Nanotechnology Degree Programs at

 
The goal of the project is to mass produce pressure and temperature sensors which can be cheaply printed onto plastic film and flexibly affixed to a wide range of everyday objects, such as electronic equipment. The 2.2 million euro funded project is coordinated by the Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC.
The DNI coordinates and develops efforts at Drexel University in the broad and interdisciplinary area of nanoscale science and engineering, including research, undergraduate and graduate education, technology transfer, outreach, and dissemination.
The Aachen Graphene & 2D-Materials Center is exploits the unique properties of graphene, two-dimensional (2D)-materials and 2D-heterostructures for different applications in the fields of electronics, sensors and photonics.
The vision of CDNA is exploring fundamental aspects of DNA as a programmable tool for directing the assembly of molecules and materials into nanoarchitectures and functional structures.
iNANO commands a variety of facilities for the synthesis of nanostructured/nanopatterned 0D (i.e. nanoparticle), 1D, 2D and 3D materials. These include: equipment for electrospinning, photo- and electron beam-lithography, nanoparticle synthesis (supercritical synthesis), solid-phase peptide synthesis, DNA modification, bioreactors for large-scale protein expression, isotope labelling, and procedures for synthesis of functionalized nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and bioimaging, aptamers, etc.
The research focus of the laboratory is to develop novel therapeutic nanomaterials with an emphasis toward clinical translation. We seek to adopt an engineering approach to improve treatments for major diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and infectious disease.
Purpose of the program is to establish a national nanotechnology industry in Taiwan.
Acreo, a contract R&D lab, deals with several aspects of optical components and systems for various applications. The company develops and manufactures new components or materials with new properties based on semiconductor structures in the nanometer scale. Examples are new types of light sources, detectors or modulators.
ACTION-Grid is a Specific International Cooperation Project on healthcare information systems based on Grid capabilities and Biomedical Informatics (BMI) and nanoinformatics between Latin America, the Western Balkans and the European Union (EU).
The main goal of NBMC activity is to stimulate an interdisciplinary research and provide trainings on both master and doctoral level in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology.
The main purpose of the Advanced Materials and Nanomaterials Spanish Technological Platform (MATERPLAT) is fostering and promoting innovation in the Advanced Materials and Nanomaterials R&D&I Spanish System, by building a framework of encounter and collaboration between the different agents of the Company, Science and Technology Spanish System.
Theoretical and experimental research of new materials, mainly focused to nanostructures.
Nine Nanotechnology Competence Centers in Germany have established the consortium AGeNT-D (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Nanotechnologie-Kompetenzzentren in Deutschland). The CCNanos are acting nationwide and are located in various regions of Germany. All together they cover the whole range of nanotechnology's research and application areas.
The cluster will enable internationally competitive technological innovation by relevant research organization and R&D-based corporation, around the core of universities and public research organizations which serve as the base of knowledge creation.
Invests in basic research efforts for the Air Force in relevant scientific areas.
The AFRL ML develops materials, processes, and advanced manufacturing technologies for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, rockets, and ground-based systems and their structural, electronic and optical components.
The CNT-Application Research Center supports to resolve a wide range of issues that companies face. The Center aims to accelerate the practical application of carbon nanotubes and contribute to the creation of carbon nanotube industry originate in Japan.
The Alliance for NanoHealth (ANH) was the first multi-disciplinary, multi-institutional collaborative research endeavor aimed solely at using nanotechnology to bridge the gaps between medicine, biology, materials science, computer technology and public policy. The ANH comprises seven world-class research institutions, scientists and clinicians located within the world's largest collection of healthcare facilities.
AMBIO (Advanced Nanostructured Surfaces for the Control of Biofouling) is an Integrated Project funded by the European Commission under its Sixth Framework Programme. The project is at the crossroads between nanosciences and marine biology, environment and high technology and is devoted to the knowledge-based development of antifouling coatings that function through their nanoscale physico-chemical properties, without the release of biocides which may damage the environment.
The Society's Committee on Chemical safety provides guidelines and references for handling nanomaterials.
The American National Standards Institute's Nanotechnology Standards Panel serves as the cross-sector coordinating body for the purposes of facilitating the development of standards in the area of nanotechnology including, but not limited to, nomenclature/terminology; materials properties; and testing, measurement and characterization procedures.
ASNM's activities focus on innovative cutting-edge research in nanomedicine as well as the applications of nanotechnology to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. While promoting seminal research activities in nanomedicine worldwide, issues such as ethics, safety and toxicity, intellectual property, and commercialization will also be addressed and explored.
The American Society for Precision Engineering (ASPE) focuses on many areas that are important in the research, design, development, manufacture and measurement of high accuracy components and systems such as precision controls, metrology, interferometry, materials, materials processing, nanotechnology, optical fabrication, precision optics, precision replication, scanning microscopes, semiconductor processing, standards and ultra-precision machining.
The institute has started a M.Tech Course in Nanotechnology in November, 2003. The program comprises of conceptual knowledge of nanoscience and nanotechnology, including preparation of nanomaterials, their characterization and applications.
The Amrita Nano Biomedical Engineering Centre, or ANBEC, has been established to conduct research and development work on devices and components at the interface between biology, medicine and engineering, where nanoscience and technology can provide a significant value added benefit over existing technologies.
The team at Nano Solar @Amrita is actively pursuing low-cost nanotechnology-based options for both power generation and electrical energy storage. The research is funded by the Department of Science and technology and by the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE). MNRE has funded a Centre for Excellence in Energy Generation and Storage Using Nanomaterials at Amrita. The Centre is pursuing international collaborative initiatives with Switzerland and Korea and is looking to partner with other international groups with a commitment to low cost nano solar options
The CNM's mission includes supporting basic research and the development of advanced instrumentation that will help generate new scientific insights and create new materials with novel properties.
The laboratory has an experience of over fifteen years in thin films & coatings technology, fabrication of nanostructured materials, developing/deploying in-situ & real-time monitoring techniques and in Nanometrology. LTFN programs strive to interact with industry and to transfer its technology to industrial users and developers and provide excellently educated graduates and research associates to society.
Interdepartmental-interscientific postgraduate course
The Arizona Nanotechnology Cluster, an Arizona not-for-profit organization, was formed in January 2003 to share technological advances, and to promote business development in the fast-growing field of nanotechnology.
The Biodesign Institute at ASU addresses today?s critical global challenges in healthcare, sustainability and security by developing solutions inspired from natural systems and translating those solutions into commercially viable products and clinical practices.
The primary aim of the Center for Bioelectronics and Biosensors is to create powerful bioassays for point-of-care diagnostics and a variety of advanced handheld, environmental field microanalyzers. By interfacing three advanced technologies - nanomaterials, biomaterials and electronic transducers - the researchers have the ability to create enhanced biosensors and nanobioelectronics.
Designed as a boundary organization at the interface of science and society, CNS-ASU provides an operational model for a new way to organize research through improved reflexiveness and social learning which can signal emerging problems, enable anticipatory governance, and, through improved contextual awareness, guide trajectories of NSE knowledge and innovation toward socially desirable outcomes, and away from undesirable ones.
Professor Kaushal Rege's group is active in various fields of nanobiotechnoloy.
The main research interest of Prof. Ning's group is the study and development of nano-scale electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices. The research activities are focused on theory, modelling, simulation (TMS), semiconductor nanowires, and semiconductor nanophotonics.
Professor Nongjian Tao's group aims to discover fundamental properties of single molecules and nanostructured materials, invent new electronic and chem- and bio-sensor devices, and develop real-world applications.
ASU's NanoFab is a flexible foundry, offering state-of-the-art device processing and characterization tools to individuals and companies who need occasional or recurring access to such facilities.
The research facility of the US Army.
The Asia Nano Forum (ANF) is a network organization to promote excellence in research, development and the economic uptake of nanotechnology within the Asian region.
The aim of the proposed Japanese-German Research Unit 'Advanced spintronic materials and transport phenomena' (ASPIMATT) is to develop the foundations for a future spintronics with the potential to complement and succeed conventional CMOS. The specific approach lies on the development and characterization of new spintronic materials for applications at room temperature and on the study of new spin transport phenomena, in particular lateral spin current phenomena.
This ASTM (originally known as the American Society for Testing and Materials) Committee addresses issues related to standards and guidance materials for nanotechnology & nanomaterials, as well as the coordination of existing ASTM standardization related to nanotechnology needs.
The Australian Centre for NanoMedicine combines Medicine, Science and Engineering to deliver therapeutic solutions to research problems in medicine. Through a commitment to research, education, knowledge transfer and commercialisation, ACN is dedicated to the prevention, diagnostics and curing of diseases.
The Centre for Quantum Computer Technology is an Australian multi-university collaboration undertaking research on the fundamental physics and technology of building, at the atomic level, a solid state quantum computer in silicon together with other high potential implementations.
The Australian Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology (AINST) is the University of Sydney's latest step in the creation of flexible, interdisciplinary institutes that are devoted to bringing the best people and infrastructure together in the support of frontier research.
The AMMRF is a national grid of equipment, instrumentation and expertise in microscopy, microanalysis, electron and x-ray diffraction and spectroscopy providing nanostructural characterisation capability and services to all areas of nanotechnology and biotechnology research.
Established under the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy, the ANFF links 8 university-based nodes to provide researchers and industry with access to state-of-the-art fabrication facilities. The capability provided by ANFF enables users to process hard materials (metals, composites and ceramics) and soft materials (polymers and polymer-biological moieties) and transform these into structures that have application in sensors, medical devices, nanophotonics and nanoelectronics.
The department carries out a significant research body in nanotechnology and nanosciences.
Extensive research into the design, growth and fabrication of semiconductor and optical devices on the nanometer scale using techniques ranging from MOCVD growth to ion beam processing. Such devices by virtue of their scale, exploit quantum effects to enhance their performance. A large part of this research program focuses on quantum well lasers and detectors of importance to the telecommunications industry. They also research the nanoscale modification of bulk materials such as nanocrystals within semiconductors induced by ion irradiation.
At the Australian National University (ANU), carbon nanotubes, Boron Nitride (BN) nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanowires and other nanomaterials have been produced by using a high-energy ball milling and annealing method, which was developed by the group in 1998.
The Australian Research Council (ARC) Center of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics crosses the boundaries of biology, lasers and nanoscience, using light-based sensors to probe molecular processes within living systems.
Dedicated to substantially enhancing Australia's research outcomes in this important field by promoting effective collaborations, exposing researchers to alternative and complementary approaches from other fields, encouraging forums for postgraduate students and early career researchers, increasing nanotechnology infrastructure, enhancing awareness of existing infrastructure, and promoting international links.
Primary goal of the center is to transfer the technology of validated theory and computational tools from the academic-based Center to the practitioners' development environment which is nanotechnology-based industry.
BICAMN includes focus areas in 'Nanodevices' and in 'Nanomaterials' that explore the basic science of nanoscale magnetism and optics and the structural details of novel nanoparticles and nanoscale thin films.
The mission of the Institute is to play a dominant role in the materials science and technology innovation chain, first of all in the field of laser technology, metal technology and simulation, polymer technology and nanotechnology.
BCMaterials is an autonomous research center that covers all aspects of research in Functional Materials with advanced Electric, Magnetic and Optical properties; from basic aspects to applications. Special activity is devoted to thin films materials and characterization techniques involving Large International Facilities, like neutron and synchrotron radiation sources.
Inspired by the natural biological materials, such as the spider silk, lotus root silk, shells, Professor Cheng's group is focused on bioinspired polymer nanocomposites, including assembly, design and physical properties investigation. Different nanomaterials, such as montmorillonite, carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide, are utilized as building blocks for constructing polymer nanocomposites.
The institute conducts research in the areas of piezoelectronics, photonics and nanopiezoelectric generators and other related areas of basic and applied basic research.
The research directions of BNLMS include: (1) structure and transformation of matter; (2) materials chemistry; (3) nanoscience and nanotechnology; (4) polymer science and engineering; (5) chemistry in life science; (6) environmental and energy chemistry.
The center is doing research in the areas of quantum computing, scanning probe nanotechnology, silicon-based optoelectronics, silicon quantum well devices, silicon and germanium structures.
The institute deals with nanotechnologies and photonic crystal research.
The scientific community grouped under the Ilse Katz Center aims to develop excellent, innovative fundamental research in the field of nano-scaled materials, that will lead to the opening of new technological horizons.
The group focuses on the development of a new classes of nanomaterials for optical, electrical and energy related applications.
The Molecular Foundry at Berkeley Lab is a user facility for the design, synthesis and characterization of nanoscale materials.
Berkeley is transitioning the Berkeley Microlab into the Marvell Nanolab.
Nanoscale mineral particles -- nanoparticles -- are naturally formed and removed from the environment by numerous chemical and biological processes. The Center's mission is to uncover the numerous roles played by nanoparticles in geochemical and biogeochemical processes.
The Berkeley Nanosciences and Nanoengineering Institute (BNNI) is the umbrella organization for expanding and coordinating Berkeley research and educational activities in nanoscale science and engineering.
BSAC is the National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for Microsensors and Microactuators, conducting industry-relevant, interdisciplinary research on micro- and nano-scale sensors, moving mechanical elements, microfluidics, materials, and processes that take advantage of progress made in integrated-circuit, bio, and polymer technologies.
BINAS combines the activities of the University of Bielefeld in nanosciences and biophysics.
UNAM-Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology has emerged from a project of Bilkent University aiming at establishing a national nanotechnology research center in Turkey. Research facilities are expanding rapidly in order to host 100 professional researchers with Ph.D. degrees and at least 300 graduate students. UNAM is growing as a center of excellence in nanotechnology and is operating as a high level national research facility that serves to all interested researchers and users from universities, state enterprises and private sector all over Turkey.
Nanotechnology Research Center at Bilkent University is dedicated to research on theoretical and experimental nanoscience and nanotechnology with strong emphasis on education and training.
The vision of BIODOT is a hybrid bio-organic technology for transduction of dynamical phenomena of biosystems in-vitro. The device that will be developed is based on organic ultra thin film transistors integrated with microfluidics.
BioNanoNet Forschungsgesellschaft mbH (BioNanoNet) is an Austrian scientific network that specializes in the Key Enabling Technologies nanotechnology and biotechnology on a national and international basis, with the emphasis on (1) nanotoxicology, (2) sensortechnologies, as well as (3) health, safety, (nano-)medicine and additionally supports projects in coordination, management, dissemination and communication. BioNanoNet is a European key player in the field of nanosafety, specialised in developing nano-safety-by-design strategies together with researchers and industry.
BBSRC is the UK's leading funding agency for academic research and training in the non-clinical life sciences. It supports several Interdisciplinary Research Collaborations (IRC) in nanotechnology.
The BIOTEX project aims at developing dedicated biochemical-sensing techniques compatible with integration into textile. The consortium includes two research institutes in the field of micro and nanotechnology.
The mission of the group is to provide a rewarding and nourishing atmosphere of hands-on cutting edge research for students to develop and grow professionally and technically and use as an opportunity to springboard to a professional career that will benefit them and society.
The central theme of the group's research is the exploration of quantum mechanical effects in engineered nanoscale structures and devices with a goal to study fundamental physical phenomena.
Research focuses on mechanical and electronic systems at the nanometer length scale. The group has state-of-the-art facilities where nanodevices can be fabricated and characterized.
The Nanoscale Energy-Fluids Transport (NEFT) laboratory experimentally studies energy and fluids transport at the nanoscale. Current investigations include: Exploring anomalous transport phenomenon in 1-D or 2-D confined nanochannels; Enhancing ion/molecule transport in batteries and fuel cells using nanostructured materials; Improving phase-change heat transfer based on patterned micro/nanostructures; Developing new nanofluidic devices for biomolecule sensing and separation.
The Center serves as a hub for nanoscience researchers from the Charles River and Medical Campuses and build activities that develop interdisciplinary research and training.
Research in Optical Characterization and Nanophotonics (OCN) laboratory focuses on developing and applying advanced optical characterization techniques to the study of solid-state and biological phenomena at the nanoscale.
Highly interdisciplinary and translational, the group's research is focused on multifunctional, nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems. They seek to improve nanoparticle synthesis and formulation and its therapeutic efficacy. Additionally, they develop robust engineering processes to accelerate translation of nanoparticle-based drugs into the drug development pipeline. At the same time, they emphasize a fundamental understanding of the interface between nanomaterials and biological systems.
The group's focus is focus on nanoscale science, with an emphasis on carbon nanotubes and their respective uses.
With the global benefits of the new science of nanomedicine growing each year, the British Society for Nanomedicine has been created to allow open access for industry, academia, clinicians and the public to news and details of ongoing research throughout the UK.
The Brookhaven National Laboratory Center for Functional Nanomaterials will provide researchers with state-of-the-art capabilities to fabricate and study nanoscale materials.
The lab of Prof. Kenneth Breuer is active in research covering a wide variety of topics, including: Micron and nanometer scale fluid mechanics; Animal motion, in particular, bat flight and bacterial motility; Turbulent shear flows and shear flow control; Diagnostic methods for fluid mechanics.
The Institute for Molecular and Nanoscale Innovation (IMNI) was founded at Brown University in 2007 as an umbrella organization to support centers and collaborative research teams in targeted areas of the molecular and nanosciences. IMNI is a polydisciplinary venture with 55 faculty participants representing nine departments across campus. IMNI serves as a focal point for interaction with industry, government, and our affiliated hospitals.
Among other areas research into micro- and nanofabrication and nanoscience.
The R. Hurt laboratory at Brown focuses on the creation of 3D nanomaterial architectures and new nano-enabled technologies. They also study the potential adverse effects of emerging 2D nanomaterials on human health and the environment and work to identify safe design rules rooted in fundamental materials chemistry and physics that will enable their successful development and commercialization.
Research and education carried out in this laboratory are associated with the experimental, computational and conceptual study of nanomechnics and micromechanics of materials
The research group of Prof. Shouheng Sun is interested in nanoscale materials synthesis, self-assembly and applications in biomagnetics, catalysis, information storage and magnetic nanocomposites
Prof. Webster directs the Nanomedicine Laboratory which designs, synthesizes, and evaluates nanomaterials for various implant applications. Nanomaterials are central to the field of nanotechnology and are materials with one dimension less than 100 nm. Tissues investigated include bone, bladder, vascular, cartilage, dental, and the nervous system.
Major research centre with multidisciplinary approach including materials, nanobio, electronics, microrobotics.
The California Institute of Nanotechnology's mission is to conduct research and development and provide professional education and training in the frontier of nanotechnology to meet the needs of the emerging industry for the benefit of the society. The institute conducts advanced and applied research in nanotechnology to help solve major problems facing mankind such as diseases, shortage of energy and global environmental issues.
The Atwater research group at Caltech is engaged in interdisciplinary materials and device research, spanning photonics and electronics and with applications in Si-based photonics, plasmonics, renewable energy and mechanically active thin film devices.
Research covers nanobiotechnology, nanophotonics and large-scale integration of nanosystems.
The objectives of the MSC are to develop methods required for first principles multiscale multi-paradigm based predictions of the structures and properties of proteins, DNA, polymers, ceramics, metal alloys, semiconductors, organometallics and to apply these methods to design new materials for pharma, catalysis, microelectronics, nanotechnology, and superconductors.
In the Molecular Programming Project (MPP) at the California Institute of Technology and the University of Washington, scientists will develop new computer science principles for programming information-bearing molecules like DNA and RNA to create artificial biomolecular programs of similar complexity.
The group is primarily interested in the design, fabrication and characterization nano-scale photonic and fluidic devices and systems.
Motivated by the goal of encoding arbitrary mechanical function into nucleic acid sequences, the lab is working to develop computational algorithms for the analysis and design of equilibrium and kinetic properties of nucleic acid systems. In the laboratory, we are focused on constructing molecular sensors, transducers and motors for therapeutic, bioimaging, and transport applications.
The research activities of Michael Roukes' group at Caltech are currently focused upon developing and using of nanodevices in the exploration of single-quantum and single-molecule phenomena.
One of the research areas at the Vahala group at Caltech is Planar Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Lasers.
The University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, Santa Barbara have joined to build the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI), which will facilitate a multidisciplinary approach to develop the information, biomedical, and manufacturing technologies that will dominate science and the economy in the 21st century
The aim of the Centre is to provide a contral focus for nanoscience research in Cambridge, housing both a wide range of research equipment and office accomodation for researchers working on interdisciplinary nanotechnology projects.
This consortium is sponsored by European Community under Framework Program 6. It gathers 15 research and industrial partners to improve the fundamental knowledge of carbon nanotubes as well as their applications.
A non-profit research organization that brings together the various elements, across international boundaries, which are required for successfully transitioning exciting micro-nano technologies into aerospace systems.
In this project, the team plans to take advantage of the extraordinary electronic and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes. We plan to extend the operation of HEMT/FET-type nanotube devices to the quantum limit, and to demonstrate their usefulness in conjunction with a mechanical nanotube resonator serving as a force sensor at sub-attoNewton resolution.
The mission of the Center is to work on real-world problems that can potentially be solved with appropriate nano-enabled technologies.
The Center for Silicon System Implementation (CSSI) is focused on all aspects of integrated system design and manufacturing that spans from network-on-achip architectures to self-adaptable analog and digital circuits, to ultra low-power nano devices, bio chips, and the CAD methodologies that enable them.
Facilities for thin film and nano/micro device development.
Research activities cover micro robotics, micro/nano manipulation and bio-inspired systems.
Carolina Institute for NanoMedicine (CINM) was established in 2010 as an umbrella program to support multidisciplinary nanotechnology research among investigators from variety of backgrounds including College of Arts & Sciences, UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, and UNC School of Medicine. The goal of CINM is to improve human health by enhancing the scientific knowledge as well as the transition of basic research discoveries into clinical trials. CINM harbors two centers: The Carolina Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (C-CCNE) and The Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery (CNDD)
The lab's research is focused on: Nanomedicine, Quantum dots, Biosensor, Textile, Controllable synthesis, Electronic paper.
The center's mission is to pursue an integrated science and engineering program by utilizing emerging carbon nanotechnology to develop new materials, devices and systems. One of their unique strengths is applying advanced synthetic methods to the development of advanced carbon nanomaterials with well-defined, multidimensional structures for multifunctional applications, including electrochemical energy conversion and storage.
The Center creates an integrated program of research an deducation through the vehicle of a unique microlayering and nanolayering process technology at Case Western Reserve University.
The Feng Research Group is working to explore fundamental physics and new engineering of nanoscale solid-state structures and devices. Their research efforts are primarily focused upon emerging nanoscale devices that have strong potential for enabling building blocks and components for novel circuits and transducers, which could lead to future generations of devices and integrated systems for advanced sensing, computing, and communication applications.
The Casimir Research School is a graduate school for interdisciplinary physics with a strong emphasis on the various nanosciences.
The recent EUREKA programme CATRENE (Cluster for Application and Technology Research in Europe on NanoElectronics) will effect Technological Leadership for a competitive European ICT industry. It is the ambition of Europe and the European companies to deliver nano-/microelectronics solutions that respond to the needs of society at large, improving the economic prosperity of Europe and reinforcing the ability of its industry to be at the forefront of the global competition. CATRENE builds on the successful previous EUREKA programmes JESSI, MEDEA, and MEDEA+ in fostering the continued development of a dynamic European ecosystem with the critical mass necessary to compete at a global level in high technology industries.
The SiNaPS laboratory is committed to basic research on the optical and physical properties of low-dimensional semiconductor structures and their applications to nano optics and nano electronics.
(Website in French) One of the largest applied research laboratories in Micro and Nanotechnologies in Europe, it focuses on microelectronics and microsystems on silicon, systems for biology and health, and optoelectronic and components.
CellNanoTox, 'Cellular Interaction and Toxicology with Engineered Nanoparticles', is a Specific Targeted Research Project funded by the European Commission under the Sixth Framework Program. The project addresses the needs of the European society for assessing the risk of occupational and general population exposure to industrially manufactured nanoparticles. It is expected to generate new knowledge on potential health risk or the absence of it, providing objective arguments for recommendations and regulations.
CellPROM - beginning March 2004 - is the largest Integrated Project within the NMP priority of the 6th Framework Programme of the European Commission. CellPROM unites 27 academic and industrial researchers from 12 countries for a period of four years to achieve its main objective of non-invasive 'reprogramming' of individual cells on an industrial scale.
The purpose of CEMES is to manufacture, understand, model and manipulate matter at the atomic scale. In CEMES, physicists and chemists invent (nano) materials and molecules of desired properties and integrate them into demonstrating devices. CEMES mostly aims at: establishing the link between the atomic structure/composition and the physical properties of (nano)materials; designing, synthesizing and studying the first prototypes of molecular nano-machines; and inventing and/or developing new instruments and techniques able to study these 'objects' at the pertinent scales (space and time).
Can one establish a communication with a single molecule and get it to compute? How to guide light energy on a surface down to a single fluorescing molecule and trigger its emission? These two questions share the challenge to build new integrated architectures able to funnel electrons and photons through waveguides that shrink by a factor 1000 between the macroscopic and the single molecule worlds. The COMOSYEL project and team led by Erik DUJARDIN in CEMES and funded by the European Reseach Council (ERC) aim at tackling these fascinating concepts through several experimental approaches.
CeNTech was created as one of Germany's first centers for nanotechnology. Integrated into the densest network of universities in all over Europe in the German state of North Rhine-Westfalia (NRW), CeNTech provides the ideal environment to direct selected ideas and results of nanotechnological research into technical applications.
CINT is a Department of Energy/Office of Science Nanoscale Science Research Center (NSRC) operating as a national user facility devoted to establishing the scientific principles that govern the design, performance, and integration of nanoscale materials.
CeNIDE is based on the strongly interdisciplinary research excellence in the area of Nanotechnology at the University Duisburg-Essen. This includes an exceptionally broad knowledge base in fundamental nanoscience, unique fabrication facilities for nanoscale materials in large quantities, and experience in questions of scalability and reliability.
The Center consists of a Research Program and the Nanofab, a shared-use facility providing economical access to state-of-the-art nanofabrication and nano-measurement tools.
The mission of CeNS is to promote, coordinate, and bundle interdisciplinary research in the field of nanoscience. CeNS consolidates research activities at the nanometer scale from the areas of physics, biophysics, chemistry, biochemistry, and medicine. The network promotes the mutual understanding and collaboration between researchers from these different disciplines by joint seminars, workshops, and schools which are organized by CeNS.
The Centro de Nanociencia y Nanotecnologia (CEDENNA) is one of the leading center sfor Nanoscience and Nanotechnology in Chile.
The Center of Excellence in Nanosciences and Nanotechnology (CENN Nanocenter) is the response of Slovenian researchers and industry to meet the challenges of new technology. The CENN Nanocenter encompasses top-level facilities that enable researchers to achieve significant results.
A high-competence materials engineering cluster and R&D service provider.
Centexbel is a Belgian textile research centre that offers activities around Research & Development and Services (testing included) throughout its regional offices. It's nanotechnology activities focuss on nanoscale modifications of textile surfaces by means of atmospheric plasma treatment; nano coatings; and the incorporation of nano additives in fibres and coatings; and electro-spinning for the production of nano fibres
The research in the Biological Materials Laboratory of CSIR-CLRI focuses on exploitation of biological materials in synthesis of novel nanomaterial and their utilization for a range of application; from waste water management to biomedical science. The lab pursues a broad range of research interests that include biomimetics and bioinspired nanomaterial synthesis, understanding the fundamental mechanism of bioinspired nanomaterial synthesis, design of multi functional nanomaterials, utilization of bio and nanomaterials in pollution control management, and application of nanomaterials in catalysis, biosensing and biomedicine.
The Centre de Compétences Nanosciences Nord Ouest (C’nano Nord Ouest) gathers laboratories from Nord-Pas de Calais, Picardie, Basse-Normandie, Haute-Normandie, Bretagne, Pays de la Loire and Poitou-Charentes regions.
The ongoing research programmes at the CCMB are in three major categories - high quality basic research in the frontier areas of modern biology, research relevant to societal needs, and application-oriented research towards commercialisation.
The Centre de Nanosciences et de Nanotechnologies is a joint research unit between the CNRS and Université Paris-Sud-Université Paris-Saclay. The center is active in the fields of material science, nanophotonics, nanoelectronics, nanobiotechnologies and microsystems, as well as in nanotechnologies.
The specific thematic objectives of the Centre are enhancement of the research potential in the field of advanced structural and functional materials and development of highly specialized techniques of investigation to obtain information on properties of materials and their behavior in service conditions.
CSEM's expertise in nanotechnology focuses on characterization, optics, microscopy, and surface engineering. The combination of these technologies with other ones such as microfluidics, microsystems, photonic optics and micro-optics makes CSEM able to integrate successfully nanotechnology to novel products.
(Spanish language site) The nanotechnology lab at the country's Center for High Technology.
The CNM-IMB has established a new R&D activity focussed on the integration of microelectronics with nanotechnology, which includes nanolithography, combination of nanodevices with CMOS circuits and development of nanoelectromechanical systems.
