time dynamics of interaction between carbon nanotube tip and silicon - the nanotube tip is able to selectively extract several silicon atoms off the surface of silicon.

Carbon Nanotubes
Source: YouTube
A brief video explaining what a carbon nanotube is and what they might bring to future technologies. Audio from Earth & Sky, produced for Too Small To See.

Compression of a multiwalled carbon nanotube
Source: NASA Ames Research Center
Carbon nanotube based are expected to provide extraordinarily strong but light-weight composites for future structural applications. To realize these applications, we first need to know a lot more about these materials: especially, how strong is this nanotube? How stiff? What happens if you bend it? Twist it? Stretch it? Compress it? This clip shows the simulation of a multiwall nanotube undergoing axial compression.

Forming carbon nanotubes
Source: University of Cambridge
A team of scientists, including researchers at Cambridge University, have successfully produced live video footage that shows how carbon nanotubes, more than 10,000 times smaller in diameter than a human hair, form. The video sequences show nanofibres and nanotubes nucleating around miniscule particles of nickel and are already offering greater insight into how these microscopic structures self-assemble.

Introducing graphene
Source: European Graphene-Flagship initiative
Short film produced by the European Graphene-Flagship initiative, introducing graphene, the 'wonder substance' set to revolutionise the electronics industry.

Nanoseries About Carbon Nanotubes
Source: nano2hybrids
Five short videos about carbon nanotubes sponsored by WomenInNano, nano2hybrids and Vega Science Trust: 1) What is a carbon nanotube? 2) How are carbon nanotubes made? 3) How can we see carbon nanotubes? 4) Where are nanotubes used? 5) Carbon nanoforms.

Nanotube animations
Source: YouTube/mrbarro
An animated travel around and through nanotubes of various materials (carbon, ZnO and CuO) as well as buckyballs.



[First Page] [Prev] Showing page 1 of 2 pages [Next] [Last Page]