The Graphene Centre at Chalmers gathers all of our research, education and innovation related to graphene under one common umbrella. Synergies between our multiple graphene projects can be identified, utilised and developed, at same time we create an environment that attracts researchers, students and cooperation partners. The centre is the obvious entry point to the Swedish network of graphene research and development, as well as to the EU?s research initiative on graphene - the Graphene Flagship.
The Linneqs environment is lead by a coordinator, Per Delsing, together with four project coordinators for the four different research areas, Vitaly Shumeiko (Qubits), Dag Winkler (Quantum Transport), Sergey Kubatkin (Graphene) and Eva Olsson (Enabling Technologies).
The research focuses on carbon based device fabrication, characterization, interconnect and packaging for electronics, microsystem and biomedicine.
Large efforts, experimental as well as theoretical, are directed at materials, devices and subsystems for future micro/nanoelectronics in the fields of microwave electronics, quantum devices, photonics, micro- and nanosystems, superconducting devices and circuits and molecular electronics just to mention a few.
The Nanofabrication Laboratory is a world-class university cleanroom for research into and fabrication of micro and nano technology. The laboratory is run by the department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience at Chalmers, but is an open user facility for external as well as internal academic and industrial interests.
Charged Particle Nanotech is an Integrated Project in the European Sixth Framework Programme (FP6), research priority NMP ('Nanotechnologies and Nanosciences, knowledge-based Multifunctional Materials, and new Production Processes and Devices'). CHARPAN is driven by industrial needs for new efficient production technologies for the fabrication of complex 2D and 3D surface structures necessary in numerous nanotechnology devices such as templates for nanoimprint applications.
Applied materials research in processes, hydrocarbons, polymers, energy, nanoparticles, environment, catalysts.
The institute is active in the fields of advanced technologies for microelectronics, microsystems and silicon micromachining as well as nanotechnologies.
The center has been established at the institute of physics of the Chemnitz University of technology to concentrate and coordinate the activities of several research groups in the field of design and analytics of materials, especially organic/inorganic hybrid materials on the nanometer scale.
A Marie Research Training Network which apporoaches the general goal of probing, understanding and using chiral molecular and supramolecular interactions at the nanoscale.
The Ingber laboratory is interested in the general mechanism of cell and developmental regulation. The lab also has shown that extracellular matrix and cell shape distortion play central roles in control of angiogenesis that is required for tumor growth and expansion, and has developed numerous novel microtechnologies, nanotechnologies, magnetic control systems and computational models in the course of pursuing these studies.
This research group focuses on the basis theory and applications of molecular electronics, nano- and micro- ordered thin film, and bionics thin film; on the research of the novel apparatus such as photoelectronic device and biosensor; and on the applications of nanomaterial system in controlled drug release.
The research of NPDL focuses on nanoscale physics and nanoscale devices.
CIC biomaGUNE (Centro de Investigacion Cooperativa en Biomateriales - Bioscience Cooperative Research Centre) is a non-profit association with the basic aim of creating, producing, promoting and applying scientific and technological knowledge in the biomaterials field by carrying out systematic research and experimental development work. One of the research programs puts particular emphasis on the properties and applications of molecular-level biological nanostructures.
NanoGUNE is a research center with the mission of performing world-class nanoscience research for the competitive growth of the Basque Country.
The Nanotechnology Unit at CIDETEC develops nanomaterials as well as new technologies such as nanophotonics and organic nanoelectronics, and organic photovoltaic technology.
The Research Center on Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology (CINN) is a joint research center created in 2007 by institutional joint initiative between the Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), the Government of Asturias and the University of Oviedo. The CINN combines interdisciplinary research strongly competitive at international level with scientific and technological demonstration activities towards enterprises technologically advanced, and has among its main objectives the creation of new technology-based firms.
The EU FP6 project Circles of Light is expected to increase the European competitiveness in Nanophotonics by providing new solutions to overcome technological gaps and to make silicon a leading material base also in photonics.
A non-profit organization, CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik und Photovoltaik GmbH is an industry-oriented research institution focused on microsensors, microsystem technology and photovoltaics.
COSDAF woks in the areas of nanomaterials & nanotechnology, organic light-emitting devices (OLED), nanodiamond and superhard thin films
Research in Vinod Menon's group can best be summarized as the exploration of light-matter interactions at the nano and micro scale.
The group's research interests span over a broad range of technical areas, including applied electromagnetics, nano-optics and nanophotonics, microwave, THz, infrared, optical and acoustic metamaterials and metasurfaces, plasmonics, nonlinearities and nonreciprocity, cloaking and scattering, acoustics, optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas.
CAMP's mission is to perform innovative research and conduct educational efforts on the synthesis and processing of advanced materials of interest to industry.
The research interests of nano-bio lab lie at the interface of physics, biology, and nanoscience. This lab aims to seamlessly integrate the principles of condensed matter physics, optical spectroscopy, and physiological chemistry to elucidate biophysics at the nanoscale.
The Institute specializes in studying the properties and applications of nanomaterials. Their work combines science and engineering to improve energy storage and energy generation devices, as well as studying fundamental aspects of nanoscale systems.
The Nanoscale Electronics and Sensor Laboratory (NESL) is currently focused on five major research areas: Epitaxial Graphene based Sensors; MEMS sensors; Nanowire based MEMS sensors and electronics; Implantable sensors for biomedical application; Scanning probe characterization.
The initiative's expertise is to connect nanotechnology competences from different sectors, in particular science, politics and education. With a focus on small and medium-sized companies they primarily support networking among SMEs, but also include universities, colleges and research institutes. They support the efficient transfer of R&D&I results into marketable products and promote cooperation activities between the different stakeholders.
The Cluster of Excellence Engineering of Advanced Materials ? Hierarchical Structure Formation for Functional Devices (EAM) is the only interdisciplinary research collaboration of its type in Germany to focus on materials science and process technology. Its research centers on the fundamental and applied aspects of designing and creating novel high-performance materials.
CMC Microsystems provides microsystems researchers with industry-calibre design resources, access to state-of-the-art prototyping technologies, tools for test and support services to accelerate Canadian competitiveness through nano- and microelectronics.
Research at S3 is structured along the following lines: Nanobiosystems; Nanomagnetism: Control of magnetization dynamics in nanomagnets; Nanofabrication and surface/interface phenomena at the nanoscale; Theory and simulations of nanostructured materials.
Co-Pilot aims to assist business in the execution of pilot production of nanomaterials. Co-Pilot is developing an open access infrastructure for companies interested in the production of high quality (multi-)functional nano-composites on a pilot scale.
Research into interfaces, surfaces, and thin films is one of the most active areas of research.
The research of the Brus group is in the physical chemistry of materials, interfaces, nanocrystals, and nanotubes, especially in relation to optical and electronic properties.
The CNI Shared Facilities are open to student and faculty researchers, as well as those from government, start-ups, and industry. The Clean Room offers a comprehensive set of tools for microfabrication and nanofabrication. The Materials Characterization Laboratory and the Electron Microscopy Laboratory offer state-of-the-art instruments for chemical and structural characterization of materials.
Main research interests include Raman Scattering and other Optical Spectroscopy of Nanocrystals and Electric-field Assisted Assembly of Nanomaterial Films.
The Center aims to advance understanding of cellular mechanical biology in order to develop technologies for regenerative medicine and advance immunotherapy.
Responsible for developing Australia's National Nanotechnology Strategy. Houses a National Research Flagship for Niche Manufacturing that includes nanomanufacturing.
(Site in German) The Center of Competence in Nano-Scale Analysis is a nationwide network created to link core competences in the fields of particle and surface analysis in order to develop improved mechanisms for transferring basic research into products, manufacturing processes and services.
The CRNCPM links several research groups engaged in the research of nanostructured and crosslinked polymeric materials in the Czech Republic.
The goal of the European CONTACT project is to establish a tailored supply chain of new CNT-filled composites with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties for applications including electrodes, structural materials and windblades.
An n independent, national platform pooling the scientific and regulatory knowledge and expertise available in Switzerland on the safe handling of synthetic nanomaterials - from production to use and disposal - and conveying it efficiently and in a generally understandable form to companies (start-ups, SMEs, and established firms).
Subjects of research encompass physical sciences, life sciences, and engineering, particularly with inter-disciplinary emphasis
The Craighead research group at Cornell focuses on creating nanoscale devices using established and newly-developed techniques. A major motivation is to develop methods to pattern, sort, and analyze biological materials.
KIC creates new techniques to image and dynamically control nanoscale systems and uses these techniques to push the frontiers of nanoscale science. KIC's measurement-oriented mission complements existing strengths at Cornell in nanofabrication.
The McEuen Group runs the Laboratory of Atomic and Solid State Physics at Cornell. Reaerch focus is on proberties of carbon nanotubes, SPM of nanostructures, single molecule electronics and applications of nanoelectronics in chemistry and biology
The Muller group is the research group of Prof. David A. Muller, a faculty member of the Applied and Engineering Physics department of Cornell University. The group's research typically centres around the investigation of the underlying physics of functional nanostructures, primarily by the application of advanced microscopic and spectroscopic techniques.
This research group aims at understanding complex phenomena at the nanoscale that are of fundamental relevance to fiber and polymer science.
CORONA is a European project of nine partners all along the value chain in micro and nanotechnologies (MNT). CORONA attempts to accelerate the businesses of European companies.
CSIR is one of the leading scientific and technology research, development and implementation organisations in Africa. CSIR Materials Science and Manufacturing through its Science Initiatives and Industry Themes investigates and develops nanomaterials and nanostructures.
The university's nanotechnology area of experise home page.
The Surface Engineering and Nanotechnology Institute (SENTi) is a world-leading Centre of excellence for innovative research into atomistic and particulate based manufacturing techniques for the production of protective and active surface coating systems with a mission to transform innovative manufacturing research into engineered products. The Institute is led by Professor John Nicholls.
Ultraprecision Technologies and Nano-engineering is the structuring of materials at the nanoscale; a realm where precision and accuracy often comes down to the ability to manipulate individual atoms.
The VNLab is a team of dedicated computational and theoretical physicists, chemists and materials scientists who investigate a range of fundamental properties of nanostructures under different thermochemical conditions.
The Curtin Institute of Functional Molecules and Interfaces (Formerly the Nanochemistry Research Institute) at Curtin University is comprised of academic staff members, postdoctoral fellows, as well as PhD, Honours and 3rd project students. The research undertaken by the group ranges from government-funded fundamental research to confidential one-on-one industrial projects.
The research undertaken by the group ranges from government-funded fundamental research to confidential one-on-one industrial projects.
The goal of the organization is to better represent, both nationally and internationally, the strengths and capabilities of Czech companies in business, research, and education. CeskoJe Nano seeks to build on the already auspicious foundation that Czech nanotechnology achievements hold today as one of the leading international locations for innovation and strives to create a stronger awareness of these abilities while at the same time forging new links and opening new opportunities for cooperation between commercial and research sectors.
The group is devoted to fundamental research on the catalysis on nanocatalysts and interface chemistry, with the emphasis on the development and employment of appropriate methods and technologies in order to understand the nature of catalysis.
The materials investigated include metals, amorphous and crystalline alloys, semiconductors, oxide, nitride and carbide ceramics in the form of clusters, thin films, multilayers and bulk nanocrystalline materials. All synthesis techniques are based on vapor phase processes such as Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and DC- and RF- Magnetron Sputtering for thin films and multilayers and Chemical Vapor Synthesis (CVS) and Inert Gas Condensation (IGC) for clusters and nanocrystalline materials.
The Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM) is at the forefront of innovation in materials design and engineering research. The key research areas fall under two main themes: innovative manufacturing technologies and energy efficiency; resource and infrastructure sustainability.
The DEEPEN project is Europe?s leading research partnership for integrated understanding of the ethical challenges posed by emerging nanotechnologies in real world circumstances, and their implications for civil society, for governance, and for scientific practice.
DARPA is the central research and development organization for the Department of Defense. It manages and directs selected basic and applied research and development projects for DoD, and pursues research and technology where risk and payoff are both very high and where success may provide dramatic advances for traditional military roles and missions. DARPA manages a number of nanotechnology projects.
The department focuses on the functioning of single cells in all their complexity down to the molecular level. Understanding the mechanisms operating inside a cell is very useful for practical applications in, for example, improved health care, molecularly targeted medicine, and development of new energy sources. The department of Bionanoscience is part of the university's successful Kavli Institute of Nanoscience.
The Else Kooi Laboratory and its staff aim to provide micro fabrication capabilities that facilitate excellence in (sub)micro-fabrication oriented Research & Science, enable customers to test out concepts that may lead to business successes (up to and including small scale production) and build a bridge between Academics and Industrial Innovation.
The department studies quantum phenomena in a wide variety of nanometer scale devices and materials, exploring new physics and novel applications of quantum effects. The department consists of a number of active scientists working on both experimental and theoretical aspects of Quantum Nanoscience.
The Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at Delft University of Technology consists of six research groups and a nanofabrication cleanroom facility.
The project Development of Lithography Technology for Nanoscale Structuring of Materials Using Laser Beam Interference (DELILA) focuses on researching and developing a new production technology for fabrication of 2D and 3D nano structures and devices. In particular, DELILA will enable low cost and large volume production of surface structures and patterns with nanometric resolution.
The "Design for Micro & Nano Manufacture (Patent-DfMM)" Network of Excellence aims to establish a new technical community that will address the underlying engineering science to ensure that problems affecting the manufacture and reliability of products based on MNT can be addressed before prototype and pre-production.
DINAMICS is a European FP6-funded project that aims to promote the uptake of nanotechnological approaches by developing an integrated costeffective nanobiological sensor for detection of bioterrorism and environmental assays. The prime deliverable is an exploitable lab-on-a-chip device for detection of pathogens in water using on-the-spot recognition and detection based on the nanotechnological assembly of unlabelled DNA.
The DIAMANT team has pioneered the discovery and development of diamond as a uniquely promising material system for solid-state molecular technologies: Diamond has exceptional optical and magnetic properties that are associated with dopant complexes - or 'solid-state molecules' - in the diamond lattice. The DIAMANT project will develop new technologies to enable placement of exactly one atom at a time into a selected location in the diamond lattice with nanometre precision.
The European Union's 7th Framework Programme's collaborative research project FP7-2009-IST-4-248613 DIAMOND - Diagnosis, Error Modelling and Correction for Reliable Systems Design aims at improving the productivity and reliability of semiconductor and electronic systems design in Europe by providing a systematic methodology and an integrated environment for the diagnosis and correction of errors.
The objective of the EU project 'Development of diamond intracellular nanoprobes for oncogen transformation dynamics monitoring in living cells' (DINAMO) is to develop the nanodiamond particle (NDP) non-invasive label-free nanotechnology sensing platform for real-time monitoring of 1) biomolecular processes inside (and outside) living cells, as modified by oncogenesis, 2) the kinetics of gene-assisted processes in the cells, in accordance with the Call objectives.
A European project for the devolopment of an integrated platform to assess the risk of nanoparticles.
The Spanier Group at the MesoMaterials Lab at Drexel uses variable temperature scanning probe microscopy to probe selected physical, electronic, mechanical, magnetic and optical properties of nanostructures.
Research in the Nanomaterials Group is focused on the fundamental and applied aspects of synthesis and characterization of carbon nanomaterials (nanotubes, nanodiamond and nanoporous carbons), ceramic nanoparticles (whiskers, nanowires, etc) and composites.
The BioNanoTechnology research at the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems at Drexel University (Drexel BIOMED) is focused on bioinformatics, biosensing, bioimaging, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and neuroengineering, which are the main research thrusts of the school.
The mission of the Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics is to continue to advance the basic understanding of electromagnetic metamaterials, exploring their capabilities and limitations across the electromagnetic spectrum. They want to develop fabrication techniques for metamaterials that may operate in various environments, with a particular emphasis on structures designed for terahertz, telecommunications and optical wavelengths.
The Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology (CEINT) is dedicated to elucidating the relationship between a vast array of nanomaterials ? from natural, to manufactured, to those produced incidentally by human activities - and their potential environmental exposure, biological effects, and ecological consequences. Headquartered at Duke University, CEINT is a collaboration between Duke, Carnegie Mellon University, Howard University, and Virginia Tech and investigators from the University of Kentucky and Stanford University.
Research topics are: Nanotubes and Nanowires; Cryogenic scanning microscopy; Self-assembled DNA templates; Nanocrystal Single-Electron Transistor
The Fitzpatrick Institute for Photonics at Duke University's Pratt School of Engineering aims to help turn North Carolina into a photon forest where research and development in photonics can create the kind of technological advance and economic growth found in California's Silicon Valley.
The Liu Laboratory at Duke University pursues research in the field of nanomaterials, synthesizing and studying materials with size of nanometers.
DYNASYNC, short for 'Dynamics in Nano-scale Materials Studied with Synchrotron Radiation', is a Framework Six project. Seven laboratories from Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Hungary and Poland collaborate in an ambitious specific targeted research project to address size-dependent quantum phenomena on nano-scale both theoretically and experimentally.
The Energy and Environmental Technology Applications Center (E2TAC) addresses the needs of advanced energy and environmental applications by leveraging the intellectual power base and state-of-the-art infrastructure at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) and making use of its extensive capabilities in microelectronics and nanotechnology.
Created in 2003 the NanoMaDe team (NanoMAterials & DEvices) is involved in the field of nanotechnology and nanoscience, particularly on topics related to the carbon nanotubes, graphene and semiconductor nanowires synthesis, as well as their collective organization, deposition on various substrates, in deep characterization and integration into advanced electronic devices (field effect transistors, gas or biological sensors, NEMS, field emission micro-cathodes and other applications).
The group exploits the properties of new nanomaterials; their unusual structural, optical, thermal, and electronic properties for future applications. Research in our group centers around nanowires since these offer an unprecedented level of flexibility and control. The versatility of their material composition allows envisioning new applications in chemistry, physics, engineering science and bioscience.
The group brings together researchers from these two fields and aims at establishing a coherent research program on the physics and chemistry of nanostructured materials and nano-sized organic and inorganic molecular systems.
Current research projects in the areas nanomagnetism, spintronics, and ultra-fast spin dynamics
The Institute joins together electrooptics and nanotechnology faculty from the Universities of Louisville and Kentucky, and affiliated researchers from the Illinois Institute of Technology, China and Russia.
The EMERGNANO project has been commissioned by Defra in the UK to capture and critically appraise the emerging evidence concerning the health and environmental risks of nanomaterials.
The lab investigates mechanical materials properties from the nano to macro-scale using experimental, analytical, and computational techniques. Current cutting edge research within European projects and the ETH competence center on high temperature materials focuses on micro- and nano- mechanical properties of materials (instrumentation, scale effects related to microstructure and physical dimension.
eNanoMapper (ENM) proposes a computational infrastructure for toxicological data management of engineered nanomaterials based on open standards, ontologies and an interoperable design to enable a more effective, integrated approach to European research in nanotechnology.
(website in German) A network of nano and nanobiotech research groups and companies in the Munich region.
The ENPRA project is a major European Framework 7 project to develop and implement a novel integrated approach for engineered nanoparticle (ENP) risk assessment.
AMIC is an innovation center belonging to the Technological Innovation Network created by the Catalan Autonomous Government. AMIC offers key-in-hand solutions for environmental and industrial problems of the manufacturing sectors. AMIC also works on nanomaterials such as Ag, Au, Pt, Cu and Pd nanocubes and other morphologies.
One of the areas of research deals with nanometric positioning.
Professor Forro's group at the Institute of Physics of Complex Matter
The activities of the laboratory aim at a detailed description of photo-induced processes in the molecular condensed phase (liquid, solid and proteins) and in metallic and semiconductor nanostructured materials. A central approach of the group is the visualization in 'real time' of the processes by means of ultrafast laser spectroscopy.
NANOLAB is working on various subjects in the field of silicon micro/nano-electronics with special emphasis on the technology, design and modelling of nanoscale solid-state devices (including Silicon-On-Insulator devices, few-electron devices, hybrid SET/CMOS, single electron memory, nanowires and nanotubes), Radio Frequency MEMS devices for in- and above-IC and integrated optoelectronic devices. The group is interested in exploring new materials, novel fabrication techniques, and novel device concepts for future nanoelectronic systems.
The Nanophotonics & Metrology Laboratory (NAM) at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL) covers a broad spectrum, from nanophotonics to plasmonics, near-field optical microscopy to spectroscopy, from optical signal processing for sensing and telecommunications to speckle and holographic interferometry.
The group is working on nanoelectronics based on new, two-dimensional materials such as graphene and MoS2. These materials represent the ultimate limit of miniaturization in the vertical dimension and offer substantial advantages over nanotubes or nanowires.
The group develops and characterizes novel nanostructured materials for solar energy applications. The nanocomposite coatings consist typically of dielectric, semiconductor or metal nanocrystals embedded in a dielectric matrix. Applications include antireflection coatings on solar collector glazing, colored coatings with high solar transmittance for novel glazing of solar thermal facades, photoluminescent quantum dot solar concentrators for photovoltaic energy conversion, and optical selective absorber coatings for thermal solar collectors and thermoelectric power generation.
The Sensors, Actuators and Microsystems Laboratory was created in 1982 by professor Nico F. de Rooij. Since then, SAMLAB has increased in size and has reached a staff of about 50 persons, including 15 PhD students.
ePIXfab was started as the Silicon Photonics Platform within the framework of ePIXnet, the FP6 Network of Excellence on photonic integrated components and circuits. The mission of ePIXfab is to build a future for silicon photonics in Europe through the development of a fabless model for the fabrication of silicon photonic circuits based on existing CMOS labs and commercial foundries relying on European know-how.
The European FP6 Network of Excellence ePIXnet provides a platform to its academic and industrial partners for sharing and integrating research facilities and research know-how in the field of photonic integrated components and circuits.Research themes: Towards technologies for photonic VLSI; Nanophotonics; Advanced materials; Integrated and integratable light sources; Ultra-wide band photonic signal; processing.
From 2004 to 2010, the Nakamura Functional Carbon Cluster project aimed at creating a wide variety of functional materials based on C60 and carbon nanotubes that are given functionality through organic synthesis.
The Ernst Ruska-Center houses several of the world's most advanced electron microscopes and tools for nanocharacterisation.
A unique community of researchers, sponsors and idealists in Austria, who actively contribute to the propagation of knowledge and technology in the field of nanoscience.
The European Union Observatory for Nanomaterials (EUON) provides information about existing nanomaterials on the EU market. Whether you are developing policies in the area, a consumer or representing industry or a green NGO, the information on the EUON offers interesting reading about the safety, innovation, research and uses of nanomaterials. EUON is hosted and maintained by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA).
The first European Infrastructure for micro and nano fabrication and characterisation using a broad range of materials. EUMINAfab partners offer no-fee access to 36 installations with the necessary technical support personnel in the areas of micro and nano patterning, thin film deposition, replication and characterisation.
The EuroIndiaNet project aims to promote stronger collaboration between EU and Indian scientists and industrialists in the areas of the nanosciences and nanotechnologies.
Based on the success of the EuroNanoMed ERA-NET initiative (2009-2011), support to the European Nanomedecine research community is continuing. The EuroNanoMed II ERA-NET project, comprising 20 partners from 17 countries/regions, has been granted funding through the EC?s 7th Framework Programme. It will run from November 2012 to October 2016.
The integrated project PACE will explore the utilization of the simplest technically feasible elementary living units to build evolvable complex information systems. The Center will create, analyse and investigate the applications of such systems that process information by self-organization starting at molecular scales. They will explore the collective properties of artificial cells and demonstrate that they are the right material for building nanoscale robot ecologies.
The objectives of ANNA are to integrate and enhance European analytical resources and to create a centre of excellence of analysis for nanotechnologies and a multi?site laboratory.
The European Molecular Biology Laboratory is a non-profit organisation and a basic research institute funded by public research monies from 19 member states. Research at EMBL is conducted by approximately 80 independent groups covering the spectrum of molecular biology. Research projects include biomolecular nanomachines and optical nanotechnologies.
ESMI is a non-profit and apolitical society, which promotes the development and practical application of Molecular Imaging within Europe. It fosters co-operation between workers from European countries in the various disciplines in its field.
Euspen is a community of leading industrialists and researchers working in the field of precision, micro and nano engineering with representation across 32 countries worldwide. Euspen's focus is on: Nano-precision manufacturing; Design and build of ultra-precision machine systems; Characterisation: metrology systems, instruments and techniques.
EuMaT has been launched in order to assure optimal involvement of industry and other important stakeholders in the process of establishing of R&D priorities in the area of advanced engineering materials and technologies.
A group of 53 European stakeholders, composed of industrial and academic experts, has established a European Technology Platform on nanomedicine.
The European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility is a User Facility charged with providing support and service to research under way in academic, government and industrial laboratories. All domains that need knowledge about electronic excitations, transport and spectroscopy will benefit from the ETSF, such as condensed matter physics and chemistry, biology, materials and nanoscience. Theoretical Spectroscopy reveals the mechanisms of electronic excitations and can predict new materials properties. This combination of quantum mechanics theory and numerical calculations constitutes an approach that is complementary to experiment.
Here you can find information about existing nanomaterials on the EU market. Whether you are developing policies in the area, a consumer or representing industry or a green NGO, the information on European Union Observatory for Nanomaterials (EUON) offers interesting reading about the safety, innovation, research and uses of nanomaterials.
The European EuroQUAM Program focuses on four themes with linked objectives: Atomic quantum gases with controllable interactions; Formation of molecules in ultracold atomic gases; Cooling molecules; and Ultracold plasmas and Rydberg gases.
The overall objective of EuroSQIP is to develop a 3/4-qubit quantum information processor (QIP) capable of running elementary quantum algorithms and protocols; demonstrating quantum state control of a macroscopic multi-partite system; demonstrating entanglement and entanglement transfer.
The Department of Chemistry & Nano Science offers a comprehensive program on the fundamentals of chemistry for students who wish to have a background for graduate study in chemistry as well as for students who want a professional job in related fields. The curriculum covers various fields of chemistry including analytical, physical, polymer, organic, inorganic, and bio- chemistry. It also provides an opportunity for research experience in the laboratory throughout the senior year.
EXCELL's objectives are aimed at overcoming the fragmentation of the European research landscape in the area of multifunctional films. EXCELL moves frontiers of science and technology related to multifunctional films and improves European competitiveness by technology transfer. EXCELL's results will find a wide range of applications such as low-friction coatings earmarked for a wide use in mechanical engineering, new protective anticorrosion nano-films to be used in construction, marine and land transportation, etc., novel coatings with imbedded nano-clusters to be used in computer industry, etc.
FAST-DOT is an experimental program funded under the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union to: Enable widespread application and further development of laser based photonics; Demonstrate new applications of lasers in biotechnology and medical fields; Develop new industrially integrated design rules for the production of specific quantum dot materials; Unlock the potential of quantum dot materials in biophotonics; Accelerate the implementation of quantum dot lasers through European SMEs and companies; Train a new generation of researchers in the range of new technological areas for quantum dot devices.
FIBLYS (or FIB anaLYSis) is a European funded project where leading researches and industry collaborate to create a new apparatus for nanotechnology that will unite nano-structuring, nano-manipulation, nano-analytic and nano-vision capabilities in one unique 'multi-nano' tool. It is based on a dual Focused Ion Beam (FIB) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) together with Scanning Probe Microscope (SPM) and optional possibility of important analytical capabilities such as Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX), 3D Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD), Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (TOFMS), Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC) or Cathodoluminescence (CL).
Flamac's objective is to become a competence centre in 'High Throughput Methodologies' to support research for the materials industry. Research includes Synthesis and characterization of submicron metal-oxide coatings via chemical vapor deposition.
The objective of FLEXONICS is the development of ultra-high barrier nanoscale films for r2r encapsulation of flexible electronics.
The FlexTech Alliance is the only organization headquartered in North America exclusively devoted to fostering the growth, profitability and success of the electronic display and flexible, printed electronics supply chain. Leveraging its rich history in promoting the display industry as the U.S. Display Consortium, the FlexTech Alliance offers expanded collaboration between and among industry, academia, and research organizations for advancing displays and flexible, printed electronics from R&D to commercialization.
The Institute's mission is to apply world-class, fundamental research and knowhow to provide novel, robust solutions to the challenges facing Australia, in the general areas of energy, health and water.
The mission of AMERI is to enable the development of future technologies by combining open-access, and state-of-the-art analytical/fabrication tools with innovative research ideas from award-winning faculty and industry across South Florida and throughout the world.
The research of the group interfaces with biomedical engineering, nanobiotechnology, electrochemistry, BioMEMS, biochemistry, nanomedicine, surface science, and materials science. The work done here looks ahead to the next generation of nanoelectrical components such as protein nanowires, DNA transistors as well as end use electronic devices such as Lab-on-Chip, biosensors and enzymatic biofuel cells.
The High-Performance Materials Institute at Florida State University is the pioneer in the process for manufacturing of carbon nanotube 'buckypapers'. The center has other research on-going in areas of nanotube systhesis, growth and nanocomposites.
INSI is an interdisciplinary initiative at Florida State University to foster a world-class program in the exciting emergent area of bio-nanoscience. The initiative builds on a solid foundation in bio-nanoscience at FSU that evolved from existing strengths in materials science, molecular and cell biology, chemical and biomedical engineering, chemistry and biochemistry, and physics.
The Bavarian research cooperation for miniaturised analysis techniques using nanotechnology.
The Nano- and Microsystems Program is aimed at developing application-tailored solutions. The group is pursuing interdisciplinary approaches based on a pool of technologies comprising mechanical, optical, magnetic, fluidic, electrical, materials science, and information technology competences. Our approach is characterized by the use of nanoscaled functional entities (materials, structures, components) in particular to develop innovative and economically attractive solutions.
FramingNano is an FP7 project funded by the European Commission. Its primary mission is to facilitate an international multi-stakeholder dialogue aimed at framing future regulatory actions that will foster the responsible development of nanotechnology.
This CMN is part of the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering.
The Fraunhofer Center for Nanoelectronic Technologies CNT in Dresden is an institution of the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft created as a public-private partnership with industrial partners Infineon Technologies AG and Advanced Micro Devices AMD and other research partners. The new Center was established with the aim of rapidly transferring innovative, discrete process solutions for the fabrication of nanoelectronic systems on 300-mm wafers into the industrial manufacturing environment.
ENAS deals with smart systems integration with micro- and nanotechnologies. Reasearch focuses on development of MEMS/NEMS, 3D-integration and reliability.
From organic LEDS for flat screens to drug delivery systems based on polymer nanoparticles - the IAP work hand in hand with the users of their polymers to develop the best material possible.
The Fraunhofer Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems covers the complete field of advanced ceramics, from basic research to applications. Services include the development and application of modern advanced ceramic materials, the development of industrial powder metallurgical technologies, and the manufacturing of prototypical components. Structural ceramics, functional ceramics and cermets are the main focus with emphasis on innovative complex systems which are applied in many industry sectors.
Research in nanocomposite materials for environmental applications.
Starting from the know-how already available and the experience in classical robotics, sensor technology and development of very fast controllers, new drive systems and tools for precision positioning up to the nanometer range are developed.
Research and development in the fields of microelectronics and nanoelectronics, power electronics, mechatronics, automotive electronics, and crystal growth.
Hybrid biological and synthetic particles have been developed which simulate the properties at the cell surfaces. On the surface of these cell-mimetic, i.e. cell-imitating, nanoparticles, membrane proteins are bound in such a way that their biological properties are fully maintained.
Researches coating technologies for nano materials.
Research and development in the areas of Powder technology, Casting technology, Light weight construction, Micro production technology, Functional Printing, Rapid Prototyping, Nanopowder Technology.
Deals with Board Interconnection Technologies (nanowires); Chip Interconnection Technologies (nanoscale structures); Lifetime prediction for nanoscaled materials relies on nanoanalytics (nanodeformation) and nanosimulation.
Micro- and nanostructured solar cell architectures.
Nearly one third of the currently 58 Institutes of the Fraunhofer Gesellschaft is working in the field of nanotechnology
FriMat combines a leading fundamental research program on soft condensed matter and solid state physics with an innovative approach to synthesize novel compounds in order to create and study advanced materials. FriMat is determined to not only focus on the creation of novel materials and promote nanotechnology, but investigates into potential risks associated with nanoparticles, and develops new tools essential in any attempt to sample and characterize nanoparticles in the environment.
The Friedrich Miescher Institute is devoted to fundamental biomedical research. As part of the Novartis Research Foundation and one of the institutes of Novartis Corporate Research, the institute's goal is to exploit new technologies to further the understanding of the basic molecular mechanisms of cells and organisms in health and disease.
The Frontiers consortium is designed on five criteria: individual excellence in science, excellent nanotechnology infrastructure (clean room facilities), proven capability to initiate start-ups on the basis of new technology, outstanding relations with nanotechnology initiatives all over the world and, finally, a proven track record in cooperating with other members of the consortium. Frontiers consists of 192 scientists from 11 different research institutions scattered over Europe.
The objective of the society is to create an opportunity to provide information concerning basic science and applied technology relating to nano carbon based materials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene and to provide an opportunity for members to get together.
The objective of this EU project is the investigation and deliberate steering of supramolecular self-organization using complex molecules at well-defined substrates for the fabrication of functional nanostructures.
(Site in Spanish) The official site of the Argentinean Nanotechnology Foundation.
FUNFOX is a European Commission funded program which will demonstrate the capabilities of photonic crystals (PhC) to provide miniature and improved semiconductor optoelectronic devices needed in metropolitan core and access segments of optical networks.
The joint research project of four institutes, entitled 'FUNgraphen' and funded by the German Federal Minister of Education and Research (BMBF), will build an innovation center aiming at the development of unconventional carbon nano materials, novel flat carbon macromolecules, nanocomposites and multilayer systems. Key components are large area ultrathin single layer carbon materials (graphene) with average diameter of around 0.1 nm as new 2D carbon macromolecules produced from natural graphite.
FUNMAT is a newly established national consortium for research within functional materials and nanotechnology and has four senior partners: The University of Oslo; Norwegian University for Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim; SINTEF, Trondheim and Oslo; Institute for Energy Technology (IFE).
GALAXY - GALs interfAce for compleX digital sYstem integration. This EU project proposes to provide an integrated GALS (Globally Asynchronous, Locally Synchronous) design flow, together with novel Network-on-Chip capabilities, that will materially aid embedded system design for a significant class of problems. The project will evaluate the ability of the GALS approach to solve system integration issues and, by implementing a complex wireless communication system on an advanced 45nm CMOS process, explore the low EMI properties, inherent low-power features and robustness to process variability problems in nanoscale geometries.
This MURI project at Georgia Tech is focused on a revolutionary new paradigm for fabricating micro/nanodevices: the synergistic use of genetic engineering, biological replication, and shape-preserving chemical conversion to generate enormous numbers of identical Genetically-Engineered Micro/nanodevices (GEMs) with tailored 3-D shapes, fine (meso-to-nanoscale) features, and chemistries.
The Mason Nanotechnology Initiative opens a space for discussion and planning of activities related to nanoscience and nanotechnology within Mason. The efforts target the development of new academic programs within the university that contain a strong component of subjects in science, mathematics and engineering, which are fundamental to nanoscience and nanotechnology.
The focus of research of this group is the synthesis, study and application of solid-state inorganic materials with technologically significant magnetic, electrical, optical, electrochemical or catalytic properties. Of particular interest are nanoscale (1 - 20 nm diameter) materials.
The CNCF in the School of Materials Science and Engineering, is a multi-user facility. Its mission is to provide the Georgia Tech campus with state-of-the-art tools for performing advanced research on a variety of nanoscale materials.
COPE is a premier national research and educational resource center that creates flexible organic photonic and electronic materials and devices that serve the information technology, telecommunications, energy, and defense sectors. COPE creates the opportunity for disruptive technologies by developing new materials with emergent properties and by providing new paradigms for device design and fabrication.
Since 2001 and the invention of graphene electronics the Georgia Tech epitaxial graphene research team led by Walt de Heer and its collaborators are developing the new field of epitaxial graphene electronics.
Dr. Filler's research group works at the interface of chemical engineering and materials science, emphasizing the atomic-level engineering of nanoscale semiconductors for applications in energy conversion, electronics, and photonics.
The Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology (IEN) at Georgia Tech was established as an Interdisciplinary Research Institute (IRI) with the goals of providing a central entry point and a central organization to enable interdisciplinary E&N related training, education, and research at Georgia Tech in partnership with outside entities.
The mission of the group is to advance the science and engineering of organic and hybrid nanostructured materials and enable technological innovations for applications in communications, sensing, displays, energy efficient solid-state lighting, and power generation.
The group's research focuses on nanostructured functional materials (NanoFM), including polymer-based nanocomposites, block copolymers, polymer blends, conjugated polymers, quantum dots (rods, tetrapods, wires), magnetic nanocrystals, metallic nanocrystals, semiconductor metal oxide nanocrystals, ferroelectric nanocrystals, multiferroic nanocrystals, upconversion nanocrystals, thermoelectric nancrystals, core/shell nanocrystals, hollow nanocrystals, Janus nanocrystals, nanopores, nanotubes, hierarchically structured and assembled materials, and semiconductor organic-inorganic nanohybrids. The goal of the research is to understand the fundamentals of these nanostructured materials.
The mission of Prof. Gleb Yushin's group is to develop innovative nanotechnology-driven solutions that would facilitate a cleaner environment, decreased energy consumption, safer and healthier lives for people around the globe, and other benefits to society. The group's current focus is directed towards the synthesis of innovative nanostructured materials for supercapacitors, fuel cells and batteries.
The Xia group is pursuing cutting-edge research in three major frontiers: nanotechnology, materials chemistry, and photonic devices. Recently, the group starts to move into cell biology by harnessing the power of nanomaterials to develop novel tools for studying complex biological systems.
Zhong L. Wang's research group at Georgia Institute of Technology focuses on the fundamental science in the physical and chemical processes in nanomaterials growth, unique properties of nanosystems, novel in-situ measurement techniques, and new applications of nano-scale objects.
Initiated and coordinated by BAuA, UBA (Federal Environment Agency), BfR (Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) and BAuA have developed a joint research strategy, that addresses especially health and environmental risks of engineered nanoparticles. The draft proposes 25 different projects on nanotechnology.
The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation) is the central self-governing organisation of science and research in Germany. As a publicly funded research foundation, the DFG's defined mission is to fund and promote all fields of science and the humanities. Major research focus is on nanotechnology.
The Centre brings together many different research groups working in engineering and the physical and life sciences. The Centre has comprehensive micro and nanofabrication facilities including one of the most advanced large area high resolution electron beam lithography tools in the world.
The GoodNanoGuide is a collaboration platform designed to enhance the ability of experts to exchange ideas on how best to handle nanomaterials in an occupational setting. It is meant to be an interactive forum that fills the need for up-to-date information about current good workplace practices, highlighting new practices as they develop.
GRADE is a three-year STREP proposal focused on advanced RTD activities necessary to demonstrate the proof-of-concept of novel graphene-based electronic devices operating at terahertz (THz) frequencies.
Will graphene really take the semiconductor industry towards the 'Beyond CMOS' era? Some answers to this key question are sought through experiment and simulation in this European research project on Graphene-based Nanoelectronic Devices called GRAND.
This EU pilot action GRAPHENE-CA paves the road to the FET Flagship "Graphene-Driven Revolutions in ICT and Beyond" (GRAPHENE). The GRAPHENE flagship ambition is to bring together a focused, interdisciplinary European research community that aims at a radical technology shift in information and communication technology that exploits the unique properties of graphene and related two-dimensional materials.
GreenFacts is an independent non-profit organization with a multi-stakeholder governance and a non-advocacy policy. Their mission is to bring complex scientific reports on health and the environment to the reach of non-specialists. One of the focus areas is nanotechnologies.
Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre is a science and engineering research centre investigating micro- and nanotechnology problems that are integral to the development of clean and intelligent systems. QMNC brings together researchers with expertise in the fundamental theory of materials, materials development, sensing, microelectronic engineering and microtechnology, across the disciplines of Physics, Chemistry, Applied Mathematics and Engineering. The QMNC has four principal research themes: 1)Sustainable energy technologies; 2) Novel devices and materials; 3) Complex systems and signals; 4)Theory and modelling
Research on fabricating and characterizing nanostructures involving individual molecules, nanoparticles, nanowires, and their arrays and assembling these nano-building blocks into electronic devices.
The lab of Prof. Haiwon Lee deals with AFM applications, carbon nanotube synthesis and applications, and polymer synthesis and applications.
Shiladitya Sengupta's laboratory is focused on developing engineering solutions for complex disease. The team's research lies at the interfaces of fundamental biology, medical applications and nanoscale engineering, where basic understanding of biology inspires the development of novel technology or medical applications.
Developing nanopores as probes.
The Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology at the Harvard School of Public Health draws on decades of experience with environmental pollutants and the health effects of particles to address the unique environmental health and safety (EHS) concerns raised by engineered nanomaterials (ENM) and nanotechnology applications.
The Lieber Research Group at Harvard focuses on the bottom-up paradigm for nanoscience and nanotechnology.
The Mazur group at Harvard University studies the dynamics of molecules, chemical reactions, and condensed matter on very short timescales - down to femtoseconds.
Park's group at Harvard probes physical and chemical properties of nanostructured materials and develops neuron-electronic interfaces.
KIBST seeks to develop a deeper understanding of the functioning of life and biology at the nanoscale level.
The Westervelt Group has three areas of focus: 1) Imaging the coherent flow of electrons inside semiconductor nanostructures at low temperatures using scanning probe microscopy; 2) Studies of tunnel-coupled quantum dots and the fabrication of artificial molecules composed of few-electron quantum dots to implement qubits for quantum information processing; 3) Development of micro-electromagnets to trap, move, and assemble particles.
The Zhuang research lab works on the forefront of single-molecule biology and bioimaging, developing and applying advanced optical imaging techniques to study the behavior of individual biological molecules and complexes in vitro and in live cells.
The main focus of the new HSPH-NIEHS Center is to bring together scientists from across disciplines- material science, chemistry, exposure assessment, risk assessment, nanotoxicology and nanobiology- to assess the potential environmental Health and safety (EHS) implications of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs).
The Nano Science research group at Hebrew University focusses on chemistry, physics and applications of semiconductor clusters, nanocrystals and nanorods.
The center is devoted to fundamental questions concerning the dynamics of quantum systems at the borderline between few-body and many-body physics.
PVcomB's main goal is to support world wide growth of thin-film photovoltaic technologies and -products by providing top level technology transfer.
The research of the group is focused on energy and sustainability. The research encompasses design, synthesis, functionalization, and self-assembly of nanoscale materials for applications in plasmonics, photonics, electronics, sensing, separation, and medicine. Using wet chemistry, electrospinning, physical deposition and their combinations, they aim to create nanomaterials and nanocomposites (e.g. metal, metal oxide, polymer, etc.) with diverse multifunctional properties for new technological applications.
The NanoMaterials Group is among the top aerosol technology laboratories in the world and offers a unique environment for strong interdisciplinary research and a proven track record of productive cooperation. The main research areas of the group are synthesis and mechanistic studies of formation of carbon nanotubes and nanoparticles, pharmaceutical materials, electron microscopy, and computational fluid dynamics modelling.
Nano-optics and work on self organization
The objectives of the HelsinkiNano initiative are to spur the Helsinki region into a central position in nanoscience and technology, promote the use of nanotechnology in commercial applications, and strengthen cooperation networks within the field.
(German language site) An initiative to support nanotechnology activities from the Ministry of Economy of the German state Hesse.
The RCNS consists of four research divisions: Nanodevice; Nanoprocess; Molecular Assembly and Materials Synthesis ; and System Design and Architecture.
Hokkaido Innovation through NanoTechnology Support (HINTS) is a nanotechnology support project centered at Hokkaido University (Research Institute for Electronic Science, Catalysis Research Center, Center for Advanced Research of Energy Conversion Materials, and Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics) with close cooperation of Chitose Institute of Science and Technology.
The group studies unsolved biological problems in terms of applied physics toward elucidating the nature of life and developing the state-of-the-art technology.
Holst Centre is an independent centre for open innovation, which develops generic technologies and technology platforms for wireless autonomous transducer solutions and systems-in-foil.
In partnership with local industries, NAMI will conduct market-driven, demand-led development of nanotechnology and advanced materials.
Main research interests include soft condensed matter physics, electrorheological and magnetorheological fluids, field-induced pattern and structure transitions, micro- and nano-fluidic controlling, microsphere and nanoparticle fabrications, thin film physics, band gap materials, metamaterials and nonlinear optical materials.
The mission of the INST is to pursue world-class fundamental research in the area of nanostructured materials.
The primary task of the Department of Biological Nanochemistry is the preparation and characterisation of nanosized systems for medical applications.
The Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry studies functional and structural materials, micro- and nanosized surface layers and solid/liquid interfaces in order to reveal correlations among their chemical composition, structure, properties and methods of preparation. The institute is involved in research aimed at developing new procedures and methods decreasing environmental impact of technologies.
The mission of the Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science is to conduct multidisciplinary research on complex functional materials and nanometer-scale structures targeting the exploration of physical, chemical and biological principles, and their exploitation in integrated micro- and nanosystems.
Scanning tunneling microscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.
The Binnig and Rohrer Nanotechnology Center is a unique facility for exploratory research. It is not a production or a pilot line with fixed processes or wafer sizes. Rather, it is a state-of-the-art exploratory cleanroom fabrication facility combined with 'noise-free' labs shielded against external vibrations, acoustic noise, electromagnetic fields and temperature fluctuations.
Conducts research on nanomaterials.
The purpose of the nanotechnology committee of the IEC is to deal with the relevant nanotechnological aspects in developing generic standards for electrical and electronic products and systems. Typically, these concern electronics, optics, magnetics and electromagnetics, electroacoustics, multimedia, telecommunication, and energy production and, more specifically, terminology and symbols, measurement and performance, reliability, design and development, electromagnetic compatibility.
A non-profit organization, IEEE is the world's leading professional association for the advancement of technology. The IEEE name was originally an acronym for the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. Today, the organization's scope of interest has expanded into so many related fields, that it is simply referred to by the letters I-E-E-E.
The IEEE Nanotechnology Council is a multi-disciplinary group whose purpose is to advance and coordinate work in the field of Nanotechnology carried out throughout the IEEE in scientific, literary and educational areas. The Council supports the theory, design, and development of nanotechnology and its scientific, engineering, and industrial applications.
The IMDEA Nanociencia Foundation, created by a joint initiative of the regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Education of the Government of Spain, manages the IMDEA Nanociencia Institute. This new interdisciplinary research centre aims at becoming a flexible framework to create new internationally competitive research groups by hybridizing some of the best scientists in Madrid dedicated to the exploration of basic nanoscience with recognized researches recognized elsewhere recruited on an internationally competitive basis.
IMEC (Interuniversity MicroElectronics Centre) is Europe's leading independent research center in the field of micro- and nanoelectronics, nanotechnology, enabling design methods and technologies for ICT systems. Its research focuses on the next generations of chips and systems, and on the enabling technologies for ambient intelligence.
The main research topics are: Nanomagnetic Logic Devices; Nanoscale Hall-probe Devices; Technology for Preventing Forgery; Smart Nanoparticles for Targeted Cancer Treatment; Fundamental Properties of Nanoscale Magnetism.
The group, led by Prof. Milo Shaffer, focuses on the synthesis and applications of nanomaterials, particularly carbon nanotubes and other nanocarbons.
Nanomaterials and nanostructures, with main areas of expertise: silicon nanoelectrode arrays, low-frequency noise in nanostructured materials; porous silicon layers; field emission nanostructures; biofunctional nanostructures and interfaces.
iNANOschool is a graduate school in nanoscience and nanotechnology at the University of Aarhus and Aalborg University.
The group's research focus is on the synthesis and application of one- and two-dimensional materials.
The Centre for Nano Science and Engineering (CeNSE) was established in 2010 to pursue interdisciplinary research across several disciplines with a focus on nanoscale systems. Current research topics include, but are not limited to nanoelectronics, MEMS/NEMS, nanomaterials and devices, photonics, nano-biotechnology, solar cells and computational nano-engineering.
The NCF provides faculty, staff, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate and undergraduate students with state-of-the-art instrumentation for generating and characterizing materials having features with nanometer dimensions.
The scope of ITRI Nanotechnology covers aspects in electronics, data storage, packaging, energy, display, photonics, biotechnology, platform technology, application in traditional industries, and facilities built-up.
InfoNano is the central federal information platform for nanotechnology in Switzerland. The Federal Offices of Public Health, for the Environment and for Agriculture, the Commission for Technology and Innovation, Swissmedic and the State Secretariats for Economic Affairs as well as for Education and Research are involved in the website.
InForm is a network of institutions funded through FP7 Theme 4: Nanosciences, nanotechnologies, materials and new production technologies to promote discussions in the field of nanotechnologies and nanoscale in formulations.
The EU FP6 INNOVATIAL project addresses the area 'Nanotechnologies and nano-sciences, knowledge-based multifunctional materials and new production processes and devices'.
The overall aim of the initiative is to establish a key market for the technology of carbon nanotubes in Germany, which will serve as a global leader in the field of innovative carbon nanomaterials. For this purpose, a large group of around 80 expert partners from industry and science have joined forces to form a strong, interdisciplinary innovation alliance known as Inno.CNT.
INSPIRE (formally known as NANOTEIRE) is a consortium of all Irish third level institutions with international leading research capability in nanoscience and nanotechnology. INSPIRE exists to foster, facilitate and ultimately ensure collaboration and partnership between top ranking Irish and international scientists and engineers in nanoscience research and education. INSPIRE will enable Ireland to join an elite group of the highest ranking nanoscience countries worldwide making it an increasingly attractive location for relevant indigenous and foreign investment.
ICN is focused on theoretical study, experimental observation and control of matter at the nanometric scale, synthesis and fabrication, functionalization, characterization and applications of nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes and the development of nanosensors.
The group carries out research on the integration of nanotechnology methods, tools and materials into low cost, user friendly and efficient sensors and biosensors.
The IBMB is dedicated to the study of the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in biological processes relevant for the development and the physiology of the living organisms. Includes nanobiology.
A foundation of the state of Baden-Württemberg in Germany, the Institute for Microelectronics Stuttgart is involved in industry-oriented research in silicon technology, application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), photo lithography and image sensors as well as vocational education.
The Institute Jean Lamour (IJL) is a new Mixed Research Unity of The French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS). With around 450 people, including 150 researchers and teacher-researchers, 90 technical and administrative staff, 150 PhD students and 60 post-docs, long-term visitors and students, the Institute is organized around three scientific departments (Matter Physics and Materials, Chemistry and Physics of Solids and Surfaces, Science and Engineering of Materials and Metallurgy) and eight centers of competence.
Research concerns the study of advanced functional materials and nanoscopic systems with a purely organic or metal-organic nature (either molecular solids or polymers) and useful electronic (superconductors, metallic conductors, semiconductors), magnetic (ferromagnets, superparamagnets, single molecule magnets, nanporous magnets, etc), and/or optical properties, and materials processing using compressed fluids and nanotechnology.
Group activity focuses on the controlled and rational synthesis of inorganic and hybrid (inorganic-organic) nanoparticles and nanocomposites and the study of their structural -functional properties. Among others, they are currently interested in the stabilization of metastable phases, the preparation of core-shell nanoparticles, stable colloidal dispersions and porous nanocomposites.
AMOLF is one of five research institutes of the Dutch Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter (FOM). The current research at AMOLF focuses on three areas: Life science inspired physics, nanophysics and femtosecond dynamics of matter
This group at the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden deals with nanoscale research in areas such as photonics, electronics, nanomaterials design, quantum optics, or biophysics.
IMM is a nonprofit foundation formed in 1991 to conduct and support research on molecular systems engineering and molecular manufacturing (molecular nanotechnology, or MNT). IMM also promotes guidelines for research and development practices that will minimize risk from accidental misuse or from abuse of molecular nanotechnology.
The IMS, part of the National Institute of Natural Sciences, investigates fundamental properties of molecules and molecular assemblies through both experimental and theoretical methods.
The Institute is the Italian leading center for the growth and chemical-physical characterization of molecular thin films, and it is involved in several European Community Projects.
The Institute for New Materials has already been concentrating since 1990 on the research in and development of new nanomaterials to production maturity and is a European center of chemical nanotechnology for material innovations.
The main aim of CNR, based in Rome, is the study and fabrication of advanced devices for photonics, optoelectronics and electronics. Nanotechnologies play a prominent role in these research fields. The combined expertise in nanofabrication, materials and photonics creates a synergy able to compete in this very new and challenging field.
The Department's efforts are focused on the utilization of plasmonic effects in metallic nanostructures in the molecular ensemble, and their integration in technical environments.
The Department, the first of its kind in Iran, was set up in March 2003 in a brand new building to concentrate the research on all aspects of computational nano-science, and to help promote the fields of nano-science and nano-technology across the country.
IBN was established to spearhead the advancement of biomedical sciences in Singapore. A member of the A*STAR's biomedical sciences institutes, IBN is a leading national program with an international vision and a dynamic interdisciplinary research environment.
The Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague (ICT) is the biggest educational institution of its kind in Central Europe. Research includes Nanomaterials, nanoelectronics, thin films.
ICCOM consists of a head office and laboratories in Florence and two stations located in the Universities of Pisa and Bari. Reserach areas include fuel cells, nanostructured metal-based materials, high-tech polymeric materials, green chemistry, and molecules of pharmaceutical interest.
The main research focus of the Centre concentrates on the subject of Physics and Technology of Photonic Nanostructures.
IEMN is a research institute created by the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), two universities and an Engineer school of France's northern region. The IEMN scientific activity covers a large domain going from the physics of materials and nanostructures to microwaves, telecommunications and acoustics instrumentation.
Nanomaterials and nanocomposites (eg photocatalysts for environmental applications, lamellar pigments based on mica coated with metal oxide layers).
The scientific activities of IMS are grouped into a number of research programs of high scientific and technological interest in materials science, with focus in materials related with nanotechnology (especially magnetic and semiconducting nanostructures), novel superconducting materials, as well as functional materials prepared with soft-chemistry techniques.
ICFO targets the core of the current and future widespread applications of optical technologies, including remote sensing, biophotonics, quantum information, and nanotechnologies.
Since its foundation in 1992, the IPHT has performed top-rank research and development receiving worldwide appreciation. Its present concentration on photonic technology aims at strengthening its existing scientific and technological competences and to expand into new areas of modern optics. The institute's ambitious goal is to be among the world?s leading developers of photonic technology and its applications.
G-CNN is a multidisciplinary group, internationally recognised in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology. G-CNN has wide exsperience and expertise in synthesis, functionalization, processing and characterization of carbon nanotubes. G-CNN is specialized in the development of highly functional advanced nanocomposites.
The main mission of this Institute is to create new fundamental and applied knowledge in materials of high technological impact, their processing and their transfer to the productive sectors at local, national and International scales, the training of new professionals, and the dissemination of the scientific knowledge.
The aim of this research group is to study systems at the nanometer scale. In particular they study molecules, atomic layers with thickness in the nanometer range and atomically clean surfaces. The group tries to find out which is the atomic or molecular structure and the specific electronic properties derived from the low-dimensionality of the systems.
A joint center of the Agencia Estatal Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC - Spanish National Research Council) and the Universidad de Sevilla. Together with its counterpart institutes in Barcelona and Madrid, it forms part of the Centro Nacional de Microelectronica (CNM - National Microelectronics Center).
The core area 'Vacuum Technology and Nanofabrication' at ITRC provides advanced vacuum system development, thin film and micro/nano structure fabrication and measurement service platform.
The overall objective of the INTELTEX project is to develop a radically new approach to obtain intelligent textiles combining three innovative functions: continuous measurement of mechanical stresses applied to the textile structure; thermal self regulated textile surfaces; detection of chemicals (toxic volatile solvents).
InterNano is an open-source online information clearinghouse for the nanomanufacturing research and development community in the United States. It is designed to provide this community with an array of tools and collections relevant to its work and to the development of viable nanomanufacturing applications.
The Academy has as its main goal to provide a forum for international contact and collaboration and a periodical evaluation of the main developments, advances and promising directions of research in the broad field of the application of quantum mechanics to the study of molecules and macromolecules.
MANA will bring together outstanding researchers from Japan and other countries to conduct advanced materials research contributing to a sustainable society under a number of top scientists from NIMS.
The INL International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, located in Braga (North of Portugal) was founded by the governments of Portugal and Spain under an international legal framework to perform interdisciplinary research, deploy and articulate nanotechnology for the benefit of society. INL aims to become the world-wide hub for nanotechnology addressing society?s grand challenges.
INL- International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory is the first, and so far the only one, fully international research organization in Europe in the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology. It has an international legal framework similar to the few international laboratories in other areas located in Europe like CERN - European Organization for Nuclear Research at Geneva, ESO - European Southern Observatory, EMBL - European Molecular Biology Laboratory, ESRF - European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The new laboratory is being established by Portugal and Spain, but in the future will be open to the membership of other countries of Europe and other regions of the world.
An organization dedicated to the promotion of Nanotribology
ISO Committee TC 229 addresses standardization in the field of nanotechnologies. Specific tasks include developing standards for: terminology and nomenclature; metrology and instrumentation, including specifications for reference materials; test methodologies; modelling and simulations; and science-based health, safety, and environmental practices.
Farsi language site.
(website in Farsi) This network concentrates on providing the researchers and the active industries in nanotechnology in Iran with laboratory services and covers the most of technical fields including engineering, medicine, basic science, agriculture, nano-biotechnology, etc.
The INNI mission is to make nanotechnology the next wave of successful industry in Israel by creating an engine for global leadership. A primary task for the INNI is to promote fruitful collaboration between Israeli and global nanotechnology stakeholders, particularly for projects that lead to continuing success in academia and industry.
The Nanochemistry Lab is a group of researchers dedicated to the study of new materials using weak chemical forces such as Van der Waals interactions, Hydrogen Bonds, Electrostatic forces, hydrophobicity, etc. These interactions are the same ones ruling the activity and structure of proteins and cell membranes, and allow to self-assemble small molecules and nanometric objects into complex architectures, using the principles of supramolecular chemistry. The Lab, led by Vincenzo Palermo, is part of CNR MAFO research unit.
The Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies establishes a large scale facility for bio-molecular and organic materials and nanoscale biomolecular interactions. The main target is the development of nanostructured materials with advanced mechanical, chemical and electronic functionalities and the investigation of the cellular toxicity of such nanostructured compounds, in view of future nano-safety standards of certification.
The center is an interdisciplinary R&D center dedicated to the investigation and exploitation of phenomena at the nanoscale. It is organized in three Divisions: Nanomedicine, Power Nanosystems, and Nanoscale Processes and Tools.
Research areas include Hybrid Nanophotonics, Hybrid LEDs, Perovskite Solar Cells, and Silicon Nanophotonics.
An international association of companies and institutes in the field of microtechnology, nanotechnology and advanced materials.
The CREST Nanotoxicity Center that consists of an interdisciplinary group of researchers from Chemistry, Physics, Biology and Engineering performs comprehensive investigations of nanomaterials that will strengthen the research infrastructure of Jackson State University. The research projects include different aspects of the development and production of nanomaterials and investigations of their toxicity.
The TEAM project carries out a project: Correlations and coherence in quantum materials and structures (CCQM) - unique properties on macro and nanoscales.
The mission of this Centre is to promote forefront basic and applied research in the fields of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, with potential applications towards fulfilling national strategic needs. The main research focus of the Centre includes Nano-fabrication & Nano-device, Nano-materials & Nano-structures, Nano-biotechnology & Nano-medicine, Nano-structure characterization & measurements.
Research activities include synthesis and characterization of a variety of nanoobjects-tubes, wires and particles of different materials, their chemical modification and organization as well as thin films and powders of transition metal oxides showing interesting physical properties.
The group's approach to exploring new properties arising in nanostructured materials is to integrate their research starting from the production of particles, their characterization and assembly to designed structures, the physical investigation of such structures and the modeling and understanding of the results.
Professor Bowen's research interests are centered around clusters and nanoparticles. A major objective of Dr. Bowen's research is to provide a molecule's eye view of many-body, condensed phase interactions. The study of size-specific and composition-specific clusters provides an incisive means of addressing this fundamental and longstanding problem in physical chemistry.
The Institute for Nanobiotechnology has been established at Hopkins to bring together expertise from the fields of nanotechnology, biotechnology, biology, medicine, and engineering to enable the creation of new knowledge and new technologies.
The JONAS Research Network (Joint Research Network on Advanced Materials and Systems) incorporates four European partners: the I.S.I.S. Institute at Strasbourg University, Freiburg University, and ETH Zurich - as academic partners, and BASF SE, as the industry partner. The close cooperation of three leading European universities with BASF enables all partners to extend the scientific basis and their understanding of future materials and systems.
The Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering (JSNN) has been formed through a collaboration between North Carolina A&T State University and The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. JSNN's research and educational programs focus on the emerging areas of nanoscience and nanoengineering. The strengths of the two universities in the basic sciences and in engineering make them ideal partners for this new, interdisciplinary school.
The Center develops a rigorous research focus on using sustainable agriculture-based nanomaterials which could lead to breakthrough discoveries in the treatment and diagnosis of animal diseases, improve food safety, as well as interface closely with the infectious disease community supporting NBAF research initiatives.
The Institute of Nanotechnology (INT) was founded in 1998 on the initiative of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and the Universities of Karlsruhe and Strasbourg. The institute aims at performing research in selected fields of nanotechnology on a worldwide accepted level.
Research topics: Metamaterials, Photonic Crystals, Optical Near-Field Spectroscopy.
The Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska Institutet is a novel initiative aimed to promote efficient integration of cutting edge technologies and medical research. In this interdisciplinary setting, a scientific environment is established with the aim to solve biological and medical problems using various kinds of nano-technological approaches.
The Center aims to stimulate nanoscience and microsystems technology activity in Lithuania and Baltic region by participating in European and global networks, research projects and by dissemination of information.
The central scientific focus of the Kavli Institute at Cornell is to ddress the major challenges and opportunities for science at the atomic and molecular scale.
iCONM strives to improve the cure rate for the global threat of refractory diseases.
The PMNP Laboratory (Yan research group) is interested in high-accuracy, high-efficiency, resource-saving manufacturing technologies. Through micro/nanometer-scale material removal, deformation, and surface property control, new products with high added value are provided to micromechanical, optical, optoelectronic, and biomechanical applications. The group is exploring multidisciplinary R&D by interfacing with mechanical science, physics, material science and nanotechnology.
The objectives of the Kimmel center for Nanoscale Science is to encourage research in this burgeoning scientific discipline in general, and to help establish the links between molecular biology and nanoscale science, in particular.
The research in the group involves the development and applications of advanced photonic technologies and of novel nanomaterials to address modern challenges in photonic and quantum technologies, new nanostructured materials, sensing, imaging and clean energy. The group adopts an interdisciplinary approach to provide leading-edge research in optical, mechanical and structural properties of nanostructures and nanoparticles.
This virtual centre of expertise brings together leading edge academic research and expertise in applied materials chemistry at the universities of Bolton, Liverpool, Manchester and the molecular modelling capabilities of the Science and Technology Facilities Council at Daresbury, all in the UK. KCMC aims to drive industrial growth for the UK chemistry-using industries through the coordination, development and exploitation of leading edge materials chemistry research.
Major research topics are Optical Properties of Mesoscopic Particles; Fabrication and Characterization of Novel Carbonaceous Nano-Materials; Surface Plasmon and Near-Field Optics; and Optical Waveguides and Other Photonic Devices
Kolektor Nanotesla Institute is a R&D center that builds on significant expertise in field of nanomaterials and composites, microwave applications and magnetism.
The group uses polymeric templating, electrospinning, nanomaterials synthetic techniques to explore novel and versatile synthesis routes for producing multi-dimensional nanostructures and various metallic, metal-oxide nanomaterials and nanoinks optimized for applications to energy, environment, and nanoelectronics.
The group's research focuses on condensed-matter physics and materials chemistry of metal phosphates and oxides, and materials design and synthesis for advanced lithium batteries, covering atomic-scale characterization with HREM and STEM, and nanostructure control of materials interfaces.
The group conducts research on bioinspired materials relevant for energy-related nanomaterials.
The group is interested in enhancing device performances by using novel nanotechnologies. They are studying new self-assembly materials forming sub-10 nm nanostructures based on polymers and nanoparticles. Their novel self-assembling systems aim for much superior precision, reliability, and reproducibility that are adequate for large-scale manufacturing of nanoscale devices. Applications include sub-10 nm lithography, information storage devices and energy storage/capture devices.
The group does research on advanced CMOS technology, flexible semiconductor device, and thermoelectric power generator to bring about an innovation in the academic and industrial world.
The research center is involved in the development of nanobiochips, nanobiosensors and nanobiomaterials by utilizing biocontents.
The lab offers quick and comprehensive solutions matching the needs of clients applying achievements in technology in the areas of nanotechnology, biotechnology, energy-, and environment-related technologies.
The Electrum Laboratory constitutes a world-class resource for education, research, development and small scale production for micro and nano fabrication.
Materials science has traditionally been an important research area at KTH with strong ties to the Swedish industry. In addition to the internationally highly competitive research in traditional materials, KTH has strong research in nanoscience and nanotechnology, which is used to study and tailor material structures.
This Stockholm-based research program is a collective effort of research groups with different disciplinary competencies. Basically, the development of new, innovative tools, technologies and methodologies for chemical synthesis, analysis and biochemical diagnostics, performed in nanolitre to femtolitre domains is the major goal of the programme.
Research on quantum Josephson circuits, nanostructured proteins and spintronics.
The lab tries to construct and establish a new concept of semiconductor materials research, that is, semiconductor exciton photonics. Research includes growth techniques for low dimensional or nano-scale structures by atomic-scale controlling of surfaces and interfaces together with excitonic and photonic properties.
Research in the group involves searching for new optoelectrical phenomenons in atomic structures, which result from new quantum phenomenons as well as the co-existence of light and electrons. Design of new optoelectronics devices.
Research areas include Parallel Processors, Super-Scalar Technology, Nano-Fabrication Technology, High Speed Devices, Smart Sensors, Interconnection Technology and Micromachining.
The research activities of this group focus on creating, understanding and controlling materials on the scale of nanometres. We have a strong focus on surface science, in particular, exploring chemical and molecular properties and processes at surfaces and at interfaces.
A large French clean room facility with competences in Micro and Nano electronics.
In past decades, nanostructured materials have shown promise of revolutionizing a number of areas, including theranostic, electronic, and photonic materials. Applications of these fields include yet a wider range of specialities, which can be incorporated into sensor material design. This shall be the focus of the MEAN Lab; fundamental material properties and applications of nanomaterials to sensor design. The MEAN Lab shall span a spectrum of expertise (e.g. - nanomaterials, bionanotechnology, interfacial science, electrochemistry), all of which fall under the umbrella of sensor design.
The Quantum Technology Centre contains state-of-the-art nanofabrication facilities, supported by molecular beam epitaxy reactors for atomic layer-by-layer growth of semiconductor nanostructures and devices. Fabrication techniques available include electron-beam lithography using a dedicated electron-beam writer, plasma processing and thin-film deposition. Electronic structures are measured at temperatures down to 10 mK and below by means of DC, microwave and pulse techniques. Photonic structures are characterized using a variety of specialist (0-17 Tesla) magneto-optics and (4-300 K) spectroscopy techniques, x-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy methods.
Research, development, and consulting are the main tasks of the LZH.The close cooperation between production engineers, material scientists, and physicists makes it possible that interdisciplinary solutions are found in all fields of laser applications, including nanotechnology.
Conducts nanotechnology research in various areas and has a number of nanotechnology transfer opportunities.
Conducts nanscience and nanotechnology research in various areas such as nanosensors and nanomaterials.
The Lehigh Emerging Technologies Network (LETN), formerly the Lehigh Nanotech Network (LNN), was founded by Lehigh University in 2004, comprising a diverse group of business, education, government, economic development, and services/consulting members. We bring members together to learn about applications, research, funding opportunities, and educational initiatives, and to advance the understanding, development, and commercialization of novel materials technology. The LETN also supports education and outreach for student development. Membership is open to any company or organization with interest in materials or nanotechnology.
Lehigh's SEM courses were founded by Joe Goldstein in 1970. More than three decades later, the Lehigh Microscopy School is widely recognized as the largest and best in the world.
The centers mission is to identify, promote and engage in strategic areas of research and education in advanced materials and nanotechnology that meet the needs of industry, government and students.
The institute is part of the Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research.
Chemical nanotechnology that has been highly developed by the INM represents a new dimension in nanoscience, which was dominated by physics for a very long time.
The Leibniz Institute for Surface Modification carries out basic and applied research on physical and chemical mechanisms which are important at fabrication and modification of isolating, metallic, semi-conducting and polymeric surface layers. Low-energetic ions, electrons, plasma as well as VUV and UV photons are employed.
The researchers at the IPF work towards understanding the effects of interfaces and the utilization of interface design in material development, in which nanotechnological aspects as well as interfaces to biosystems are of great importance.
The lab's goals are basic research and application-oriented engineering in the nanoscale accompanied by appropriate interdisciplinary training.
The Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory has 6 research groups that deal with Atomic and Molecular Conductors, Interface Physics, Magnetic and Superconducting Materials, Quantum Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Quantum Physics and Applications at Ultra Low Temperatures, Granular & Disordered Media, and Physics of Surfaces and Materials.
A joint enterprise with Imperial College London, the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN) has been designed to act as a focus for current interdisciplinary nanoscale materials and device research.
Conducts research in nanomaterials.
Research in the area of physics and chemistry of nanoscale structures built from chemically generated nanoparticles.
The core competency of the ?nanofabrication? research group is to synthesize variety of nanoparticles, characterize them using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and utilize them to fabricate devices for biomedical applications.
Includes research areas in nanotechnology and biomedical nanotechnology.
various research groups dealing with nanoscale physics.
The Nanometer Structure Consortium is the host to several national and international research programs in the area of nanoscience.
The Lyon Institute of Nanotechnology (INL) is a fundamental and applied research laboratory in the field of micro- and nano-technology. Its mission is to conduct research towards the development of fully-fledged technologies for a broad range of application sectors (semiconductors and micro-electronics, telecoms, energy, health, biology, industrial control, defence, environment).
At the CNBP the team use the power of light to measure, seeking to understand the complex molecular processes that underpin the living body, as well as other dynamic biological systems. Their approaches and technologies encompass Discovery - of chemical, nanomaterial and fibre based light responsive tools - that Sense and that can also Image. Bringing these three core capability areas together, the Center scientists are driving the development of innovative new molecular sensing tools that have broad application across the biosciences, medical, agriculture, food and manufacturing sectors.
MAFIN aimed at developing a new magnetic recording media at prove-of-concept level for ultrahigh density magnetic storage applications, by using low-cost, environmentally friendly processes and both advanced and new nanotechnologies. The MAFIN project successfully ended in May 2009. Reserach on magnetic storage is continued within the TERAMAGSTOR project.
MAGMANet is an interdisciplinary Network of Excellence that focuses on the magnetic properties of molecular based systems. The consortium comprises 22 leading European players in the field from 8 EU states plus Romania and Switzerland. The entire range of expertise necessary for carrying out research in molecular magnetism is involved, from theoretical and solid state physics, to synthetic organic and inorganic chemistry.
Focused on Molecular Engineering and Devices
MANCEF globally supports the creation, exchange, and dissemination of knowledge vital to people, organizations, and governments interested in the commercialization of miniaturization technologies.
This European Nanotechnologies Project is funded by the European Commission Sixth Framework Programme, under priority 3: Nanotechnology and nanosciences, knowledge-based multifunctional materials and new production processes and devices (NMP). The first level objective of the project is to provide the manufacturing industry with an entirely new platform for manufacturing (i.e. even beyond micromanufacturing), by way of the high productivity, high resolution, direct, one step laser sintering process.
A 300-acre greenfield site designed to become the nanoelectronics manufacturing and R&D cluster for the state of New York.
Maryland NanoCenter has been established as a partnership among three University of Maryland colleges: The A. James Clark School of Engineering, the College of Computer, Math, and Physical Sciences (CMPS), and the College of Chemical and Life Sciences, with sustaining support from all three and the campus.
The Institute Center for Microsystems (iMicro) is focused on advanced research and innovations in microsystem technologies that are of importance to the UAE's emerging semiconductor industry.
The Nanotechnology Program at CMIR at Harvard University develops, optimizes and validates creative approaches to diagnosis and treatment of human disorders
The focus of Prof. Haverkamp's research is on nanotechnology applied to soft and hard materials.
The Materials Research Society is a not-for-profit organization which brings together scientists, engineers and research managers from industry, government, academia and research laboratories to share findings in the research and development of new materials of technological importance
Research on dynamics and self organization covers nanobio complexity.
The mission of the Department Structure and Nano-/Micromechanics is: to develop experimental methods to perform quantitative nano-/micromechanical and tribological tests for complex and miniaturized materials;to unravel the underlying deformation mechanisms by advanced microstructure characterization techniques from the micrometer level down to atomic dimensions; to establish material laws for local and global mechanical behavior; and to generate nanostructured materials and high temperature intermetallic materials with superior mechanical properties.
A group of physicists, biologists, chemists and engineers conceiving inventing and utilizing optical microscopes with resolution at the nanometer scale to advance life sciences.
Dealing with chemical and physical aspects of nanoscience and nanotechnology.
Research efforts in the Department are centered on nanometer-scale science and technology, primarily focussing on solid state phenomena that are determined by small dimensions and interfaces.
The creation of novel materials with targeted functionalities is the ultimate goal in several scientific and technological fields, ranging from chemistry and pharmaco-chemistry to molecular electronics and renewable energies. Molecular modelling and simulation are vital components of the scientific investigation of materials, as well as essential tools to engineer novel materials with improved performances. Future advances in this field should systematically address the challenge of bridging the gap between simulations and experiments. To this end, a unifying theme of this research is the development of a modelling framework for the investigation of materials. Through the creative synthesis of traditional all-atom simulations, electronic structure methods, and rare events techniques, we apply a multiscale approach to the study of materials and nanostructures.
Four departments: Biomaterials, Colloid Chemistry, Interfaces as well as Theory and Bio-Systems. Current research topics are polymeric films, membranes, micro- capsules, organic and inorganic nano- structures, biomineralization, nanoreactors or molecular motors.
Experimental and theoretical research carried out at the Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics is primarily focussed on solid state phenomena that are determined by small dimensions and surfaces and interfaces. The investigations concentrate on establishing relations between the magnetic, electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of solids and their microstructure. Thin films and surfaces are investigated as well as nanocrystalline materials, phase boundaries and defects in bulk crystals.
Investigation of semiconductors and devices for optoelectronic applications including photovoltaic energy conversion and optical communications. Development of thin film transistors for electronic displays and imaging systems.
The group's research in micro- and nanobioengineering is focused on miniaturizing biological experimentation to microscopic scales and progresses along two axes: Firstly, create tools and use them for precisely controlling and varying the cellular microenvironment, which will allow studying the response of cells and groups of cells to external cues and stimuli applied to single cells. Secondly, the large scale parallelization of the biological experiments for both protein analysis and cell biological experiments.
The focus of the research program is to apply the recently developed tools, techniques and materials to the emerging field of Nanoelectronics.
The group's research focuses on the application and development of advanced microscopy techniques to study the structure of materials at very high spatial resolution. The core area of research is based on transmission electron microscopy methods but they also use scanning probe techniques and other characterization techniques to provide information on how the structure of materials affects the properties these materials exhibit.
MBI's primary focus is to identify, measure and describe how the forces for motility and morphogenesis are expressed at the molecular, cellular and tissue level. Toward that goal, the group is working to create a common international standard for defining these steps by developing powerful new computational models, experimental reagents, and tools for studying diseases of cells and tissues. The goal is then to transfer these basic discoveries to both the clinic and the classroom.
The Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication is the Victorian Node and headquarters of the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF). Opened in July 2010, this multi-user research facility is operating the largest purpose-built cleanroom complex in the Southern Hemisphere. Drawing upon the wealth of knowledge within six Universities and CSIRO, they are uniquely placed in a thriving cosmopolitan world-centre enabling us to bridge the gaps between scientific disciplines and commercial needs.
The Virtual Institute for Artificial Electromagnetic Materials and Metamaterials, in short the 'METAMORPHOSE VI AISBL', is a non-for-profit International Association, whose purposes are the research, the study and the promotion of artificial electromagnetic materials and metamaterials.
'Bringing intelligence into micro-nano-systems' - The focus of this research group is integration of adaptive and machine learning techniques with micro-systems to achieve ultra-low power and robust operation.
The CMSC is a multidisciplinary facility that is focused on research on composite materials, processing and design as well as transfer of composites technology to industry.
The MOE lab focuses on inorganic and organic excitonic materials for solar energy production and utilization. They look to exploit oriented, crystalline, nanostructured and excitonic films through organic-inorganic and organic-organic interactions while studying fundamental relationships between structure and photophysical properties.
Nanotechnology at MichiganTech
The lab research activity is devoted to the synthesis and characterization of nanostructured films and surfaces, clusters and nanostructures.
Micronova is a center for the design, development and fabrication of micro- and nanosystems. Micronova is run jointly by the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Helsinki University of Technology (TKK).
Nanomicrowave is a Marie Curie Initial Training Network (ITN) aiming to train a new generation of multidisciplinary researchers in the field of nanoscale microwave technologies and related emerging applications. The consortium consists of three industrial partners and seven academic and research institutions.
MANA is a collaboration to develop and position the tri-state region (PA, NJ, DE) as a global hub for the expanded research, development, application and commercialization of nanotechnology
(Site in Dutch) A network to strengthen the economic acitivities of companies active in the areas of micro- an nanotechnologies.
The aim of the network MINAEAST-NET is to prepare the participation of organisations from associated candidate countries (ACCs) for projects in FP6 in the area of Micro and Nano Technologies (MNT). The main objective is networking on micro and nanotechnologies, according to priority thematic areas 2 (IST) and 3 (NMP) from FP 6.
A 'competitiveness cluster' that brings together major corporations, small and mid-sized businesses, government agencies, and organizations from the public and private sectors to develop a unique hybrid of micro- and nanotechnologies and embedded software.
A major French regional nanotech research center in Grenoble.
MINOS-EURONET is devoted to stimulating, encouraging and facilitating the participation of New Member States (NMS) and the Associated Candidate Countries (ACC) in the activities of IST. The proposal has a pan-European focus on one strategic objective in IST, namely micro- and nanosystems.
The Bawendi research group at MIT
The Belcher Group at MIT is using nature as a guide to develop novel electronic and magnetic materials and to pattern materials on the nanoscale.
The Center addresses emerging and compelling gaps in our knowledge of fluid flow and molecular transport in single digit nanopores and establish the scientific foundation for developing transformative molecular separation technologies impacting the Water - Energy Nexus.
ISN's charge is to pursue a long-range vision for how technology can make soldiers less vulnerable to enemy and environmental threats. The ultimate goal is to create a 21st century battlesuit that combines high-tech capabilities with light weight and comfort.
The mission of the Varanasi Group is to bring about transformational efficiency enhancements in various industries including energy (power generation to oil and gas to renewables), water, agriculture, transportation and electronics cooling by fundamentally altering thermal-fluid-surface interactions across multiple length and time scales.
The research in the Laboratory for Multiscale Regenerative Technologies is focused on the applications of micro- and nanotechnology to tissue repair and regeneration. The long-term goals are to improve cellular therapies for liver disease, develop enabling tools to systematically study the fate of stem cells, and design multifunctional nanoparticles for cancer applications.
An experimental group in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering that is studying spin dynamics and spin-electronics in nanoscale magnetic materials and devices. The Beach group's work aims at exploring the fundamental underpinnings of new concepts in spin-based data storage, computation, and communications.
The Sengupta laboratory is focused on developing engineering solutions for complex disease. Our research lies at the interfaces of fundamental biology, medical applications and nano-scale engineering, where basic understanding of biology inspires the development of novel technology or medical applications.
The Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine brings together leading faculty from the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research to focus on grand challenges in cancer detection, treatment, and monitoring that could benefit from the emerging biology and physics of the nanoscale.
The Mechatronics Research Laboratory (MRL) is devoted to the control, system dynamics and design challenges associated with the fields of nanotechnology, biotechnology and robotics. Current research includes control techniques of atomic force microscopes (AFM) to improve imaging, using the AFM to sequence DNA, filtering of nano-scale biomolecules in fluidic suspension, and design of energy-efficient robotics.
The Nanoscale Sensing group applies microfabrication technologies towards the development of novel methods for probing biological systems. Current projects focus on using electrical and mechanical detection schemes for analyzing biomolecules and single cells.
The Micro and Nano Engineering area at MIT's Department of Mechanical Engineering seeks to create new engineering knowledge and products on the micro and nano-scale.
The Microfluidics and Nanofluidics Research Group at MIT is focused on understanding and controlling transport phenomena in fluidic systems at the micro and nano length scales.
The NECST Consortium's technology focus is to improve the performance of advanced aerospace materials/structures through strategic use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) combined with traditional advanced composites to form hybrid architectures. Two primary 3D nano-engineered architectures are being explored and developed, both polymer-matrix based. The fabrication strategy involves novel synthesis of high-quality, long (several millimeters), aligned CNTs placed strategically in existing advanced composite systems. Early results have demonstrated that high-quality CNT/traditional hybrid composite laminates can be architected and fabricated at rates and scales that can be used in full-scale aerospace structures; this made the formation of the NECST industry Consortium imperative.
The Nanoengineering Group is part of the Mechanical Engineering Department at MIT. Their research is focused on nanoscale energy transport, conversion, and storage.
Prof. Jing Kong's group is designing new strategies to make graphene, MoS2, h-BN and other novel 2D materials with desired physical, chemical qualities. The in-depth understanding in how to make those materials is enabling us to develop brand new architectures for high-performance electronics and energy conversion.
A state-of-the-art laboratory in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at MIT for probing the properties and surfaces of engineering and biological materials at atomic and molecular length scales through mechanical contact.
The research group of Prof. Nicholas Fang is dedicated to multidisciplinary fields including nano-optics, photonic/acoustic metamaterials, as well as life sciences. They aim to study the fundamental physics of nano-optics and its application in super-resolution imaging, high-speed/low-cost optical modulation device, high sensitivity biology sensor, etc. High-throughput micro/nano-fabrication techniques are developed to manufactore novel 2D/3D structures. They are the pioneer of acoustic metamaterial study to demonstrate the negative index and super-resolution focusing in ultrasonic wave.
The Nanostructures Laboratory (NSL) at MIT develops techniques for fabricating surface structures with feature sizes in the range from nanometers to micrometers, and uses these structures in a variety of research projects. The NSL is closely coupled to the Space Nanotechnology Laboratory (SNL) with which it shares facilities and a variety of joint programs.
The group of Vladimir Bulovic is developing practical devices/structures from physical insights discovered at the nanoscale.  Their work demonstrates that nanoscale materials such as molecules, polymers, and nanocrystal quantum dots can be assembled into large area functional optoelectronic devices that surpass the performance of today's state-of-the-art.  They combine insights into physical processes within nanostructured devices, with advances in thin film processing of nanostructured material sets, to launch new technologies, and glimpse into the polaron and exciton dynamics that govern the nanoscale.
Research in the Jarillo-Herrero group lies in the area of experimental condensed matter physics, in particular quantum electronic transport in novel low dimensional nanomaterials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes.
Their research is focused on fabrication of devices that exploit the quantum-mechanical properties of materials. Because superconductors provide an ideal medium for studying quantum mechanics in the solid state, they focus on superconductive materials.
A cross-disciplinary research lab at MIT inventing self-assembly and programmable material technologies aimed at reimagining construction, manufacturing, product assembly and performance.
The SNL is the premier laboratory in the world for research in interference lithography and diffraction grating fabrication.
The Strano group at MIT is interested in understanding the chemical and physical interactions that govern our ability to manipulate nanotube and nanoparticle systems, particularly those that are carbon based, for desired applications.
The central goals of the NCI funded MIT-Harvard CCNE are to rapidly translate recent advances in nanotechnology for use in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer, and to develop the next generation of nanomaterials for this purpose.
This inter-departmental Center brings together, MIT researchers and industrial partners to advance the science and engineering of graphene-based technologies. The Center explores advanced technologies and strategies that enable graphene-based materials, devices and systems to provide discriminating or break-through capabilities for a variety of system applications ranging from energy generation and smart fabrics and materials, to RF communications and sensing.
Performs broadly-based research and development in nanotechnology. A unique strength of the group's technical efforts is the focus on systems engineering starting at the molecular scale.
As part of Lippo Medical and Health Program, that includes the Faculty of Medicine Pelita Harapan University, Siloam Hospitals and the Mochtar Riady Comprehensive Cancer Center (MRCCC), the Mochtar Riady Institute for Nanotechnology (MRIN) was established in 2006 to support cancer research in Indonesia using both genomic and proteomic approaches.
A three-year project undertaken by an international consortium of researchers covering 3 continents which could help bring to mass market organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), which could have far reaching technological implications and cut the cost of lighting by billion of pounds each year. The Modecom consortium will work on the molecular level and also look at the workings of the device as a whole.
The focus of MODERN (MOdeling and DEsign of Reliable, process variation-aware Nanoelectronic devices, circuits and systems) is to develop new design tools and methodology for transistors and circuits at the nanoscale which will enable the manufacturing of reliable, low cost, low electromagnetic interference, high-yield complex silicon chips and corresponding products using unreliable and variable devices.
Molecular Frontiers is a global effort to promote the understanding and appreciation of molecular science in society.
The MONA project (Merging Optics and Nanotechnologies) has been launched in June 2005 by the European Commission in order to bridge the gap between photonics and nanotechnologies. The ultimate objective of the project is the development of a European roadmap for photonics and nanotechnologies.
The Monash Centre for Atomically Thin Materials (MCATM) fosters collaboration among existing researchers at the university, bringing them together with those with expertise in atomically thin materials, as well as encouraging partnerships with international partners and industry. It also provides a highly multidisciplinary environment to train early career researchers and students.
The ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology is a national innovator in bio-nano sciences and an incubator of the expertise and technological excellence required to develop next generation bio-responsive nanomaterials.
Research includes Micro/Nano precision manipulation.
Monash University is recognized as one of the leading centres of nanoscience in Australia, with world-class capabilities in nanoscale materials science and engineering and nanobiotechnology.
This facility is dedicated to the growth and characterization of magnetic films, magnetic particles, and magnetic interfaces with the goal of understanding their intrinsic behavior. A technological example of the utility of such films is in non-volatile magnetic random access memories (MRAM), high density archival storage, and magnetic nano-particle based sensors.
Among other areas, the group works on biosensor chips based on graphene, graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes that will improve the analysis of biochemical reactions and accelerate the development of novel drugs.
The objective of the laboratory is the research of quantum phenomenon in semiconductors and hybrid nanostructures. The combination of reduced dimension, topological non-triviality of electron spectrum, strong coupling and possibilities of nanolithography provides these systems with a set of unique physical attributes. Modern experimental methods in electronic measurements, including a technique for measuring quantum fluctuation noise, ultrasensitive radio-frequency and microwave measurements, minute transport measurements in strong magnetic fields and ultralow temperatures are planned to be implemented in the laboratory.
Main lines of research are: Mesoscopic electronic systems; Superconducting hybrid structures; Quantum phase transitions; Spintronics; The two-dimensional electron gas and the quantum Hall effect; Quantum magnetism and systems with "topological order"; Physics of quantum computation.
Nanotechnology at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences
The CARBIO partners apply a multidisciplinary approach to exploit the potential of multi-functional carbon nanotubes (CNT) for biomedical applications, in particular to act as magnetic nano-heaters, drug-carrier systems and sensors which allow a diagnostic and therapeutic usage on a cellular level.
The goal of the MultiPlat project is to develop biomimetic proton conductive membranes with nanometer thickness (nanomembranes) through convergence of the number of fields. The primary application of this multipurpose nanotechnological platform is the next generation of fuel cells where it will replace the prevailing evolutionary modifications of the state of the art solutions.
MULTIPROTECT is an Integrated Project within the thematic priority of 'Nanotechnology and Nanosciences, knowledgebased multifunctional materials and new production processes and devices' of the 6th Framework Programme of the European Commission. The consortium aims to provide a generally applicable, highly innovative, heavy metal free, multifunctional and corrosion preventing surface technology on the basis of smart nanocomposite materials with new nanoparticles as functional design elements.
MAP develops new coherent light sources and secondary light-driven particle sources with unprecedented properties.
Main areas of research are nano-Engineering; nano-Environment; nano-Industrial; bio-nanotechology.
The project MUST aims at providing new technologies based on active multi-level protective systems for future vehicle materials. 'Smart' release nanocontainers will be developed and incorporated in commercial paints, lacquers and adhesive systems to prepare new products exhibiting self-healing properties.
MyFab is a cooperative network of three world-class cleanrooms excelling in micro and nano fabrication. The network offers an extremely wide platform for both academic and commercial interests in Sweden, Europe and around the world.
N2P - Flexible Production Technologies and Equipment based on Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Processing for 3D Nano Structured Surfaces. This project will develop innovative in-line high throughput technologies based on atmospheric pressure surface and plasma technologies. The two identified approaches to direct 3D nanostructuring are etching for manufacturing of nanostructures tailored for specific applications, and coating.
The NADINE project aims at the development of a diagnostic tool able to detect in blood as early as possible, and at a cost compatible with large scale screening, an emerging neurodegenerative disease, and thus aid in the selection the best treatment. The project involves a multidisciplinary consortium of technology developers, three leading biomedical groups in clinical neuroscience for definition of specifications and end-user pre-clinical validation, three research-oriented SMEs in biotechnology, nanosensing and microfluidics and a pharmaceutical company.
Nano devices and bio-MEMS
The department offers programs of study and research in the major areas of biofunctional polymer chemistry, applied organic chemistry, organic process and catalyst chemistry, chemical physics of condensed matters, analytical science, materials design chemistry, and function development technology including nanoparticulate systems.
The lab aims to develop the bases of future nano-electronics. Their main subjects are novel electron devices and optoelectronic devices using carbon nanotubes, high-power and high-frequency GaN transistors, and resonant-tunneling devices and functional circuits.
Namlab, a joint venture of Qimonda Dresden GmbH and the Technical University of Dresden provides industry oriented materials science and research concentrating on new and promising nano-electronic materials for semiconductor applications of tomorrow.
The Namur Nanosafety Center involves several research teams including physicists, chemists, biologists and pharmacists. Each team will fulfil a specific mission in order to obtain an integrated view of nanomaterials physico-chemical properties and interaction with biological systems.
NANEX (Development of Exposure Scenarios for Manufactured Nanomaterials) is a European research program whose aim is to develop a catalogue of generic and specific (occupational, consumer and environmental release) exposure scenarios for MNMs taking account of the entire lifecycle of these materials. NANEX will collect and review available exposure information, focussing on three very relevant MNMs: (1) high aspect ratio nanomaterials- HARNs) (e.g. carbon nanotubes); (2) mass-produced nanomaterials (e.g. ZnO, TiO2, carbon black); and (3) specialised nanomaterials that are currently only produced on a small scale (e.g. Ag). The exposure information will include both quantitative (measurement results) and qualitative contextual exposure information (risk management measures).
A German initiative to promote the entrepreneurial autonomy of young scientists in nanotechnologies.
Nano Grind, a project funded by the European Community under the 'Competitive and Sustainable Growth' Program aims at producing cheap, smooth and curved optical surfaces (in glass, ceramics or hard metal) using an innovative grinding machine tool with electrolytic in-line dressing (ELID). Nano Grind will give a significant machining cost reduction with equal specs on dimensional accuracy and surface quality.
NHECD is a free access, robust and sustainable web based information system including a knowledge repository on the impact of nanoparticles on health, safety and the environment. It includes unstructured data (e.g., scientific papers and other relevant publications). It also includes a mechanism for updating its knowledge repository, thus enabling the creation of a large and developing collection of published data on environmental and health effects following exposure to nanoparticles .
NSTC works to create a platform conducive for the growth, promotion and partnering in the field of Nano Science and Technology taking together industries, academics and government through consultative, advisory and educative processes which will provide growth platform for organizations, academics and governments for harnessing the Nano potential at Global level.
A joint nanotechnology research institute founded by the Technical University Graz and Joanneum Research.
Was established to develop the fundamental technology in the area of nanotechnology, and to play a role in facilitating the industrialization and new industry and securing national competitive edge while gradually/systematically constructing the cooperation system between industry, academy, research institute and government area.
Nano Cluster Bodensee is a nanotechnology interest group in the economic area around Lake Constance.
The UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) in collaboration with leading design houses, chip manufacturers and ECAD vendors has given funding of GBP5.3M ($9.1M) to apply e-Science and Grid technology to tackle some of the fundamental challenges facing nano-CMOS design.
The NANO-D team develops algorithms for modeling and simulating nanosystems. In particular, NANO-D develops SAMSON, a software platform for computational nanoscience.
The Norwegian PhD Network on Nanotechnology for Microsystems has been established to coordinate, integrate, and strengthen PhD programmes in the field of nanotechnology and microsystems in Norway. Drawing on the strengths of the participating institutions, the objective is to facilitate an expansion in scope and depth of the research training in this field nationwide.
NATAL is a specific targeted research project (STREP) supported by the European Commission under the Sixth Framework Program. The project is coordinated by the Optoelectronics research Centre. The project aims to develop compact light sources for the visible and UV wavelengths with applications in a broad range of fields including nano/micro materials processing, medicine, RGB full-color displays and UV lithography.
The focus is on basic research in the three areas of metal-, semiconductor-, and molecular/atomic-based spintronics with the visionary goal of developing nanoscale spintronic devices based on a detailed knowledge of the underlying atomistic spin-dependent interactions and processes.
Nano-Tera is a Swiss federal program funding scientific projects. The Nano-Tera initiative aims to bring Switzerland to the forefront of a new technological revolution, using engineering and information technology to improve the health and security of humans and the environment in the 21st century.
Ever been curious about how a real science project operates? What it's like working in a research lab? What happens when unexpected things happen? Ever wanted to get involved in cutting-edge nanotechnology research, meet the scientists, and be there when the latest discoveries are made? With nano2hybrids, for the first time this is possible... the key scientists involved in this European research project will be making video diaries and posting them on this web site, along with blogs of their work and lives.
The objective of this EU FP6 project is to develop an innovative specialised protein-based drug-delivery system engineered to allow the intracellular tracking of both the device and the coupled drug.
A career network for young female scientists involved in the fields of nanotechnologies.
Nano @ Penn State has been created as a portal to access the breadth of nanotechnology research at the University.
The project's goal is to develop advanced nanocomposites materials used in civil constructions with antibacterial, selfcleaning properties and solar energy concentrators integrated structures for ambiental improvement.
This project uses econometric methods to estimate the impact of nanoscale science and technology (nano S&T) research, and associated interdisciplinary research, directly on firms' entry and success and hence on U.S. economic growth, standard of living, and competitiveness.
NanoBio-RAISE combines ethics research in nanobiotechnology with science communication. This interdisciplinary project brings together nanobiotechnologists, ethicists and communication specialists with the aims to anticipate the societal and ethical issues likely to arise as nanobiotechnologies develop and to use the lessons from the GM debate to respond to the probable public concerns. NanoBio-RAISE is a 6th Framework Programme project.
The main objective of the project is to establish the scientific and technological basis for the development new intelligent composite scaffold for bone tissue repair and regeneration with bioactive behavior capable of activating osteoprogenitor cells and genes and within an in vivo environment provide the interface to respond to physiological and biological changes, with mechanical and structural properties similar to a healthy bone and with size and shape required for reconstructing big skeletal defects.
The Nanobioengineering Research Laboratory, a collaboration between the Universitat de Barcelona (UB) and the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC), is a multidisciplinary centre belonging to the Catalan Bioengineering Institute (IBEC) in which joint research on the applications of nanotecnology to biology and biomedicine is carried out.
The project aims to support SMEs, their suppliers, service suppliers and research institutes in their decision making when developing and producing polymeric nanobiomaterials for drug delivery by implementing a Safe-by-Design (SbD) approach. Moreover, the regulatory framework for the topic at hand and safety aspects during the product's life-cycle are included.
A group of conceiving inventing and utilizing optical microscopes with resolution at the nanometer scale to advance life sciences.
The Case Western reserve University nanoBook is an interactive directory that highlights the ongoing nanoscience/nanotechnolgy research activities of our faculty across the university. Please browse through the nanoBook by faculty last name, department, or by choosing a field of interest.
The NANOCAGE project brings together a number of leading European nanoscience groups on a research problem which involves not only a novel materials system but a variety of cutting edge spectroscopic techniques. Interpretation of the spectroscopic measurements will in turn be facilitated by the application of a number of powerful theoretical methods. This combination of interdisciplinary research, challenging experimental techniques, an exotic materials system, and comprehensive theoretical work provides an exceptionally strong PhD training programme in nanoscience.
NanoCap is a European project that is set up to deepen the understanding of environmental, occupational health and safety risks and ethical aspects of nanotechnology. Therefore a structured discussion is organised between environmental NGOs, trade unions, academic researchers and other stakeholders. NanoCap is the acronym for 'Nanotechnology Capacity Building NGOs'. This project will enable environmental NGOs and trade unions to participate in a debate on nanotechnology at European level.
The project NANOCAPS will develop new technologies based on micro-encapsulation to solve industrial problems related to controlled release of chemicals.
(Site in German) NanoCare is a joint project of German industry, universities and research institutes to gain scientific knowledge about potential health risks of engineered nanoparticles.
A EU-funded project for the development of very high performance bio-derived composite materials of cellulose nanofibres and polysaccharides.
The EU FP7 NanoCharM project (Multifunctional NanoMaterials Characterization exploiting Ellipsometry and Polarimetry) will promote and develop the use of non-destructive characterization of nanomaterials using polarimetry and ellipsometry techniques.
The intellectual merit of this NSF-funded program is based on the creation of new knowledge in four areas: (a) the synthesis and extension of existing knowledge about ethical issues in nanotechnology research and applications; (b) the synthesis and extension of existing knowledge about environmental, health, safety, and security impacts of nanotechnology; (c) documentation of the levels and changes over time of the geographic distribution within the US and among countries of nanotechnology-related patents; and (d) development and validation of the empirical relevance for policy, research, and public information of NanoIndicators.
NanoCore is a Singapore-based interdisciplinary research collaboration in the science and technology of the nano-scale. NanoCore is funded and housed by the National University of Singapore.
This European project's goal is to establish new methodologies (high-resolution ion microscopy, radiotracer) on skin cross sections to study the quality of skin as a barrier against formulations containing nanoparticles.
The main objective of this FP7 project is a development and validation of technologies for the detection and analysis of single nanoparticles in complex environments. The project is based on the new experimental phenomenon discovered recently by one of the project partners: single sub-wavelength objects give rise to optical signals in surface plasmon resonance microscopy.
The main project goal is to develop innovative concepts and reliable methods for characterizing engineered nanoparticles in workplace air with novel, portable and easy-to-use devices suitable for workplaces.
Development of Novel Nanotechnology Based Diagnostic Systems for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Osteoarthritis (NanoDiaRA). The main objective of this large-scale integrating project is the development of modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles as a diagnostic tool for the detection of early stages of arthritis. In addition to research, the project will consider the social, ethical and legal aspects of applying nanotechnology for medical purposes.
The European FP7 project NanoDiode, launched in July 2013 for a period of three years, establishes an innovative, coordinated programme for outreach and dialogue throughout Europe so as to support the effective governance of nanotechnologies. The project integrates vital engagement activities along the innovation value chain, at the levels of research policy, research and development, and the use of nanotechnological innovations throughout society.
The Nanoethics Group is a non-partisan and independent organization that studies the ethical and societal implications of nanotechnology.
The NanoEthicsBank is a database conceived as a resource for researchers, scholars, students, and the general public who are interested in the social and ethical implications of nanotechnology. Items in the database include normative documents, such as guidelines for safety in the workplace, and descriptive materials, such as analysis of the U.S. government's capacity for oversight and studies of the media coverage of nanotechnology.
The precursor to the Nanofactory Collaboration was informally initiated by Robert Freitas and Ralph Merkle in the Fall of 2000 during their time at Zyvex. Their continuing efforts, and those of others, have now grown into direct collaborations among 23 researchers or other participants (including 16 Ph.D's or Ph.D candidates) at 10 institutions in 4 countries (U.S., U.K., Russia, and Belgium), as of 2006.
The EU-funded NANOFLOC (Electro-agglomeration and separation of Engineered NanoParticles from process and waste water in the coating industry to minimize health and environmental risks) project was established to address the concerns over the health effects of breathable nanoparticles, which can be found in a number of end products such as paints.
NanoGagliato is an international nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing global health, the field of nanomedicine, and community engagement in the nanosciences.
NANOGLOWA brings together universities, power plant operators, industry and SMEs. 26 organisations from 14 countries throughout Europe join the NANOGLOWA-consortium in order to develop optimal nanostructured membranes and installations for CO2 capture from powerplants. NANOGLOWA is funded by the European Commission under the 6th Framework Programme.
Nanogrowth is an international project, funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council EPSRC, to investigate crystal growth mechanisms in nanoporous materials, such as zeolites. The project started in October 2006 and runs for three years. The project team consists of members from universities in the United Kingdom, Sweden and France together with our industrial sponsor in the USA.
Nanogune's mission is to address basic and applied research in nanoscience and nanotechnology, fostering high-standard training and education of researchers in this field, and promoting the cooperation among the different agents in the Basque Science, Technology, and Innovation Network (Universities and Technological Centers) and between these agents and the industrial sector.
The NanoHand project aims at developing a system consisting of micro/nano based subsystems for automatic handling of nanometer sized objects.
This multi-disciplinary research program develops novel material solutions for use in advanced wound healing based on nanofibrillated cellulose structures.
The world's largest collaborative project for the research and development of nanofluid coolants, NanoHex comprises of a consortium of 12 leading European companies and research centres.
The nine partners involved in the EU-funded (FP7) NanoHouse project are generating missing data on the potential exposure levels and the hazard due to this chronic exposure for 2 nanoparticle types: nano silver and nano titanium dioxide contained in indoor and outdoor coatings and paints. Both direct and indirect exposures (through the environment to human: vegetables, drinking water) are considered.
The nanoICT Coordination Action activities reinforces and supports the whole European Research Community in 'ICT nanoscale devices' covering the following research areas expected to demonstrate unconventional solutions beyond the expected limits of CMOS technology.
NanoImpactNet is a multidisciplinary European network on the health and environmental impact of nanomaterials. NanoImpactNet will create a scientific basis to ensure the safe and responsible development of engineered nanoparticles and nanotechnology-based materials and products, and will support the definition of regulatory measures and implementation of legislation in Europe.
NanoInteract is a Specific Targeted Reseach Program (STReP) funded by the European Commission Research Directorate. The full title of this project is 'Development of a platform and toolkit for understanding interactions between nanoparticles and the living world'. The NanoInteract consortium consists of 8 academic partners in Europe, 1 US academic partner, 2 European reserach centres, and 6 industry partners representating the industry base where Nanotechnology will be important in the coming decades.
Europe-wide dialogue on benefits, risks and social, ethical and legal implications of nanotechnologies. The project has ended in early 2007.
The NanoMan project is an EU-funded research project to develop new technologies for handling and control of single molecules and nanostructures on the sub 10nm scale. The ultimate aim of the project is to develop techniques and protocols, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), that enable manipulation of sub 10nm structures on insulating surfaces.
Within NanoMat three research centers of the Hermann von Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren, ten universities with natural and engineering science departments, one Max Planck Institute, an Institute of the Wissenschaftsgemeinschaft Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, three Fraunhofer Institutes, an Institute of the Polish Academy of Science, the DECHEMA and four major companies coordinate their research programmes. The theme of the research is 'Synthesis and investigation of nanostructured metals and ceramics, and investigation of the materials and applications which result from their nanoscale nature.'
This network is funded by the French program on nanosciences.
The aim of this Research Council of Norway initiative within nanotechnology and materials technology is to enforce basic knowledge in order to pave the way for new knowledge-based and research-intensive industry, and provide a sustainable revitalisation of established Norwegian industry.
A French site (in French) on nanomaterials and risks, maintained by the Ecrin Association, a nonprofit organization that is the offspring of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the Commissariat à l'�nergie Atomique (CEA). The letters E.C.R.I.N. stand for 'Exchange and Collaboration Research-Industry'.
An interdisciplinary and intersectorial, FP6-funded research and training network in the emerging field of nanoscience and -technology. The project aims at the development of tailored photo- and electro-responsive organic/ inorganic hybrid systems such as photovoltaic cells, LEDs, and electro-optic modulators, by combining the advantages of organic and inorganic materials.
The Nanomed Round Table is a 'Coordination and support action' in the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) Nanosciences. The Nanomed Round Table's main purpose is to provide to European stakeholders a set of recommendations to support decision making regarding nanomedical innovations.
A cooperative effort of 8 institutions, the nanomedicine development center focuses on a model nucleoprotein machine that carries out non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) of DNA double strand breaks. This machine has a simple structure and significant clinical relevance.
The main objectives of the NanoMesh project are to understand the self-assembly processes leading to this highly interesting and non-trivial nanostructure, to find routes for controlling the mesh parameters and for mass production, and to demonstrate its prospects for future applications as a oxygen- and carbon-free template for the production of nanocatalysts, nanomagnets and for functionalized surfaces.
This European FP7 project aims to establish a panel of read-out systems for the prediction of the toxic potential of existing and emerging engineered nanomaterials.
The main goal of the project consists in establishing an accredited laboratory for nanometric scale morphological characterization and analyses of material surfaces. The laboratory would have the capability to provide characterization services for research and/or production of materials whose surfaces have a nanometric scale structure, ex: optical surfaces (in optical components), biocompatible metals and ceramics, materials for semiconductor industry, coating and protection films etc.
The goal of the Nanomotor Drug Delivery Center is to construct a synthetic modified motor with artificial components for use in a variety of nanodevices and nanomedical applications. The center is to create liposomes and nano-structured arrays with embedded and active modified phi29 DNA-packaging motors for both passive and active transport of DNA and drugs.
NanoNet Ireland is a voluntary network representing all the key stakeholders in developing nanoscience and nanotechnology in Ireland ? government, academia and industry.
NanoNextNL is a consortium of more than one hundred companies, universities, knowledge institutes and university medical centres, which is aimed at research into micro and nanotechnology. The total sum involved for NanoNextNL is 250 million euros, half of which is contributed by the collaboration of more than one hundred businesses, universities, knowledge institutes and university medical centres and the other half by the ministry of Economic affairs, Agriculture and Innovation.
The NANOPAGE project focuses on the development of a flexible large area display made by assembly of microCRTs into a polymer canvas. Those microCRTs are millimetre size cold-emission cathode ray tubes, used as elementary color dots, 3 microCRTs, red, green and blue, making a complete pixel. Those microCRTs use nanometer scale Carbon Nanotubes as cold electron sources.
An EC financed project to examine the role of micro and nanoparticles in inducing pathologies.
The Research center NanoQAM is a grouping of five laboratories in nanotechnologies of the Université du Québec à Montréal which offer their knowledge and expertise in nanomanufacturing using polymers, development of high-energy nanomaterials, renewable energies, nanoimaging, green chemistry as well as the development of biological membranes, biomaterials and biosensors. NanoQAM allows access to its infrastructures and scientific equipment, either for industries and other academic institutions.
NanoQuebec, a not-for-profit corporation jointly funded by the governments of Quebec and of Canada plays a central role in the structuring and planning efforts in nanotechnology in Quebec.
Nanoscale Quantum Simulations for Nanostructures and Advanced Materials. Nanoquanta is a Network of Excellence performing fundamental Physics research funded by the European Commission's Sixth Framework Programme.
The objectives of the Nanorac project are to develop efficient instrumentation for measurement, analysis and manufacture at the nano-scale.
NANoREG is the first FP7 project to deliver the answers needed by regulators and legislators on EHS by linking them to a scientific evaluation of data and test methods. Based on questions and requirements supplied by regulators and legislators, NANoREG will: (i) provide answers and solutions from existing data, complemented with new knowledge, (ii) Provide a tool box of relevant instruments for risk assessment, characterisation, toxicity testing and exposure measurements of Manufactured Nano Materials, (iii) develop, for the long term, new testing strategies adapted to innovation requirements, (iv) Establish a close collaboration among authorities, industry and science leading to efficient and practically applicable risk management approaches for Manufactured Nano Materials and products containing Manufactured Nano Materials.
A European FP6 program to develop a Nanomaterial Roadmap 2015: Industrial Adaption to Small and Medium Sized Enterprises; Trends in Research and Development; and Product and Application Visions.
The main research focus of the Laboratory is to pioneer in the development of new instrumented platforms and techniques through nanorobotics by exploiting the unique properties of molecular scale entities. The main areas of applications are in medicine and bioengineering, including supporting new robotic platforms for nanomanufacturing or high-throughput automatic operations at the nanoscale.
Many new nanotechnology research fields require a high degree of precision in both observing and manipulating materials at the atomic level. The advanced nanorobotics technology needed to manipulate materials at the nanoscale is being developed in the new Sheffield NANOLAB.
The main objective of NANOS4 - Nano-structured solid-state gas sensors with superior performance - is a breakthrough in advanced micro and nano technologies for developing innovative metal-oxide gas sensing systems.
An initiative under the EU's 6th Framework Program: The overall aim of NANOSAFE2 is to develop risk assessment and management for secure industrial production of nanoparticles.
The EU NanoSafety Cluster is a DG RTD NMP initiative to maximise the synergies between the existing FP6 and FP7 projects addressing all aspects of nanosafety including toxicology, ecotoxicology, exposure assessment, mechanisms of interaction, risk assessment and standardisation. Participation in the NanoSafety cluster is voluntary for projects that commenced prior to April 2009, and is compulsory for nano-EHS projects started since April 2009.
NISE brings researchers and informal science educators together to inform the public about nanoscience and technology.
The NanoSci-ERA Consortium is a network of public or private bodies responsible for financing or managing research programmes in nanoscience that are established in countries belonging to the European Research Area (ERA).
A Design Study for a European Research Infrastructure enabling access to nanoscience, atomic precision and fine analysis with a unified metrology.
(Site in French only) French nanoscience competence center for the Grand-Est region.
(Site in French only) French nanoscience competence center for the Ile de France region.
NanoSelect aims to design, develop and optimize novel bio-based foams/filters/membranes/adsorbent materials with high and specific selectivity using nanocellulose/nanochitin and combinations thereof for decentralized industrial and domestic water treatment. NanoSelect proposes a novel water purification approach combining the physical filtration process and the adsorption process exploring the capability of the nanocellulose and/or nanochitin (with or without functionalization) to selectively adsorb, store and desorb contaminants from industrial water and drinking water while passing through a highly porous or permeable membrane.
A nonprofit scientific research and education foundation chartered to conceive, establish, and conduct cutting-edge technology, research, and development in the areas of aerospace, education, energy, life sciences, shipping and transportation.
In order to ensure that Spanish industry and R&D facilities play a key role in this field, the NanoSpain Network scheme aims to promote Spanish science and research through a multi-national networking action and to stimulate commercial Nanotechnology applications.
NANOSPIN is a Europeen commision projected bringing together 8 academic and industrial partners with a strong background in spintronic materials and devices, and comming from 6 Europeen member countries. The project aims at the development of novel multifunctional spintronic nanoscale devices whose mode of operation is designed to take optimum advantage of the specific magneto electric properties of ferromagnetic semiconductors.
The main objective of the NANOSTAR (Nano-Structured Ferrolectric Films for Tuneable Acoustic Resonators and Devices) project, supported by European Commission, is development of nanostructured ferroelectric films for microwave applications.
Nanostrand's overall goal is to roadmap future European standardisation activities for nanotechnology which relate to pre-normative research work in order to support European organisations to play an active role in worldwide development of nanotechnology standards.
This FP7-funded project has the objective of developing innovative solutions for the sustainable design, use, recycling, and final treatment of nanotechnology-based products.
The aim of this European research project is to investigate electrical transport in (single) elaborate molecular systems, which are interfaced to the macroscopic world by electric leads.
In the cluster of excellence Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), scientists from various research facilities in the Munich area in the fields of physics, biophysics, physical chemistry, biochemistry, pharmaceuticals, biology, electronics and medicine work together with the goal of designing, producing and controlling a series of artificial and multifunctional nanosystems.
Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology at Prince of Songkla University was established in 2006 under the collaboration among researcher from three faculties; Sciences, Pharmacy and Engineering. The Center's main focus is on nanomaterials.
Nanotec IT (the Italian Centre for Nanotechnology) is an autonomous branch of AIRI (Italian Association for Industrial Research) whose primary objective is to become the national focal point for nanotechnology and contribute to make more effective the activities going on in the Country in this field so that these efforts could translate into a competitive advantage for the national industry.
Nanotech NYC is a website aimed at fostering the growth and advancement of the nanotechnology and nanoscience communities in the greater New York City area. The site is populated with a host of information, including listings of researchers, companies, facilities, resources, programs and events.
The Nanotech Regulatory Document Archive is a free, searchable database of governmental documents from around the world relating to nanotechnology regulation.
(Site in German) A competence center that combines research institutions and industrial companies in the area of ultra-precision surface processing.
(In German) Im Verbraucherportal des Ministeriums für Ländlichen Raum und Verbraucherschutz Baden-Württemberg finden Interessierte Informationen zu Verbraucheraspekten im Umgang mit Nanotechnologien.
The purpose of this Japanese initiative is business matching, exchange of new technical information, sharing of information between entrepreneurs, researchers and investors, interaction between researchers and engineers, proposing R&D strategies to government, supporting ventures, and planning activities relating to standardization and increasing awareness.
This German center of competence is coordinated by Fraunhofer-Institute IWS Dresden. It joins 51 enterprises, 10 university institutes, 22 research institutes, and 5 corporations into a common network.
The NIA promotes the responsible use of nanotechnology and raises awareness of its many applications among key audiences in the UK.
The Nanotechnology KTN has been established to provide a market-oriented focus for the facilities, people and organisations engaged in Micro and Nanotechnologies in the UK and to lower entry barriers and drive the widespread market development and exploitation of these technologies.
The American Chemistry Council's Nanotechnology Panel is composed of companies engaged in the production, distribution, and/or use of chemicals with business interests in the products and applications of nanotechnology. The Panel is actively involved in advocating the use of information and the completion of research on nanomaterials that facilitate understanding and manage the health and environmental issues associated with nanoscale materials.
JILA is an institute for interdisciplinary research and graduate education in the physical sciences, operated jointly by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado at Boulder, and involving NIST Quantum Physics Division 848 researchers. These NIST scientists participate in a variety of nanotechnology activities, several of which are summarized here
(site in Spanish) Nanoscience and nanotechnology in the Catalonia area of Spain.
NanoTEST is a collaborative research project which is funded under the EU Seventh Framework Programme for Health 2007. The project brings together a team of lead scientists in Europe, and the overall aim is to develop alternative testing strategies and high-throughput toxicity testing protocols using in vitro and in silico methods essential for the risk assessment of nanoparticles used in medical diagnostics.
An ITA (Institute of Technology Assessment) Project - Integrative Analysis of the State of Knowledge Regarding Health and Environmental Risks of Nanotechnology. The heart of the research project is to continually survey, analyse and summarise the state of knowledge regarding potential health and environmental risks of nanotechnology.
As a EU FP7 "flagship" project, NanoValid has mobilized the necessary expertise and resources to adequately respond to the growing production and use of engineered nanomaterials in a multitude of technical applications and consumer products. The project will in particular address the question, if and how these new materials will increase exposure on humans and ecosystems.
The general objective of the NanoWal network is to connect academic & industrial actors active in the nanotech field in Wallonia.
The main objective of this proposal is related to the creation of nano-electronic devices based on new materials with advanced functionalities, corresponding to the next generation of devices under research and development by the electronic industry.
The European FP7-financed Nanoyou will engage with more than 25,000 students and 4,000 young adults about nanotechnologies through programs in schools, science centres and museums around Europe, and with a much wider audience through this portal.
The centerhas r?epositioned itself to meet the new challenges in minimization and multifunctionality of micro/nanoelectronic devices. In NOVITAS, they strategize their research to tackle these challenges through three research progammes: (1) Advanced Silicon Devices and Integration Technologies, (2) Compound Semiconductor Devices and ICs and (3) Nanotechnologies.
The research group of nanotechnology emphasizes its research on fuel cell technology, applied catalysis and reaction engineering, functionalized polymeric materials and nanocomposite materials for biosensors and pharmaceutical applications. The state-of-the-art analytical and characterization facilities available in the School provide support for cutting-edge research.
NAREGI is carrying out R&D from two directions: through the grid middleware R&D at the National Institute of Informatics (NII), and through applied experimental study using nano-applications, at the Institute for Molecular Science (IMS).
The research work focuses on experimental research and development in nano and bio technologies as well as on a strong complementary modeling and simulation effort that includes computational nanotechnology, computational nanoelectronics, computational optoelectronics, and computational modeling of processes encountered in nanofabrication.
The NSF Nanosystems Engineering Research Center (NERC) for Nanomanufacturing Systems for Mobile Computing and Mobile Energy Technologies (NASCENT) will develop high throughput, high yield and versatile nanomanufacturing systems to take nano-science discoveries from the lab to the marketplace. The Center is led by The University of Texas at Austin and includes two partner institutions - University of California at Berkeley and University of New Mexico. Also included are Seoul National University in South Korea and Indian Institute of Science.
NAST is a multidisciplinary research and training centre designed to promote research programs among engineers, materials and medical scientists at the farefront of Italian (bio-) nanotechnology.
The NCL serves as a national resource and knowledge base for all cancer researchers to facilitate the regulatory review of nanotechnologies intended for cancer therapies and diagnostics.
The NCI Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer is a comprehensive, systematized initiative encompassing the public and private sectors, designed to accelerate the application of the best capabilities of nanotechnology to cancer.
The center is based at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Partner institutions include Yale University, University of Southern California, University of Chicago, Illinois Institute of Technology, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Oxford University, Wabash College, University of California, Davis, nanoHUB at Purdue University, and the University of New Mexico.
NCLT is the first national center for learning and teaching of nanoscale science and engineering education in the US. The mission of NCLT is to develop the next generation of leaders in NSE teaching and learning, with an emphasis on NSEE capacity building, providing a strong impact on national STEM education.
This interdisciplinary center has been striving to become an internationally recognized hub for paradigm-shifting research, innovation, and education in the domain of 'smart' materials whose function and design are inspired by nature. Transcending traditional disciplines, the center integrates the research activities of 15 research groups from the University of Fribourg?s Adolphe Merkle Institute, its departments of chemistry, medicine, and physics, and partners at the University of Geneva and the Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ) and Lausanne (EPFL).
The research focus of the Center is on design, modelling and synthesis of nanomaterials with specific properties and various possible applications. Initial focus is on carbon nanotubes, silicon nanoparticles and nanolayer deposition techniques.
A highly interdisciplinary programme for investigating the synthesis, assembly, properties and commercial application of nanomaterials.
The three objectives for the center are 1) to promote and coordinate large-scale interdisciplinary research programs in nano-science and technology. 2) to plan and to co-ordinate cross-disciplinary undergraduate and postgraduate training in nano-science and technology. 3) to serve as a bridge between the university's nano-research and the industrial application in nanotechnology.
The main objective of this center is to educate hi-tech professionals demanded both in academic and industrial fields, which will consequently promote academic research in electronics and forward the development of IC industry.
The research projects in the Nano-Energy Lab comprise enhancing thermal energy transport, storage and conversion efficiency using nanostructures.
The center aims to integrate all teaching resources to promote comprehensive nanotechnology-based education in eastern Taiwan. In order to improving the public understanding of science in nanotechnology in eastern Taiwan, they also have projects about public science education.
Conducts research on nanomaterials.
The NEST-INFM initiative targets the creation of a world-class research centre where interdisciplinary teams of computational, experimental, and theoretical physicists together with molecular biologists and chemists can investigate key issues of nanoscale physics and exploit the new acquired knowledge to develop innovative nanobiotechnological tools, and nanoelectronic and photonic devices and architectures.
(Site in Spanish) INTI gathers more than 30 Technological Industrial Center in several fields, among them nanotechnologies.
The group focuses on the design and fabrication of functional structures, characterization of properties, and development for industrial and energy applications of low-dimensional nanomaterials including graphene, carbon nanotubes, boride, carbide, and oxide nanowires.
Research towards the realization of a functional nano-electronic system.
The Quantum Dot Research Center is promoting research on these semiconductor nano structures and aiming at further development of basic nano technologies by advancing and fusing nano fabrication technologies which NIMS has been cultivating.
The advanced characterization and measurement technologies responding to the material needs are indispensable for the innovation. The group is aiming at is state-of-the-art analytical technologies to clarify the comprehensive characteristics of materials.
The Quantum Dot Research Center is promoting research on these semiconductor nano structures and aiming at further development of basic nano technologies by advancing and fusing nano fabrication technologies which NIMS has been cultivating.
The National Institute for Nanotechnology is an integrated, multi-disciplinary institution involving researchers in physics, chemistry, engineering, biology, informatics, pharmacy and medicine. Established in 2001, it is operated as a partnership between the National Research Council and the University of Alberta, and is jointly funded by the Government of Canada, the Government of Alberta and the university.
NIOSH is the leading U.S. federal agency conducting research and providing guidance on the occupational safety and health implications and applications of nanotechnology.
Offers an M. Tech. course in Nanotechnology.
NIH participates in the National Nanotechnology Initiative and this page contains information on (1) currently active NIH and BECON research and training opportunities and (2) listings of funded grants for NIH and BECON program announcements related to nanotechnology and nanoscience.
LOMIN specializes in synthesizing molecular imaging probes for positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), optical (bioluminescence, fluorescence and Raman), contrast enhanced ultrasound, photoacoustic imaging, as well as multimodality imaging. This research group aims to develop a molecular imaging toolbox for better understanding of biology, early diagnosis of disease, monitoring therapy response, and guiding drug discovery/development.
NDL has been playing a significant role in support of universities in Taiwan for research and development in advance semiconductor process technologies, and educating and training high-tech people for the microelectronics industries.
The National Nanomanufacturing Network is an open network for collaboration and information exchange among the nanomanufacturing research, development and education community.
Nanotec's missions are to establish, support and promote the nanotechnological development of the country through research innovations, technology transfer, human resource development, and infrastructure.
The NNIN is an integrated networked partnership of user facilities, supported by the  National Science Foundation, serving the needs of nanoscale science,  engineering and technology. The mission of National NNIN is to enable rapid advancements in science, engineering and technology at the nano-scale by efficient access to nanotechnology infrastructure by providing shared open, geographically diverse laboratories
This is a good source of basic nanotech information.  Following links from the homepage, one finds a listing of NNI centers and funding opportunities for academics and startups
A center of excellence in nanoscience and nanotechnology in Turkey.
NPL is involved with various activities and research at the Nano scale.
The Carbon Nanoscience Group seeks to understand the chemical, physical, and optoelectronic properties of a variety of nanosystems and nanomaterials. The end goal is to develop and apply design principles to fabricate new molecules and materials for application in several important renewable energy technologies.
NREL's specialists in chemical science and nanoscience are helping to provide the nation with clean sources of energy by studying and developing novel and efficient ways to convert the energy in sunlight into chemical energy (such as hydrogen) and light-generated electricity. Their research focuses on the basic, fundamental science that underpins many aspects of renewable energy.
This program will coordinate theresearch efforts from various government organizations to achieve objectives that follow the worldwide nanotechnology development trends.
(website in Chinese only)
(website in Chinese only)
NTU was created to be a center for conducting Nano science and technology studies.
The group of Prof. Chen focuses on these areas: Nanofabrications and nano-scale lithography; Optoelectronic devices with nanostructures; Optical Thin Films; Nano-scale semiconductor processing technologies; Optoelectronic materials and nanomaterials; Antireflective coating technologies
The Centre's research is focused on innovative therapeutic solutions to current medical challenges and deals with various nanoscale applications and materials.
Metal nanomaterials of different sizes, shapes, and structures are finding increasing acceptance in biological applications. Metal nanomaterials can be interfaced with biological materials to form a new class of designer organic-inorganic hybrids (BioNanoMetals) which can be used to enable the green synthesis of metal nanomaterials and the safe use of nanometals in biomedical applications. The group is interested in investigating the basic design principles for functional BioNanoMetals and addressing fundamental issues on the interactions between the biological systems and metal nanomaterials.
Founded by faculty from Biological Sciences, Chemistry, and Physics, the Centre for BioImaging Sciences's (CBIS) research is focused on the science and application of biological imaging by light and electron microscopy and the development of computational and microscopy-based methods and technologies.
In 2014, the National Research Foundation (NRF) of Singapore has awarded NUS with a S$ 50 M grant over the next 10 years in order to support the operational costs of GRC's labs and micro and nano-fabrication facility and the exploration, synthesis, and development of new devices based on two-dimensional (2D) materials of which graphene is the most famous, creating a new Centre for Advanced 2D Materials, directed by Prof. Antonio H. Castro Neto.
Established in 2010 within the National University of Singapore, the Graphene Research Centre (GRC) was created for the conception, characterization, theoretical modeling, and development of transformative technologies based on two-dimensional crystals, such as graphene.
Their mission is to investigate the natural structure-property-function relationship of cells and molecules so as to further understand the physiological functions and establish possible connections to human diseases.
Dedicated to improving and inventing innovative processes based on electrospinning and exploring new applications for the electrospun nanofibers.
The group is particularly interested in discovering novel nanobiology of nanomaterials. Some of this nanobiology is detrimental to the organism's well being and some is beneficial. The differentiation of either conclusion depends heavily on our understanding of how nanomaterials interact with biological systems. The group approaches their work from an observation initiated and hypothesis driven manner. From these findings, they aim to develop nanoparticle specific rules that drive certain cell effect. Understanding these rules helps to design better nanoparticles.
The initiative's approach to the development and promotion of nanotechnology research is to optimise resources in creating strategic high impact research while retaining diversity in research areas.
Graphene is a new age multifunctional material. As chemists, we are engaged in the growth, processing, derivatizing of graphene to make dna sensors, hybrids for solar cells, membrane for water purification. We hope to improve the quality of human life by researching on graphene, which we believe to be a fundamental building block for many useful devices.
The aim of the ESF program 'Nanotribology (NATRIBO)' is to improve the collaborations between experimentalists and theoreticians in the field of tribology on the nanometer scale.
The Environmental Nanoscience Initiative was set up by NERC, Defra and the Environment Agency in the UK to begin to answer some questions of basic nanosciences research; into fate and behavior, ecotoxicology and ecological effects of engineering nanoparticles.
NRL established an Institute for Nanoscience to conduct multidisciplinary research at the intersections of the fields of materials, electronics and biology
Maintained by the North Carolina Board of Science and Technology this site serves as an information clearinghouse about nanotechnology in North Carolina.
Located at North Dakota State University, Fargo, the NDSU Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering provides research and development with world-class facilities, equipment and staff with broad-based expertise.
Maintains a nanoelectronics research lab.
The Research and Training Network NESPA will focus on the research topic of the development of high temperature superconductor (HTS) materials for power applications.
The Network for Computational Nanotechnology (7 universities) has a mission to connect theory, experiment, and computation in a way that makes a difference to the future of nanotechnology. While addressing challenges in nanotechnology NCN researchers produce new algorithms, approaches, and software tools with capabilities not yet available commercially.
The main objective of the project, which ran from 08/2004 until 07/2006, was to mobilize human and material resources in the field of nanostructured materials in New Member States of the EU, to consolidate, strengthen, and enhance the dispersed research/technological potential in this field of research, to promote and use the results of 5th FP and 6th FP, and to improve the knowledge based application oriented nanoscience and nanotechnology in Europe.
The NEURONANO network major aim is to integrate carbon nanotubes (CNT) with multielectrode array (MEA) technology to develop a new generation biochips to help repair damaged central nervous system (CNS) tissues.
NJIT is renowned for expertise in architecture, applied mathematics, wireless communications and networking, solar physics, advanced engineered particulate materials, nanotechnology, neural engineering and e-learning.
The research in Prof. Dong Ko's group focuses on how we can utilize nanocrystals for direct conversion into electricity of two of the most important ubiquitous sources of free energy: sunlight and waste heat.
The New Mexico EPSCoR program is a statewide collaborative partnership of colleges and universities, national laboratories, industry, and state government united in an effort to promote research, increase opportunities for training the workforce of scientists and engineers and, ultimately, to promote the economic development of the state of New Mexico. The goal of the NM EPSCoR program is to increase the competitiveness of NM researchers within targeted science and technology fields through sustainable infrastructure improvements.
NanoPhysics researchers of New Mexico State University study optical, thermal, conductive and photoelectric properties of Nano-materials for Nanotechnological applications in nano devices.
Nanoscience and materials at NYU includes fullerene derivatization studies, chiral sensors and triggered materials, peptide nanotechnology; peptide surface interactions, molecular imaging agents, and proteins containing unnatural amino acids.
The project focuses on the research and development of a new bioactive non-resorbable fibre-reinforced composite (FRC) material for load-bearing bone and joint implants in skeletal reconstruction of orthopaedic and trauma patients. A special emphasis will be placed on the development of bioactive and antibacterial surface treatments of the implants. Another objective is to produce novel composite-based bioactive resorbable fixation devices for ligament repairs of the knee and shoulder.
The ETM group focuses on unique strengths and capabilities to conduct world leading research, benefiting from synergies between: microelectronics; materials research and design to simulate nanostructures and technology processes and devices; fabrication in two in-house class 100-1000 clean rooms; characterisation of materials, devices and circuits; research on emerging electronic technologies
Research activities in the group encompass a wide range of themes at the cutting-edge of nanoscale science and nanotechnology - principal interests lie in the synthesis and characterisation of new nanomaterials, such as nanodiamonds, silicon nanocrystals, gold nitride (AuN) and photon reactions on ice.
The purpose of this FP7 supported project is the creation of a critical and commented database on the health, safety and environmental impact of nanoparticles.
Within the NILaustria project cluster the consortium will use Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL) to provide a versatile and cost efficient solution to achieve ultra high quality, large area nanostructures. The consortium brings together all Austrian research institutions using NIL and the two NIL-related companies in Austria, i.e. NIL equipment manufacturer EVG and IMS developing a novel method for NIL template fabrication.
The Nile University Center for Nanotechnology aims to improve Egyptian global competitiveness and stimulate targeted sectors of the economy by capacity building and development of intellectual property in important emerging technologies.
The Center's mission is to contribute to the development of human resources, knowledge, and technology essential for Egypt and the region, to secure a share in the fast-growing global electronics industry and economy.
The NIMIC consortium (Nano-IMaging under Industrial Conditions) is aimed at making a wide variety of physical, chemical and biological processes visible that take place on the scale of atoms and molecules. The powerful, new microscopes that NIMIC develops are being applied to catalysis, breast cancer research and nanotechnology.
Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) is being established by the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). The polyner department houses a nanomaterial research unit.
This EU FP6 project aims at developing a nonviral vector for gene delivery, able of a) gene transfection in vivo and on a large amount of cells, b) local and non invasive therapy, c) frequent and easy medication. This nano-device will be based on a carbon nanotube.
The AML is designed to be the world's best measurement laboratory. NIST and its partners will be able to produce the measurements and standards needed to move key 21st-century technologies from the research horizon on to the factory floor.
This EU FP6 project focuses on an innovative bottom-up approach to fabrication and integration of nanoelectronic devices, based on self-assembling semiconductor nanowires. The primary target is to deliver replacement and add-on technologies to silicon CMOS, such as FET devices for logics and III-V bipolar transistors for RF applications.
The world's first government-sponsored organization dedicated to developing the biotechnology industry (including bionanotechnology). The center's mission is to provide long-term economic and societal benefits to North Carolina through support of biotechnology research, business and education statewide.
The NC Center of Innovation for Nanobiotechnology (COIN) is a non-profit organization with the goal of increasing commercialization of nanobiotechnologies in North Carolina. COIN's goal is to create synergy among existing statewide resources and bridge any gaps that are potential barriers to growth. This will bolster state-wide nanobiotech infrastructure and economic growth, delivering quality of life benefits to mankind.
The research activities in the center are directed towards understanding the fundamental science of nanoscale materials and utilizing their unique properties for commerical applications.
Located at North Dakota State University, Fargo, in the NDSU Research & Technology Park, CNSE has grown from five to approximately 65 scientists, engineers and support staff since its founding in 2002. More than 80 NDSU students and faculty work with these professionals on research with federal and state agencies, companies, universities and government laboratories. We currently expend about $18 million annually on our research and development programs.
(in German) A networking initiative between academic working groups and industry.
The CHN is a nanoscale science and engineering center at Northeastern in partnership with U. of Massachusetts Lowell and the U. of New Hampshire.
The center aims to perform studies on the border between two fast growing scientific areas, Biotechnology and Nanomedicine.
The George J. Kostas Nanoscale Technology and Manufacturing Research Center is the primary facility for micro and nanofabrication at Northeastern University. The Kostas facility also serves as the main facility for the new NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) at Northeastern University, in partnership with the University of Massachusetts Lowell, and the University of New Hampshire.
Research in Prof. Matteo Rinaldi's lab deals with nicro/nano electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS) devices; micro and nano fabrication; MEMS/NEMS sensors for physical, chemical and biological detection; radio frequency (RF) MEMS/NEMS devices and systems; integration of MEMS/NEMS devices with electronics; piezoelectric materials; MEMS/NEMS metamaterials; nanomaterials and nanostructures.
The Northern California Nanotechnology Initiative, NCnano, is an economic development initiative focused on developing the nanotechnology and the nano-bio-IT convergence technology economy of Northern California.
Collects and links information about the activities of a wide variety of innovative nanoscience and nanotechnology research, education, and business activities in the Northwest region of the US.
NUANCE Center integrates three existing complementary instrumentation facilities at NU: EPIC, NIFTI, and Keck-II under a unified management umbrella, and consolidated into contiguous space. These three facilities are a unique, centralized, resource for the NU community and beyond.
The Bio-inspired Sensors and Optoelectronics Lab (BISOL) has a general goal of producing novel photonics and optoelectronic devices inspired by nature. Current research is focused on infrared detectors and vision systems, nano-scale lasers, visible to terahertz plasmonics, and novel nano-processing.
The Center for Nanofabrication and Molecular Self-Assembly (NAMSA), one of the first federally and privately funded nanotechnology facilities of its kind in the nation, is home to scientists and engineers dedicated to the pursuit of new technologies.
The center's mission is to pursue academic excellence and high-level research in compound semiconductor science and nanotechnology.
The Hersam Research Group at Northwestern University develops scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques that enable sensing, characterization, and actuation at the single molecule level.
The Institute for Nanotechnology was established as an umbrella organization for the multimillion dollar nanotechnology research efforts at Northwestern University. The role of the Institute is to support meaningful efforts in nanotechnology, house state-of-the-art nanomaterials characterization facilities, and nucleate individual and group efforts aimed at addressing and solving key problems in nanotechnology.
The MEMS and Nanomechanics group is focused on characterizing mechanical behavior and properties of materials at small scale, biomaterials and artificial bio-inspired materials, materials at high strain rates, and on developing the expertise and tools to address micro and nanoscale fabrication and testing.
The research of the Mirkin Research Group at Northwestern focuses on developing methods for controlling the architecture of molecules and materials on the 1-100 nm length scale, and utilizing such structures in the development of analytical tools that can be used in the areas of chemical and biological sensing, lithography, catalysis, and optics.
The group's vision is to develop innovative technologies that harness biomolecular activity perfected by nature towards applications in cellular interrogation, bio-energetic/functional materials development, and next-generation medicine.
The Stupp laboratory at Northwestern University
The group harnesses molecular recognition and self-assembly processes in template-directed protocols for the synthesis of functionalized and mechanized molecules, prior to their being introduced into integrated nanosystems.
The Norwegian NanoMedicine Network is an initiative aiming to gather the main Norwegian players in research, industry and public administration within the nanomedicine field.
The aim of NTNU NanoLab is to establish a cross-disciplinary research environment for researchers within the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, electrical engineering, materials technology and medical research.
The convergence of multiple disciplines creates a synergy capable of overcoming persistent barriers and filling knowledge gaps to allow for transformational, revolutionary, and embryonic opportunities with many technological applications. The Institute's tools and research methodologies include in-depth analysis using convergence of multi/trans-disciplinary S&T fields, focused on nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, cognitive sciences, artificial intelligence, robotics, and genetics.
The Center's goal is to develop state of the art techniques for micro and nanoscale contaminant control, mitigation, removal and characterization in manufacturing and fabrication processes.
The mission of the Center, housed within the Rensselaer Nanotechnology Center (RNC), is to integrate research, education, and technology dissemination, and serve as a national resource for fundamental knowledge and applications, in directed assembly of nanostructures.
The center's mission is to create high throughput, reliable and versatile nanomanufacturing systems and associated processes through transformative research, education of leaders and global and industrial engagement that will revolutionize future generations of mobile computing and energy devices.
The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a collaborative nanoscience user research facility for the synthesis, characterization, theory, modeling, simulation, and design of nanoscale materials. It is one of five Nanoscale Science Research Centers currently being established by the Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy.
The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) integrates nanoscale science with neutron science; synthesis science; and theory, modeling, and simulation. Operating as a national user facility, the CNMS supports a multidisciplinary environment for research to understand nanoscale materials and phenomena.
OMNT's mission is to provide a continuous technical watch on key subjects in Micro and nanotechnologies.
The mission of this EU-funded project is to create a European Observatory on Nanotechnologies to present reliable, complete and responsible science-based and economic expert analysis, across technology sectors, establish dialogue with decision makers and others regarding the benefits and opportunities, balanced against barriers and risks, and allow them to take action to ensure that scientific and technological developments are realized as socio-economic benefits.
ONAP at the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology is a pilot project designed to assist qualified Oklahoma companies with the process of applying nanotechnology through research, development, and manufacturing to improve current products or processes or create new, cutting-edge products or processes.
The Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail (IRSST) is a scientific research organization with activities concentrated in seven research fields: accidents, chemical substances and biological agents, musculoskeletal disorders, noise and vibration, protective equipment, occupational rehabilitation, safety of industrial tools, machines and processes. Plans for an integrated nanotechnology research program are underway.
In March 2007, the OECD's Committee on Scientific and Technological Policy (CSTP) established a Working Party on Nanotechnology. The objective of this Working Party is to promote international co-operation that facilitates research, development, and responsible commercialisation of nanotechnology in member countries and in non-member economies.
EMNLAB is a group within the physical electronics branch of Electrical Engineering at The Ohio State University. The group focuses on using a wide array of analysis, processing, and growth techniques to investigate the surface, interface, and ultrathin film properties of semiconductors.
A fundamental question to be addressed in the group's research is how we can learn from biological systems in nature, especially at the micro/nano-scale, in order to engineer biocompatible nanomaterials and further develop innovative robotic systems that are capable of interfacing with molecular and cellular systems for advanced therapeutics and tissue engineering applications, and for swimming efficiently in fluidic environment.
The goal of the center is to create devices that will make diagnosing, treating and managing diseases easier, less expensive and more effective.
The group's research is focused on the computational analysis of the flow, heat and mass transfer in micro and nano fluidic systerms. Current research projects include modeling of an implantable artifical kidney, DNA translocation in nanopores and fundamental issues associated with bio-sensing.
A major nanoprobe laboratory with a focus on bio/nanotechnology and biomimetics was organized in July 1991 with the initial financial support from the state of Ohio and The Ohio State University. More than 5700 square feet of laboratory space was made available for this purpose. The laboratory is populated with the modern scientific equipment needed to conduct state-of-the-art research.
ENCOMM NanoSystems Laboratory is operated by the OSU Center for Electronic and Magnetic Nanoscale Composite Multifunctional Materials. Its goal is to provide academic and industrial users with access to advanced material characterization and fabrication tools for research and development applications.
The center facility for nanotech research at Ohio State.
Nanoscale research at Ohio University's Department of Physics.
The group combines experiments, theory, and modeling to explore the dynamics and properties of flows involving nano- or micro-structures (i.e., DNA, surfactants, lipid vesicles, or bacteria, cells), in which intermolecular/particle forces give rise to time- and length-scale distributions that are important in many biophysical and technological processes.
This research unit studies the structural, magnetic, electronic, chemical properties and applications of size selected monometallic, bimetallic and core?shell nanoclusters/nanoparticles prepared by magnetron sputter gas aggregation source.
A Source for Nano News, Events and Useful Links in the State of Oklahoma.
The central theme of the group's research program is the development and application of cutting-edge bio- and nano- technologies and ultrasensitive analytical methodologies to address fundamental and practical questions in chemical, biochemical and biomedical research.
The Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute is Oregon's first 'Signature Research Center' for the purpose of growing research and commercialization to accelerate innovation-based economic development in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest.
The ONE-P ('Organic nano-materials for electronics and photonics: design, synthesis, characterisation, processing, fabrication and applications') project has been allocated EUR 18 million under the 'Nanosciences, nanotechnologies, materials and new production technologies' (NMP) Theme of the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). The project counts 28 partners from 10 EU Member States. The ONE-P project will work in the fast-growing world of organic, carbon-based semiconductors.
Onera (Office National d'Etudes et Recherches Aérospatiales) is the French national aerospace research center. Its expertise is organized into 17 departments. Research includes nanotechnology.
Research in Prof. Xu's group is directed toward the integration of 'Nano', 'Bio', and 'Chem' at femtoliter, attoliter, and single molecule scales through nanofluidics. They continue to involve the study and development of novel nanofluidic methods and devices for single cell omics, single molecule chemistry, biomaterials, nanomedicine, energy, and process engineering.
Ultra high spatial-resolution and sensitivity for sensing biomolecules and DNA can be achieved by the use of nanotechnology such as scanning probe techniques and non-linear photonics using ultra short pulsed lasers. The Group is evolving these techniques to create new biological applications, particularly, real-time measurement of the chemical reactions occurring in living cells and tissue.
The Institute for NanoScience Design prepares various kinds of education and training programs such as trans-disciplinary graduate-school minor program, evening course refresher program, short-term international research training program, etc. It offers a series of lectures, some of them in the form of distance education broadcasted live to satellite classrooms located many places in Japan, and tentatively even overseas in English.
LaSIE is doing some of the world's frontier research in photonics, nanotechnology (nanophotonics, nanofabrication), and bio-related areas.
The Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Center proactively promotes industrial applications of nanotechnology while carrying out bottom-up and top-down technologies.
The Protonic NanoMachine Group aims at the ultimate understanding of the mechanisms of self-assembly and its regulation, conformational switching, force generation, and energy transduction by biological macromolecular complexes.
Research in the group focuses mainly on molecular signaling systems that transmit and convert cell and gene information, in which dynamic organization into the bio-system is deeply related to the function. Techniques including imaging technique of single molecules in 3D and real time aer being developed to visualize and manipulate single molecules in bio-systems and the behavior, structural changes and physical and chemical properties of individual bio-molecules acting in bio-molecular systems will be monitored in real time and space.
The group is working on Rotary Molecular Motors. In particular the Bacterial Flagellar Motor and F1-ATPase. The aim is to try and understand how these living machines work.
The group is active in these research areas: Additive Nanomanufacturing; Optoelectronics of Phase Change Materials; Nanometrology; Nanoelectromechanical Systems (NEMS).
The PNNL operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, is a recognized leader in nanomaterials and nanobiology. Together with other Battelle managed labs, Brookhaven National Laboratory, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, they represent a diverse collaborative team in nanoscience, nanoengineering and nanotechnology
PRINS is the Research Infrastructure arm of a broader initiative, the ENIAC European Technology Platform. PRINS will bridge the area between research and market-driven applications and provide Europe with the ability to master the revolutionary transition from Microelectronics to Nanoelectronics, i.e. down to the level of individual atoms.
PARC collaborates with sponsors and clients to discover breakthrough business and technology concepts that solve real needs, and transform how enterprises deliver value to customers.
The mission of the PDI is to perform materials research, solid state physics, and nanotechnology on low-dimensional structures. Activities include nanofabrication and nanoanalytics.
A Swiss-based laboratory for micro and nanotechnology.
Polymers, materials and nanomotor research.
The 2DCC-MIP is a national user facility, supported by the National Science Foundation, that is focused on the development of two dimensional (2D) chalcogenides for applications in next generation electronics beyond silicon for digital circuits and flexible electronics. These materials include 2D transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) films that are only a few atoms thick, topological insulator (TI) bismuth chalcogenide films that only conduct on the 2D surface, and multilayers of dissimilar chalcogenide films whose properties are dominated by 2D interfaces.
PennState's Center for Nanoscale Science was established as an NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center to carry out interdiciplinary and eductaional outreach in the areas of Molecular nanofabrication, Biomolecular Motors, and Collective Phenomena in Restricted Geometries
CNEU is the home of the Pennsylvania Nanofabrication Manufacturing Technology (NMT) Partnership and the National Science Foundation (NSF) Regional Center for Nanofabrication Manufacturing Education
The mission of the Center for Two Dimensional and Layered Materials is to conduct leading international and multidisciplinary research on 2D layered materials aiming at finding new phenomena and applications, that could be transformed into high impact products. The center offers a unique, vertically integrated research education to graduate and undergraduate students, with extremely valuable components including state-of-the-art infrastructure, and research environment.
The Penn State Nanofab offers expertise in 'top-down' (e.g. deposition, etching) and 'bottom up' (e.g. self-assembling films) nanofabrication.
Professor of Polymer Science and Chemistry at PennState University
The Center for Nanoscale Science is a Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) supported by the National Science Foundation. The Center supports collaborative, interdisciplinary research efforts in the area of nanoscale materials. The research themes are focused broadly on nanomaterial synthesis and fabrication, complex oxide thin films, nano- and micro-motors, low-dimensional electronic nanostructures, and integrated optical metamaterials.
The mission of the Center for Two Dimensional and Layered Materials is to conduct leading international and multidisciplinary research on 2D layered materials aiming at finding new phenomena and applications, that could be transformed into high impact products. The center offers a unique, vertically integrated research education to graduate and undergraduate students, with extremely valuable components including state-of-the-art infrastructure, and research environment.
The mission of the Center for Two Dimensional and Layered Materials is to conduct leading international and multidisciplinary research on 2D layered materials aiming at finding new phenomena and applications, that could be transformed into high impact products. The center offers a unique, vertically integrated research education to graduate and undergraduate students, with extremely valuable components including state-of-the-art infrastructure, and research environment.
Prof. Donghai Wang's Energy Nanostructure Laboratory (E-Nano) focuses on nanomaterial development for clean energy technologies, such as batteries, solar cells, fuel cells, and environmental remediation.
The Mallouk group at PennState takes a building block or 'Lego' approach to the synthesis of interesting inorganic materials from the bottom up. Some of this research is very fundamental in nature and is designed to learn the rules of assembly of objects on the nanometer and micron length scales.
The PHANTOMS Foundation is a non-profit organisation, whose mission is to provide a platform of services and information for researchers active in Nanotechnology and Emerging Nanoelectronics in particular. This mission is accomplished by establishing a network of researchers that exchange experience and their latest results through several channels such as workshops, newsletters, WEB site, etc
A world-class interdisciplinary place for applied research aiming at business creation in the field of microsystems and nanotechnologies, enabled by innovations in materials and processing methods, state-of-the-art cleanroom infrastructure and a full spectrum of characterization facilities.
Phonasum is a network of researchers and practitioners working in the field of photocatalysis from all around Europe. The main objective is to increase via a concerted European effort the fundamental knowledge of nanocrystalline photoactive materials and development of new products, which utilize self sterilizing and self cleaning photoactive materials in specific industrially relevant application fields such as self-cleaning and anti-microbial surfaces, water treatment, air purification and general hygienic applications.
PHOREMOST is the result of a decision to establish a Network of Excellence in the area of Nanophotonics and Molecular Photonics to address the near- and long term needs of photonic functional components.
This joint effort gathers a number of leading German research institutions from the Max Planck Society, the Helmholtz Society, and the Fraunhofer Society together with partners from Germany's Photonics industry. The PhoNa consortium conducts research on a broad spectrum of linear and nonlinear Photonic Nanomaterials, as e.g. metamaterials, photonic crystals, plasmonics, diffractive structures, and their application in fields such as biology, chemistry and material sciences.
This European consortium explores computing inside a single molecule using atomic scale technologies.
Quantum mechanics lies at the core of many of today's technologies as well as ongoing scientific discoveries and future innovations. The Pittsburgh Quantum Institute was established in 2012 to help unify and promote research in quantum science and engineering in the Pittsburgh area. PQI members have faculty appointments from Carnegie Mellon University, Duquesne University and the University of Pittsburgh in physics, chemistry and engineering disciplines. On this site you can find research profiles of PQI members, read about the latest research achievements, learn about PQI seminars and other events, and find connections to related centers in the Pittsburgh area.
EU-funded research project that aims to make plasmonics a key element in the future of the European photonics industry.
The first European research project that aims to utilize plasmonics for system-level applications and bring them into a Tb/s optical routing fabric for data interconnects.
PneumoNP is a collaborative research program aiming at the development of a nanotheragnostic system for the treatment of Gram-negative bacterial infections of the lung, with focus on Klebsiella pneumoniae caused infections.
The group of Professor Jin Kon Kim conducts research in high density data storage, polymerization and membrane with high selectivity using block copolymer nanostructures.
The CSS was established in 1997 to develop new supramolecular assemblies with desired structures, properties and functions by utilizing the principles of molecular recognition and self assembly. Emphasis is placed on the supramolecular systems that can provide the operating principles of molecular switch, molecular memory, and sensor.
Research on the development of new and facile synthetic routes for the formation of functional nanostructures and their applications.
Nanomaterials: physics of magnetic and molecular (dielectric) nanostructured materials for future applications in novel electronics.
Clays, Mesoporous Oxides, Nanostructures Group.
The Department of Soft Condensed Matter deals with research topics such as Hydrogen Storage in Nanoporous Materials, photonic crystals or self-assenbling systems.
The Group has a well established experience in growth, characterization and processing of semiconductors and insulating materials.
INRC specializes in providing applied and theoretical research and development in the scientific and technological fields of material, chemical and environmental engineering, with a focus on the development, marketing, commercialization and manufacturing of advanced nanocomposites.
The Center's function is to facilitate research and education in nanoscale science and technology by developing particle-beam methods for fabricating and examining small structures.
Research includes organic conducting nanolayers, e.g. PANI films. Applications: sensors, FET, nanowiring, nano- and molecular electronics.
PINSAT offeres BS and MS courses in nanosciences and nanotechnology.
PRISM is a multidisciplinary research center at Princeton University in the general field of materials science through photonics with a special emphasis on the hard material - soft material interface.
The mission of NanoStructures Laboratory (NSL) is to explore and develop 1) New nanotechnologies that will fabricate structures substantially smaller, better, and cheaper than current technology permits. and 2) Innovative nanoscale electronic, optoelectronic, and magnetic devices by combining cutting-edge nanotechnology with frontier knowledge from different disciplines.
The goal of this European Sixth Framework Programme Project is the development of a fast and flexible method for production of functions within 3D photonic crystals.
Established in April 2005 as a partnership between the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and the Pew Charitable Trusts. The Project is dedicated to helping ensure that as nanotechnologies advance, possible risks are minimized, public and consumer engagement remains strong, and the potential benefits of these new technologies are realized.
It is the aim of the FP6 program PRONANO that the new massively parallel scanning probe nanotools with VLSI ASNEMS (application specific nanoelectromechanical systems) chips inside should empower nanotechnologists and drive the rapid development of nanoscience, leading to new nanotechnology processes and their industrial exploitation. They will secure the future of nanotechnology with economic throughputs leading to new manufacturing industries.
ProTeM (Probe-based Terabit Memory) is an EU FP6 Integrated Project funded by the IST Micro-and Nanosystems programme. Aim of the project is to develop Probe Storage micro-nano techniques and systems for ultra-high capacity, low power, small form-factor memories, with a particular focus on archival and backup applications.
The protonic NanoMachine Project focuses on the roles of protons as energy and signal carriers in the complex network formed by a vast number of macromolecular nanomachines that support various activities of life.
PULLNANO is a 30-month Integrated Project from the 6th Framework Programme proposal for a powerful project focused on advanced Research and Technological Development activities to push forward the limits of CMOS technologies. PULLNANO focuses on the development of 32 and 22nm CMOS technology nodes opening the way to the long term future of these technologies.
The projects at Purdue reach across the categories of nanomaterials, nanodevices, nano/bio interfaces, nanomanufacturing, computational nanotechnology, and nanometrology/characterization.
The Institute for Nanoelectronics Discovery and Exploration (INDEX) - one of just four such nanoelectronics research institutes in the country ? is located at CNSE's Albany NanoTech complex. The INDEX institute focuses on cutting-edge research in the field of nanotechnology, including the development of nanomaterials, fabrication technologies, nanochip designs and architectural integration schemes for realizing the computer nanochip designs of the future.
The Nanoelectronic Modeling Group works in the area of nanoelectronics where we try to better the understanding of electron flow through nano-scale devices. The effort on modeling and simulation is heavily computer based. They try to connect to experimental results which they try to explain or even predict experiments.
The Purdue University - US Forest Service Forest Products Laboratory joint research program in nanoscale science and engineering of wood-based materials has three main drivers in forestry based nanotechnology, fundamental knowledge development, applied product development, and new technological innovations.
nanoHUB is a web-based initiative spearheaded by the NSF- Network for Computational Nanotechnology. Its mission is to serve as a resource for research and education in the areas of nano-electronics, NEMS, and their application to nano-biosystems and to be the place where experiment, theory and simulation meet and move nanoscience to nanotechnology. The Nanohub provides online simulation services as well as courses, tutorials, seminars, debates, and facilities for collaboration.
The lab is building and expanding the understanding of the fundamentals of atomic-level carrier transport and interactions, and is applying this knowledge to important energy, information, and biomedical technologies.
Nanoscale Science and Engineering embodies fundamental research and technology development of materials, structures, devices, processes, and systems where at least one physical dimension is on the length scale of approximately 1-100 nanometers. This is a current area of strength and a future area of growth at Purdue. In the department of Chemical Engineering there are 11 faculty involved with federally funded research programs in the area.
Created by the Network for Computational Nanotechnology, a consortium of eight member universities dedicated to furthering research and education in nanotechnology, nanoHUB.org offers free simulation, education, collaboration, and publication to the nanotechnology community.
The lab develops new classes of nanostructured metal-dielectric composites and their applications in nanophotonics, opto-electronics and spectroscopy.
The nanophysics lab uses innovative experimental techniques to examine the physical properties of objects in the nanoscale size range. The lab focuses primarily on scanning probe techniques.
The research carried out by the Centre covers two themes, nanoscale functional materials and devices and nanooptics and plasmonics.
Research includes nanoscale amterials such as nano polymers.
The aim of IMM is to conduct research in the field of functional molecular structures and materials. There is an emphasis on understanding and controlling complexity in order to be able to design new functionality in these systems. This research area can roughly be divided into two main themes: bio-inspired systems and nano/mesoscopic structures.
The RADSAS project aims at developing efficient strategies for parallel, two-dimensional molecular self-assembly on surfaces, which we consider an indispensable prerequisite for the technical realization of supra-molecular design and engineering.
RECEPTRONICS is a research project funded by the European Commission within the VIth Work Program under the Nanotechnologies and Nanosciences priority. The goal of this project is to develop low-cost, label-free biomolecular detectors/sentinels by integrating concepts and methods from bionanotechnology and micro-/nanoelectronics. More specifically, the project aims to design, fabricate, test and validate a biomorphic hybrid technology by which biological self-assembling structures are interfaced with advanced electronic circuits for signal detection, amplification and conditioning.
(Portugese language site) National research network on semiconductor nanodevices and nanostructured materials.
(Portugese language site) Nanotechnology research network in Brazil.
(Portugese language site) National nanobiotechnology network.
The CCNI is designed both to help continue the impressive advances in shrinking device dimensions seen by electronics manufacturers, and to extend this model to a wide array of industries that could benefit from nanotechnology.
The research focus of this NSF-funded Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) for Directed Assembly of Nanostructures is to discover and develop the means to assemble nanoscale building blocks with unique properties into functional structures under well-controlled, intentionally directed conditions. Their overall mission is to integrate research, education, and technology dissemination to serve as a national and international resource for fundamental knowledge and applications in directed assembly of nanostructures.
Building upon the Institute's traditional strengths in materials science and engineering, Rensselaer researchers are part of a pre-eminent group of scientists around the world working to manipulate matter with atomic precision. With an NSF Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center on campus, a new microelectronics clean room capable of fabrication on the nano-level, and a talented group of biotechnology researchers bringing nano-capabilities to their work, Rensselaer has taken a place at the heart of what has been framed by some as the next 'industrial revolution'.
The Center is primarily involved with fundamental nanotechnology research in materials, devices and systems. By combining computational design with experimentation the Center's researchers are discovering novel pathways to assemble functional multiscale nanostructures with junctions and interfaces between structurally, dimensionally, and compositionally different nanoscale building blocks to create useful hierarchical material systems.
The CNI is a center of excellence for nanoelectronics at the Research Center Jülich and provides an excellent basis for future developments of nanoelectronics and IT. To identify technology drivers the research areas cover quantum-electronic, magneto-electronic, ferro-electric and molecular nanostructures as well as Terahertz-electronics and bio-signal processing.
RTI International is one of the world's leading research institutes, dedicated to improving the human condition by turning knowledge into practice. Research at RTI includes nanofibers, nanomembranes and other nanomaterials and naotechnology applications.
This site proposes a whole set of tools and interactive content designed for a better understanding of the social and economic dynamics related to the world development of nanotechnologies
The Rhode Island Consortium for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology was established in 2010 by Congress as a joint entity between the University of Rhode Island and Brown University.
Research in RQI encompasses advanced materials, quantum magnetism, plasmonics and photonics, biophysics, ultracold atom physics, condensed matter and chemical physics, and all aspects of nanoscience and nanotechnology.
Faculty in the Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering hold joint appointments in several other departments: mechanical engineering, bioengineering, chemistry, chemical and biomolecular engineering, electrical and computer engineering, civil and environmental engineering and physics and astronomy.
The Halas Nanophotonics Group at Rice University
Dedicated to the development of optics at the nanoscale
The Hafner Nano-Bio Lab at Rice University works at the Nano-Bio interface.
The Nanomaterials, Nanomechanics and Nanodevices lab (N3L) at Rice University is led by Prof. Jun Lou. Their interests lie in the areas of nanomaterial synthesis, nanomechanical characterization and nanodevice fabrication for energy, environmental and biomedical applications.
NEWT is applying nanotechnology to develop transformative and off-grid water treatment systems that both protect human lives and support sustainable economic development.
The Institute's mission is to provide a venue where researchers from all disciplines of science and engineering can come together to share ideas and discuss their views and prospects of nanoscience, nanoengineering, and nanotechnology.
The Tour group at Rice University. Scientific research areas include molecular electronics, chemical self-assembly, conjugated oligomers, electroactive polymers, combinatorial routes to precise oligomers, polymeric sensors, flame retarding polymer additives, carbon nanotube modification and composite formation, synthesis of molecular motors and nanotrucks, use of the NanoKids concept for K-12 education in nanoscale science.
The group's research focuses on the development of functional oxides based thin film devices utilizing photonic, electronic, and magnetic properties; the fabrication of conducting oxide based superstructure and their potential investigation as thermoelectric materials; the development of special epitaxial growth method; and the development of novel oxide spintronics devices.
The group explores advanced molecular photonics based on semiconducting quantum dots, photofunctional organic molecules, and laser manipulation techniques.
The group's research focuses on plasmonics for photochemistry and photophysics, including following sub-topics: Plasmonic Waveguiding; Single Molecule Studies; Plasmon Associated Energy Harvesting; Drug Delivery System based on Plasmonics.
Researchers in the lab are involved in a variety of research aimed at integrating and combining top-down and bottom-up phenomena.
The lab is researching inorganic optical material with its robust frame structure, and are conducting research on the expression of optical functions through formation of nanostructures on the surface.
Nanochemistry and materials - plasma and powders.
RIKEN carries out high level experimental and research work in a wide range of fields, including physics, chemistry, medical science, biology, and engineering, covering the entire range from basic research to practical application.
Research includes: Three-dimensional multi-layered tera byte optical storage with gold nano-particles; Chiral nanophotonics; Near-field Vibrational Nanophotonics; Plasmonic Band Gap Devices; Plasmonic Metamaterials; Metallic Nanolens.
The specific targeted research project RIMANA (Radical Innovation Maskless Nanolithography) aims to research and develop a key maskless nanolithography technology for low to medium volume production, essential for the semiconductor industry and emerging nanotechnology industry.
Research target is establishment of new evaluation technique for MEMS / NEMS material properties. Research of silicon nanolithography technique and development of MEMS/NEMS devices are also performed.
The Centre for Advanced Materials and Industrial Chemistry (CAMIC) is a multidisciplinary centre that strives to undertake high quality fundamental and applied research. The interconnected research themes in the centre allow materials scientists, nanotechnologists and applied scientists with industrial experience to undertake ambitious research projects from conception to real world implementation.
The Laboratory of Artificial Intelligence Nanophotonics develops nanophotonic devices inspired by ideas from artificial intelligence and brain science for a smarter and greener future.
Current activities in the laboratory center around micro/nano-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS/NEMS) and micro/nanofluidics.
The group's research focuses on fundamental as well as applied aspects of quantum theory. Since quantum effects are usually pronounced when thermal disturbances are low, our research has a significant overlap with low temperature physics. Specifically, they are interested in laser-cooled atoms and molecules, cryogenically or radiatively cooled nanomechanics, and superconductors.
As part of RIT's Microsystems Engineering Ph.D. Program, the 'epitaxially-integrated nanoscale systems' (EINS) lab focuses on applied physics and engineering at the nanometer scale. At the center of the group's research is the atomic-level assembly or epitaxy of III-V compound semiconductors by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD).
The NanoPower Research Labs at RIT are dedicated to the development of new materials and devices for power generation and storage for microelectronic components and micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS).
European FP7 project that aims to develop cost effective and highly efficient solar cells with silicon nano-rods.
The group studies the structure, dynamics and interactions of biomolecules in model systems.
The RO-NANOMED project is devoted to the creation and development of an integrated research network in the field of nanobiotechnology for health. This network is targeting integration into the European Technology Platform (ETP) 'NanoMedicine'.
The activity of the group focuses on two main areas. On the one hand, the Group develops and applies new chemometric techniques related to the validation of analytical methodologies. On the other hand, the second main activity of the Group is the transfer of knowledge and technology.
The group works on modeling and design of linear and nonlinear photonic crystals; the development of technologies based on the macroporous ordered silicon and on the nanoporous silicon for the production of 1D and 2D photonic crystals; and the development of physical models for advanced electronic devices: Thin-film transistors, nanometric-sized MOSFETs, silicon-based heterojunction devices.
The Royal Microscopical Society is at the forefront of new ideas and developments in microscopy and imaging. It is the only truly international microscopical society, drawing distinguished members from all over the world. It also serves the needs of its company members who represent all the major manufacturers and suppliers of microscopes, equipment and services. It is dedicated to advancing science, developing careers and supporting wider understanding of science and microscopy.
A website dedicated to the Royal Society's 2004 report 'Nanoscience and nanotechnologies: opportunities and uncertainties'.
RTI, an advanced technology research institute, initiated a focus on nanotechnology to consolidate and coordinate years of successful work in thermoelectrics, materials science and engineering, and filtration and aerosol technology.
Multidisciplinary basic research into the nature and limits to self-organization in combinatorially complex chemical systems. Electronic micro-and nanosystems provide controlled and programmable environments for studying and optimizing such systems, and so our research is also forging a link between the three rapidly expanding technologies: Information Technology (IT), Biotechnology (BT) and Nanotechnology (NT).
ICAMS focuses on the development and application of a new generation of simulation tools for multi-scale materials modelling with the aim of reducing development cost and time for new materials.
The Russian Corporation of Nanotechnology (RCNT) was established to address the growing challenge that arises with the rapid development of new technologies in the nanoscale. The key directions of RCNT's activity are: 1) provide assistance to the state policies in the sphere of nanotechnology; 2) development of the innovative infrastructure for nanotechnologies; 3) achievement of projects aimed at creating innovative nanotechnologies and nanoindustries.
The society unites the Russian scientists and engineers working in various areas of a science and engineering: physics of a surface, physics of semiconductors, biophysics, physical chemistry, microelectronics and organisations involved in researches in the area of SPM, developments in the area of instrument making with application SPM, foreign scientists promoting development SPM in Russia
The Institute provides support, coordination and oversight for three large groups of research programs in the areas of Energy and Environment, Electronics, Photonics and Sensors, and Nanobiology.
The broad goal of the project SA-NANO is to achieve unprecedented control and understanding of self assembly of shape controlled colloidal nanocrystals.
The Center is engaged in highly effective multidisciplinary research programs, bringing together researchers with expertise spanning advanced materials, nano-bio technology, nano-electronics, micro-nano fluidics, micro-nano-electromechanical systems and nano-engineering.
Sabio is a European multidisciplinary project involving the emerging fields of micro-nano technology, photonics, fluidics and bio-chemistry, targeting to contribute to the development of intelligent diagnosis equipments for the healthcare of the future. Sabio will address this objective through the demonstration of a compact polymer-based and silicon-based CMOS-compatible micro-nano system.
The SIINN ERA-NET promotes the safe and rapid transfer of European research results in nanoscience and nanotechnology (N&N) into industrial applications. National and regional resources will be virtually pooled to create a transnational programme of research. SIINN will bring together today?s fragmented research activities on the potential risks of engineered nanomaterials for environment, human health, and safety.
SAFENANO at the Institute of Occupational Medicine is the UK Micro and Nanotechnology Centre of Excellence providing nanotechnology safety services to industry, academia and government.
The aim of SafeNano Norway is to create a self-sustaining national network for industry and scientists to develop safe nanotechnology and increase public confidence in nanoproducts.
The goals of the SNNI are to develop new nanomaterials and nanomanufacturing approaches that offer a high level of performance, yet pose minimal harm to human health or the environment.
SnIRC is based on existing collaborations between the Institute of Occupational Medicine in Edinburgh, Napier University, Aberdeen University, Edinburgh University and the US National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
Research in nanoelectronics.
The Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) is a DOE BES national user facility. The distinguishing characteristic of CINT is its emphasis on exploring the path from scientific discovery to the integration of nanostructures into the micro and macro worlds.
Provides new scientific knowledge in support of Sandia's national security mission, especially in the areas of nuclear weapons, energy and infrastructure assurance, nonproliferation and assessments, military technology and applications, and homeland security.
The SANDiE Network of Excellence is dedicated to the formation of an integrated and cohesive approach to research and knowledge in the field of Self-Assembled semiconductor Nanostructures.
Through special grants awarded by the NIH, the Burnham has been designated as one of four centers for devising new therapies for cardiovascular disease using bionanotechnology.
Sankara Nethralaya has today grown into one of the largest Ophthalmic Hospitals in the world. It's Clinical and Basic Research Activities include nanomedicine.
The project is based on the observation that diatoms, which are small unicellular algae, possess internal silica skeletons that are laid down due to the silica precipitating activity of specialised proteins called silaffins. These proteins have a highly repeating structure in which the repeated sequences are decorated with additional amine and phosphate groups. Whilst silaffins themselves are potent silica precipitants, synthetic peptides corresponding to these repeats will also act as silicating agents and will allow silica nanoparticles to be generated, provided phosphate is also supplied.
The Centre was established to carry out research on cutting-edge technologies in two of the most crucial sectors in the world - Healthcare and Energy. The Centre aims to develop products based on nanomaterials that could be commercialized in the near future.
The leading area of research includes nanomaterials, nanotechnology, nanocomposites, nanoelectronics, nanofabrication. In addition to research, the centre also conducts training and awareness programmes, workshops national and international conferences on recent trends and developments of Nanoscience on various themes of national interests. The centre is undertaking research and development projects from various agencies and is offering consultancy services to in industries and research organizations in India and abroad.
The STS Initiative's Nanoscience and Society Research Group at the University of Massachusetts Amherst brings together faculty from five research centers and seven degree-granting departments and programs within SBS engaged with several dimensions of the societal implications of nanotechnology.
The scientific goal of the EUROCORES Program SONS is to develop cross-disciplinary research at the interface between Chemistry, Materials Science, Nanoscience, Physics and Electrical Engineering. This research program concerns the utilization of supramolecular interactions for the synthesis and positioning of functional assemblies, macromolecules, dendrimers, liquid crystals, tailor-made polymers and inorganic nanoparticles.
Semi is the global association for suppliers enabling nanomaterials and nanomanufacturing technologies.
The Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) is the premier trade association representing the U.S. semiconductor industry, uniting 95 companies responsible for more than 85 percent of semiconductor production in this country.
The objective of SNU Graphene Research Lab. is to develop futuristic 2-dimensional nanomaterials with enhanced physical/chemical/biological and electrical/mechanical/optical properties, which can be applied to overcome the current limits of IT/BT/ET technologies.
Research on nano-scale hybrid systems comprised of solid state devices and organic materials.
The Major research activities in nano fabrication laboratory (NFL) are focused into two important technologies in materials science and engineering, which are nanotechnology and thin-film technology. For the contribution in nanotechnology, the key technology, the quantum dot formation is investigated by two major methods to form quantum dot, which are top-down and bottom-up approaches.
Site of the Korea-Sweden Carbon Based Nanostructure Research Center (KSCNR).
The core objective of the 'Nanosciences, Nanotechnologies, Materials and new Production Technologies (NMP)' theme is to improve the competitiveness of European industry and generate the knowledge needed to transform it from a resource-intensive to a knowledge-intensive industry.
Founded in 2005 INN intends to be the hub of Nanotechnology in the country and has the mission of promoting Nanotechnology in the university and in the country by providing a network of researchers from various disciplines and supporting activities that are related to Nanotechnology.
This project is about the ultimate nanocarbons "exotic nanocarbons", which are expected to make innovations possible in a wide number of fields ranging from the environment, energy, resources and ICT to biotechnology and medicine. Four distinguished researchers with differing backgrounds in nanotechnology were invited to participate in this project and they, together with Shinshu University and participating companies, are conducting joint research on a wide range of topics with the goal of making various advanced innovations.
The school offers B.Sc.-M.Sc. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (5 years integrated) courses.
An applications- and science-driven research centre of Simon Fraser University, focussing on accelerating the Design, Development, Demonstration and Delivery of advanced materials and nanoscale devices.
SINANO (Silicon-based Nanodevices) aims to strengthen European scientific and technological excellence in the field of electronics, Si-based nanodevices for terascale integrated circuits. This project is funded by the European Commission under the sixth EU Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development.
NMNL (Norwegian Micro and Nano Laboratories) is the research infrastructure in Norway hosted by SINTEF, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) and the University of Oslo (UiO).
The core objective of the 'Nanosciences, Nanotechnologies, Materials and new Production Technologies (NMP)' theme is to improve the competitiveness of European industry and generate the knowledge needed to transform it from a resource-intensive to a knowledge-intensive industry.
The Centre has been created from selected Departments of six Institutes of Slovak Academy of Sciences with the aim to reach the critical mass for systematic research and development of nanostructured and ultrafine grained materials with extraordinary properties.
The group seeks to understand how molecules and nanoparticles assemble spontaneously at the nano-micro scales. The work gives insights into the design and function of biomolecular structures. Moreover, they develop rules for the design of new types of fluids and materials that could be useful in consumer products, oil recovery, drug delivery and nanotechnology.
SMASH is a research project supported by the European Commission in the 7th Framework Programme. The overall goal of SMASH is to establish new materials solutions and process technologies based on nanostructured compound semiconductors, i.e. GaN, for low-cost, power-efficient light sources for the general lighting market.
The overarching goals of the group are: to facilitate the exchange of ideas and knowledge among practitioners, researchers, scholars, teachers, and others interested in risk analysis and emerging nanoscale materials; to encourage collaborative research on risk analysis and emerging nanoscale materials; and to provide leadership and play an active role in advancing issues related to risk analysis and emerging nanoscale materials.
The founding of the Society will coincide with its first annual conference in Seattle (September 2009). The Society for the Study of Nanoscience and Emerging Technologies (S-NET) is poised to become an international organization to promote open intellectual exchange towards the advancement of knowledge and understanding of nanotechnologies in society. S-NET represents diverse communities, viewpoints, and methodologies in the social sciences and humanities. It welcomes contributions from scientists and engineers that advance the critical reflection of nanotechnologies and related developments.
The Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry is a not-for-profit, worldwide professional organization comprised of individuals and institutions dedicated to the study, analysis and solution of environmental problems, the management and regulation of natural resources, research and development and environmental education. Our mission is to support the development of principles and practices for protection, enhancement and management of sustainable environmental quality and ecosystem integrity.
The ultimate goal of Choi's Group is to develop a biochip which can be used as a new generation electronic devices. In order to achieve those things, Choi's Group has studied the fundamental and advanced techniques involved in the development of the bio memory.
A number of universities, science councils and industrial companies active in nanotechnology formed SANi
The primary research objective of CAAN is to conduct research in nanotechnology with a strong potential for commercialization. The research to be conducted will be focused in areas of current expertise, namely, nanoparticles and associated aspects of nanosensors.
The center is focused on the areas of advanced photonics, including Fundamental Photonics, Information Photonics, Nanophotonics and Biophotonics.
The research group of MinJun Kim is active in research covering a wide variety of topics, including: Microbiorobotics, Soft robotics, Single molecule biophysics, Single cell analysis, Micro/nanofluidics.
A biophotonic micro-laboratory: Novel applications of all-optically micro-fluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. Optical tools for parallel manipulation of objects and optical trapping of objects with multiple-beam optical manipulators.
The Spanish Nanomedicine Platforms is an initiative aiming to agregate the main Spanish players in research, the industry and the public administration, with the final objective to boost the implementation of strategic lines in the nanomedicine field, characterized by its interdisciplinarity.
'Surface Plasmon Early Detection of Circulation Heat Shock Proteins' (SPEDOC) is a multidisciplinary European FP7 research project for early diagnosis, treatment monitoring and follow-up of cancer at the level of oncology research institutes. The goal of this three year project is the early detection of cancer by combining the latest advances of nano-optics, optical manipulation and microfluidics with the ultimate findings on the heat shock protein HSP70-recently shown to increase its expression in cancer cells. Ultrasensitive tracking of HSP70 proteins may yield to future devices enabling point of care diagnosis and eventually lead to individualized therapy.
The aim of this European research project is to study nanoscale self-assembly in two systems. Both use surfactant micelles as a template structure to hierarchically order polyelectrolytes on several length scales.
Spintec is a research laboratory aiming at bridging fundamental research and product development in the exciting field of spin electronics.
The Sri Lanka Institute of Nanotechnology envisions being the leading Research and Innovation platform for Sustainable Nanotechnology in Asia. Thereby transforming Sri Lanka into a strong Nanotechnology-focused nation.
The group is involved in materials innovation for enabling new device structures and concepts. They study wide range of electronic materials at nanoscale to understand importance of confinement in all geometries. Exotic schemes of maneuvering, processing, and engineering materials at low-dimensions are explored for new functionalities and applications.
The department deals with the latest developments in the various disciplines such as Material Science, Micro(Nano) electronics, Manufacturing of miniaturized electronic and optical devices, quantum computing, Computational Nanotechnology, Nanomechanical engineering & sensors, Nanolithography & Nanointerface engineering, and Nanomagnetism.
Professor Wang and his group are engaged in the research of magnetic nanotechnology, biosensors, spintronics, integrated inductors and information storage. They use modern thin-film growth techniques and lithography to engineer new electromagnetic materials and devices and to study their behavior at nanoscale and at very high frequencies. His group is investigating magnetic nanoparticles, high saturation soft magnetic materials, giant magnetoresistance spin valves, magnetic tunnel junctions, and spin electronic materials, with applications in cancer nanotechnology, in vitro diagnostics, rapid radiation triage, spin-based information processing, efficient energy conversion and storage, and extremely high-density magnetic recording.
The Stanford Nanocharacterization Laboratory (SNL), housed within the Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials , is being set up to provide modern facilities for the characterization of material
The Stanford Nanoelectronics Group was founded in September 2004 by Professor H.-S. Philip Wong. The group's research interests are in nanoscale science and technology, semiconductor technology, solid state devices, and electronic imaging. The group is interested in exploring new materials, novel fabrication techniques, and novel device concepts for future nanoelectronic systems.
The goal of the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility is to provide researchers with effective and efficient access to advanced nanofabrication equipment and expertise
The research at Bao's laboratory at Stanford's Department of Chemical Engineering are centered on using chemical and chemical engineering approaches towards the formation of functional nano- and microstructures with novel electronic and photonic properties.
The CCNE's goal is goal is to develop and validate nanotechnology so that one will eventually be able to predict which patients will likely respond to a specific anti-cancer therapy and to monitor their response to therapy.
The mission of the Center is to stimulate research at Stanford in the area of magnetic nanotechnology, magnetic sensing, and information storage materials, to facilitate collaboration between Stanford scientists and their industrial colleagues, to train well-rounded and highly skilled graduate students, and to develop curricular offerings in the relevant subjects.
Stanford University and IBM Corporation, with funding from the National Science Foundation, have founded the Center for Probing the Nanoscale to achieve these principal goals: To develop novel probes that dramatically improve our capability to observe, manipulate, and control nanoscale objects and phenomena; To educate the next generation of scientists and engineers regarding the theory and practice of these probes; To apply these novel probes to answer fundamental questions and to shed light on technologically relevant issues.
The research of the Dai Laboratory at Stanford interfaces with chemistry, physics, materials science and biophysics. Ongoing projects include developing new synthetic routes to ordered nanomaterial architectures; electrical, mechanical, electromechanical and electrochemical characterizations at the nanoscale; and probing the real-space structures and functions of biological molecules.
The group is interested in the theoretical and computational research of photonic crystals, micro-photonic and nano-photonic structures, as well as solid state devices.
A biophysics lab that investigates biological spatial organization on the mesoscale (10 nm - 10 microns) and the role of mechanical cues in cellular decision-making. Current research directions include tissue mechanobiology, the organization of the DNA inside the nucleus, and single-molecule measurements of transport through biological pores and channels.
The group's research is at the intersection of experimental condensed matter physics and nanoscale science and technology. Their efforts involve local probes, nanoassembly, collective phenomena, spin/charge manipulation, reduced-dimensional systems, and single quanta physics.
Single-molecule nanophotonics at Stanford University
The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) was established as an inter-disciplinary program to bring together scientists and physicians who share a common interest in developing and using state-of-the-art imaging technology and developing molecular imaging assays for studying intact biological systems.
The Stanford Nanoelectronics Group was founded in September 2004 by Professor H.-S. Philip Wong. The group's research interests are in nanoscale science and technology, semiconductor technology, solid state devices, and electronic imaging.
The objective of this project is to develop optimized nanocomposite materials for high-density H2 reversible storage applications.
Research areas: nanophotonics, quantum optics, nonlinear optics, optoelectronics
The Quantum Information Science group at Stanford University, lead by Professor Yoshihisa Yamamoto, conducts the basic research on quantum optics, semiconductor mesoscopic physics, nuclear and electron spin resonance, with emphasis on quantum information system applications.
The major research interests of the group are the design, fabrication, characterization and applications of various active nanostructures such as nanofibers, nanotubes, nanojunctions and nanotrees. The active materials currently under exploration include piezoelectric, piezoresistive or conductive, thermal electric and photovoltaic materials. The targeted applications of the various nanostructures developed are acoustic sensors for structural health monitoring, medical devices for thrombus retrieving, nanoacoustic waves for circulating cancer cell screening, chemical sensors for various gases and explosives, biosensors for stroke diagnostics, and energy scavenging involving mechanical-electric, thermoelectric, optoelectric and chemical-electric energy conversions.
The lab deals with Large-Area 3-D Nano-Patterning and Nanostructure Fabrication, Nanoscale Interfacial Phenomena, Multifunctional Superhydrophobic Surfaces, Microfluidic Self-Assembly of Nanomaterials, Nanofluidic Energy Harvesting, and Optofluidic Waveguides and Sensors.
The group is exploring nanoelectroics and nanomechatronics research areas based on low dimensional materials, including carbon nanotube, graphene and conjugated polymers.
The group is interested in studying the behavior of advanced material systems at the nanoscale. Particular material systems of interest include polymers and polymer nanocomposites, as well as thin film and piezoelectric materials of interest in MEMS applications.
The goal of the Nanotechnology Graduate Program is to create a vibrant interdisciplinary environment that provides stimulating and cross-fertilizing educational training in nanotechnology to contribute to the Institute's research excellence in related frontiers while preserving strong disciplinary fundamentals.
Part of the EU 'New Emerging Science and Technology' Programme, SIBMAR aims at high resolution structural information of individual biological molecules by employing coherent low energy electron waves.
The EU funded STREP project SUBTLE is associated with nanoelectronic devices in which quantum-confined electron channels are so closely spaced to each other that tailored feedback action exists. The approach of SUBTLE is based on the application of two effects in miniaturized electronics, which one usually tries to avoid in device design: back-action of the channel on the gate and noise induced switching.
A new institute supported by Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology
The primary goal of HINT is the development of core technologies on nanomaterials, processes and devices for human interface systems.
The goals of CINAP are to perform outstanding research in the fields of fundamental and applied physics of low-dimensional structures and to produce young scientists committed to nanophysics and nanoscience.
The group works on the synthesis of nanostructures, nano generators, sensors, LEDs, and hybrid solar cells.
SSW is a consulting and research laboratory at The University of Western Ontario, handling all aspects of material surface properties.
The Sustainable Nanotechnology Organization (SNO) is a non-profit, worldwide professional society comprised of individuals and institutions that are engaged in: Research and development of sustainable nanotechnology; Implications of nanotechnology for Environment, Health, and Safety; Advances in nanoscience, methods, protocols and metrology; Education and understanding of sustainable nanotechnology; Applications of nanotechnology for sustainability. SNO's purpose is to provide a professional society forum to advance knowledge in all aspects of sustainable nanotechnology, including both applications and implications.
SustainComp is a large scale collaborative project financed by the European Commission. The project aims at developing new types of sustainable composite materials for a wide range of applications and has the ambition to integrate today's large enterprises on the raw material and end-use sides. (e.g. pulp mills and packaging manufacturers) and small and medium sized enterprises on the composite processing side (e.g. compounders and composite manufacturers).
SustainPack is the biggest and most important packaging research project ever undertaken. The purpose of SustainPack is to establish fibre-based packaging as the dominant player in the packaging area within a decade. It will achieve this by applying nanotechnology solutions to deliver lean and added value fibre-based packaging options for users and consumers.
A joint research institute by the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS), the government of Jiangsu Province and the government of Suzhou city with a focus on nano-devices and related materials, nanobiotech and nanomedicine, nanobionics and safety of nanomaterials.
The Centre for NanoHealth (CNH) will be located within a Clinical and Biomedical research environment on Swansea?s Singleton hospital site, giving access to patients and creating a pioneering, integrated facility in which novel devices and sensors can be designed, manufactured, functionalised, tested and evaluated.
Research within the Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre is carried out in a variety of fields such as nanobiotechnology, nanomedicine, nanoparticles on surfaces or nanoscale modelling.
FOI conducts research and development directed towards the optimisation of performance, effectiveness, reliability and safety. Research in materials is focused largely on general areas such as nanotechnology.
In order to promote safe use and handling of manufactured nanomaterials, the platform aims to strengthen the communication and cooperation between different stakeholders to ensure knowledge exchange in the field of nanosafety.
The Centre for Micro-Photonics is an internationally leading Centre in biophotonics and nanophotonics.
As the materials research institute in the ETH-domain, Empa is most certainly active in nanotechnology and is generating new knowledge, new materials and new applications and is transferring this knowhow to potential users.
FIRST is a technology and cleanroom facility for advanced Micro- and Nanotechnology
The Functional Materials Laboratory (FML) is exploring the interface between materials and chemistry (catalysis) and biology (cell culture).
The Laboratory for Nanoelectronics investigates the potential of nanoscale materials in electronic devices at each point in the energy life-cycle ? collection, storage, and usage. Using a combination of experiment and theory, they study the fundamental electronic properties of materials and apply their findings to the rational design of devices that harness the novel form factors and properties provided by nano-sized materials. They focus on the design and fabrication of solid state and electrochemical devices including solar cells, batteries, and efficient LEDs
The group finds the optimal length scale for diverse materials properties and design materials accordingly.
The LSST is involved in research and teaching in numerous areas of surface science and technology, with a special focus on the areas of tribology, functional biointerfaces, biomedical interfaces, dynamic biointerfaces, surface functionalization, surface forces, and advanced surface analytical techniques.
The Applied Mechanobiology Laboratory exploits nanotechnology tools to decipher how bacteria, mammalian cells, and micro-tissues take advantage of mechanical forces to recognize and respond to material properties in their native environments.
Research in Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) at ETH Zurich is a massive undertaking, involving nearly 300 graduate students, more than 50 professors and eight departments. This involvement in materials goes back to the ETH's beginnings, and has resulted in many outstanding contributions, both in science and in applications.
Research in the group encompasses all that has to do with the study of the interaction of light and matter at the nanometer scale.
The group's research focuses on the preparation of ultra-small semiconductor structures with the aim to investigate experimentally new, unusual and unexpected physical systems. In particular they are interested in structures that operate at the crossover between classical physics and quantum physics.
The group's interest is in development of nanomanufacturing techniques for bridging nanoscience and real world applications.
The group targets manufacturing techniques for the micro and nano-scale that rely on assembly principles observed in living cells. They particularly focus on maskless techniques outside of cleanrooms, at the solid-liquid interface, and suitable for a wide range of materials.
Researching the synthesis and processing of nanoparticles.
Swiss Nano-Cube is a new interactive knowledge and education platform for micro and nanotechnology. It aims to spark interest in nanotechnology and engineering among students and young professionals. It is addressed to teachers and students of vocational schools, secondary schools as well as higher professional schools.
The Swiss Nanoscience Institute (SNI) developed from the National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) Nanoscale Science and constitutes a priority program of the University of Basel.
The initiative is meant to encourage a dialogue with the Swiss nanotechnology community with a focus on commercialization.
The University of Sydney has recently completed construction of the Sydney Nanoscience Hub - one of the most advanced research and teaching facilities globally in the field of nanoscience.
The mission of the TASC-INFM National Laboratory is twofold: 1) It serves as a national resource for the solid state physics materials science, and synchrotron radiation spectroscopy communities, and 2) it implements a number of advanced in-house research programs including growth and elaboration of new materials and nanostructures.
The group works in mostly three areas: nanomaterials, nanophysics and nanophotonics
29 departments and junior research groups from different faculties outline the scientific Institute for Micro- and Nanotechnologies (IMN) which is formed with the aim to collaboratively perform research and training in an interdisciplinary manner in the sectors of materials research, the patterning of micro- and nanostructures, upto the realization of complete devices and systems for industrial applications.
MacroNano®is a Centre for Innovation Competence within the scope of the BMBF-Innovation Initiative "Unternehmen Region", funded for 5 years by the BMBF and supported by the Thuringian Ministry of Culture. MacroNano is resident at the Technical University of Ilmenau, and cuts into two Junior Research Groups: "Microfluidics and Biosensors" and "Functionalised Peripherics".
Methodologies leading toward control of matter at the nanoscale. For top-down fabrication methods like lithography, writing, or stamping are used to define the desired features. The bottom-up techniques exploit self-processes for ordering of supramolecular or solid state architectures from the atomic to the mesosopic scale.
The Centre for Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials at the Technical University Munich is devoted to research, development and teaching in the area of nanoscience, nanotechnology, associated materials science and life science.
Major research topics are: Advanced Nanostructures; Quantum Devices; Transport and Interactions in Low Dimensional Systems; Optical Spectroscopy; Bio-Nanostructures; Silicon Based Spintronics.
CEN houses 7 new microscopes built by FEI ranging from a standard SEM instrument to two highly specialized Titan TEMs. The new unit represents an exciting opportunity that will allow DTU and Denmark to be at the forefront of research utilizing all forms of electron microscopy and will be available for use by both in-house and external users.
The main objective of the Danish National Research Foundation Center for Individual Nanoparticle Functionality (CINF) at DTU is to explore and understand the fundamental relations between surface morphology and reactivity on the nanometer scale.
Nano DTU covers the full spectrum from basic research to applications. Nano DTU is organized in nine reseach themes, spanding from nanobio-technology to energy technology.
DANCHIP is a national facility for producing components based on micro- and nanostructured materials for the use in research and industrial products.
MIC is the department for micro- and nanotechnology at the Technical University of Denmark.MIC's mission is to: educate scientists and engineers, conduct research and development in micro and nanotechnology, and transfer new technologies to Danish industry, through joint programmes.
The Biotechnological Centre (BIOTEC) of the Technische Universität Dresden is a unique interdisciplinary centre focussing on research and teaching in molecular bio-engineering. The BIOTEC hosts top international research groups dedicated to genomics, proteomics, biophysics, cellular machine, tissue engineering, and bioinformatics.
The new Dresden Center for Nanoanalysis (DCN) will particularly focus on '4D AMASE - 4D Advanced Materials Analysis for Science and Engineering', with the goal to become an internationally visible center of competence as well as a European user facility in the field of solid state and materials analysis.
Research areas include molecular electronics, multiscale phenomena and supramolecular (bio)aggregates.
The group is dealing with the development and the application of structure determination methods in solids down to atomic resolution. The intention is to correlate the structure with physical properties.
The center aims at providing the competitive edge in biology-inspired materials research for scientists, enterprises and public associations.
The center provides a state-of-the art environment for teaching the fundamental techniques used to fabricate new semiconductor devices. The main goal of the research and development activities is the transfer of innovative ideas from basic science to device concepts.
Supramolecular chemistry involving: Nanoglycobiology, Nano-Biotechnology, Nanostructures.
Supported equally by the Russell Berrie Foundation, the Government of Israel through TELEM, and Technion, RBNI aims at positioning the Technion and the State of Israel at the forefront of global nanotechnology research and development.
Major interests of the group are: electrospinning of functionalized nanofibers; investigation of the mechanical properties of nanostructures;fabrication of nano scaffolds/membrane; nanofluidics.
Nanoelectronics- characterization and fabrication.
Technitex is a Centre of Excellence for Technical Textiles. The new promise of technical and performance textiles is an emerging generation of products combining the latest developments in advanced flexible materials with advances in computing and communications technology, biomaterials, nanotechnology and novel process technologies such as plasma treatment.
CTC manages and performs innovative R&D projects in the fields of Aerospace, Automotive, and Energy (Nuclear and Renewable), in addition to a technological line of Advanced Materials (which is working in different reasearch lines about nanomaterials: Polymeric nanocomposites and graphene synthesis), while incorporating environmental criteria to assess the impact on the environment.
TEKNIKER is a technological center set up as a private not-for-profit foundation to help the industrial sector to increase its innovative capacity by means of generating and applying technology and knowledge in order to be more competitive. Expertise includes nanoimprint lithography for fabric engineering, vapor-phase deposition coatings, and nanostructuring of coatings.
Tel Aviv University has launched the first interdisciplinary university research institute for nanoscience and nanotechnology in Israel, with a multimillion investment. Over 40 groups actively conduct leading research in electronics, physics, chemistry, biotech and medicine, developing more than 85 specific and interdisciplinary projects.
The main focus of the group is single-molecule genomics but they have activity also in development of new optical detection schemes and novel imaging techniques. They explore genomes utilizing tools and reagents from the realm of nano-technology. The team try learning new things about these systems by zooming in on individuals - single cells, single chromosomes and single molecules.
The mission of the Tennessee Nanotech Alliance (TNA) is to create a collaborative effort across the State of Tennessee to identify the emerging opportunities and address the challenges of nanotechnology.
Terasem Movement is a not-for-profit charity endowed for the purpose of educating the public on the practicality and necessity of greatly extending human life, consistent with diversity and unity, via geoethical nanotechnology and personal cyberconsciousness.
Combining the nano research at A&M.
The group's research spans diverse fields, including materials science, chemistry, stem cells biology and additive biomanufacturing. Specifically, the lab is developing biomimetic nanomaterials with native interface tissue-like gradient in physical and chemical properties, integrating advanced micro- and nano- fabrication technologies to mimic native interface tissue architecture and directing stem cell behavior to obtain regionalized tissue constructs in vitro and in vivo.
The PNC Lab is the research group of Professor Jaime Grunlan and is interested in nanostructure and microstructure of particle-polymer systems.
The center's Nanoscale Materials and Applications has programs in nanomagnetics, inorganic nanomaterials, binano materials, and organic films nanocomposites.
The Nanomaterials Application Center coordinates, facilitates, and participates in nanoscience and nanoengineering applications and expedites commercialization of inventions.
MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms is an ambitious interdisciplinary initiative that is looking beyond the end of the Digital Revolution to ask how a functional description of a system can be embodied in, and abstracted from, a physical form.
THREADMILL is a new Marie Curie Research Training Network (RTN) devoted to cross-disciplinary training and research at the interface between Supramolecular Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, Physics, and Nanoscience.
The center is supported by school of precision instrument and optoelectronics engineering, national key laboratory of precision measurement technology and instrument, research institute of micro and nano measurement and equipment and it mainly specialize in industrialized work like micro electromechanical system, Ultra-precision micro-nano processing as well as micro and nano measurement and equipment.
The lab's main interest lies in the studies of physical and chemical phenomena that take place in nanometer-scale regions as well as the applications of such phenomena in photo-electronic devices.
Research activities at the Ohno Lab cover the areas of preparation, characterization and application of compound semiconductor quantum structures for high speed devices.
The group has been developing the methods for explicating the determinant factors of physical properties of nano-particles, thin film materials, and materials used for micro structures.
The center consists of several individual research groups and labs that deal with nano-related research.
The Samukawa Lab conducts research on ways to generate charged particles (positive and negative ions, electrons) and neutral particles (atoms/molecules) and associated acceleration technologies (including beam technologies), as well as research on particle flow and the latest bio-nano processes.
MNTC encompasses all fields from molecular level mechanism analysis to medical application. Specifically, MNTC's research focuses on functional ultra-thin polymer films (films with thickness of under 100 nm). The cooperative medical, physics, and engineering organization utilizes the features unique to the 'structure of the plane' created when polymers are formed into ultra-thin films, and applies these to medical technologies.
In the lab of Cagdas Allahverdi, the group is producing II-VI and V-VI group semiconductors whose average sizes are below 100 nm. Their aim is to create applications using these nanomaterials in the future.
An independent, nonprofit organization that serves clients in industry, government, and academia. One Research area is Nanoporous Materials: Modeling and Characterization.
This laboratory is focuses on the dynamics and kinetics of interacting biomolecules, the mechanics of protein imported to mitochondria membranes, the kinetics of molecular motors under external strain and the nanomechanical action at ribosomal complexes during translation.
For their projects, the group designs miniaturized nano-enabled sensors for the health and the environment; low power circuits that can operate at a fraction of a volt; imagers that can see the invisible terahertz band and even detect fluorescence (lifetime) that vanish in less than a nanosecond.
Work on optical sensing arrays
The key areas in micro/nanoelectronics research being pursued at Tyndall include: The fabrication and characterisation of novel nanoscale device structures on silicon;The heterogeneous integration of nanoscale materials into practical working devices of interest to the electronics industry; The integration of novel functional materials onto active silicon devices, designed to permit the delivery of added functionality for systems-on-chip (SoC) applications including on-chip power, sensing and actuation.
The center on Functional Engineered Nano Architectonics (FENA) aims to create and investigate new nano-engineered functional materials and devices, and novel structural and computational architectures for new information processing systems beyond the limits of conventional CMOS technology.
The Center for Cell Control is working on an unprecedented approach to first utilize systems control, with therapeutic intent, to determine the parameters for guiding the cell to a directed phenotype/genotype which will then be followed by in depth study, using nanoscale modalities, of the path by which this desired state is achieved. This approach will enable engineering systems that can be applied towards the regulation of a spectrum of cellular functions, such as cancer eradication, controlling viral infection onset, and stem cell differentiation.
The Nanoelectronics Research Facility is part of the Elecetrical Engineering Department at the University of California, Los Angeles.
The Photonics Laboratory at UCLA performs multi-disciplinary research and development in the fields of silicon photonics, microwave photonics, and biophotonics for biomedical and defense applications. The Lab has two complementary missions. The first is to solve critical problems faced by defense, commercial industries, and medicine through innovative approaches that enable revolutionary advances in devices or systems. The second and equally important mission is to produce creative and highly skilled scientists and engineers who will be the driving force for technological innovation in the 21st century.
Research in the group focuses around two intertwined goals. These are first, to create complex materials with nanoscale periodicity using self-organization, and second, to produce new physical properties because of that nanoscale architecture.
Vaults are components of cells that were first described in 1986. Because the particle is abundant in all cells of higher organisms and highly conserved throughout evolution, it is likely that the function of the vault is important to life. This website is designed for the educated non-scientist. It summarizes the present state of knowlege of this fascinating particle.
The Western Institute of Nanoelectronics (WIN), a National Institute of Excellence, has been organized to build on the best interdisciplinary talents in the field of nanoelectronics in the world. WIN's mission is to explore and develop advanced research devices, circuits and nanosystems with performance beyond conventional scaled CMOS.
A portfolio partnership between the Zheludev Group and the Baumberg Group at the University of Southampton.
NIBEC is a multi-disciplinary research centre which combines skills in engineering, science, informatics and medicine in order to enhance the development of devices and systems which have applications in health care.
The group is focused on the development of advanced drug delivery therapies based on polymeric micro and/or nanoparticles, and the development of novel biomaterials for nanotherapeutics.
The main purpose of our research center is to enhance the Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) and Ion Beam Modification of Materials (IBMM) techniques for their use in a broad range of fields, from Materials Science to Archaeometry or Environmental Science, areas of scientific research on which IBA techniques have already proven their power.
The research developed in Martin's group is mainly focussed to Carbon Nanostructures (Fullerenes and Carbon Nanotubes) as materials for the preparation of Photo- and Electroactive Organic Molecular Systems.
The group's research focuses on quantum properties of ultra-small semiconductor and organic structures with the aim to investigate theoretically new, unusual and unexpected phenomena. In particular they are interested in structures that operate in the quantum regime where several exciting and still unresolved puzzles await their discovery.
Research activities in the field of Surface engineering for high temperature: Study of corrosion behaviour of protective coatings at high temperature. Within this field the national and international projects that focus in developing new protective coating for the power generation and aerospace industry as well as the study of corrosion behaviour in very aggressive environments.
A research group in nanochemistry and organic synthesis in the Department of Organic Chemistry.
UNAM has several groups that develop research projects in the areas of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. These research groups have organized themselves to form REGINA.
The research group of professor Cecilia Noguez deals with the optical properties of nanostructures.
Research, development and innovation in the fields of nanoengineering, nanotechnology and nanoscience.
The Microsystems and Nanotechnology group deals with Opto- and Electro-mechanical systems, MEMS and MOEMS. Optical detection modulation with piezoelectric devices; Physical, chemical and biological sensors (optical, piezoelectric, electrochemical). Polymer deposition; Nanoparticles, nanostructures and nanodevices; Atomic Force Microscope and Electron Beam Lithography.
(Portugese language site) The group does research with nanomaterials and thinfilms.
This is a strongly multidisciplinary course open to students with different background (physics, chemistry biology, engineering, etc.). Students will learn about fundamental phenomena that are relevant at the nanoscale, approaches to the fabrication and the analysis of nanostructures, as well as advanced nanotechnology applications.
The School focuses on development and application of advanced experimental and theoretical/computational methods for the study of matter and systems at the micro and nano-scale. The program has a strongly interdisciplinary character: it ranges from physics to chemistry, biology and engineering.
The institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences (IMCN) conducts multidisciplinary research at the intersection fields of materials (starting from the atomic and molecular levels), electronics and biology. The institute studies new chemistry and physics, exploiting novel principles in nanostructured devices with new functionalities. The research deals with the synthesis, design, handling, modelling and implementation of (bio)molecules, (bio)surfaces and solid materials. The functions, properties or reactivity of these novel (nano)structures are investigated and characterized by advanced techniques, or predicted by numerical simulations.
Research areas include nanomaterials and nanosensors.
The CRN2 is active in fundamental and applied research in microelectronics, nanoelectronics, and optoelectronics.
The Laboratory of Nanotechnology, Instrumentation and Optics (LNIO) is tasked with the development of nano-optics, which addresses a number of technological, scientific and socio-economic challenges. Researchers at LNIO are working on new concepts and approaches, developing both innovative instrumentation and nanocharacterization and nanomanufacturing methods.
The main promising applications are forecast in the fields of optical interconnects in CMOS integrated circuits and optical communications, where silicon can provide low cost solutions. Strong potential also exists in the development of silicon nanostructures for biophotonics. Studies in this field have been performed for many years in this group (MINAPHOT). They mainly work on the design, the fabrication of test devices in our cleanroom and the characterization.
The SMALLab deals with Small Tech, such as BioMEMS, microfluidics, and nanobiotechnology to build various nanobiosensors and microactuators.
The REN group works on the forefront of material science and nanotechnology, including materials-by-design, synthesis and self-assembly of emerging multifunctional materials with an emphasis on novel magnetic, electronic and excitonic properties for energy-critical applications. They are committed to realizing our vision by focusing on three main thrusts: (1) Self-assembly of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons for unusual magnetic and electronic properties; (2) Two-dimensional organic materials for energy transduction; (3) Rare-earth-free high energy density nanomagnets.
The Centre for BioNano Interactions (CBNI) is a multi-disciplinary platform for Nanotoxicology and NanoMedicine. CBNI is Ireland's National Platform for BioNanoInteraction science, and draws together specialists from its Universities, Institutes and companies. They are one of the world's leading Centres of knowledge for bionanointeractions applied to the fields of nanosafety, nanobiology and nanomedicine, and we are pioneering many of the new techniques and approaches in the arena.
UCL currently hosts a wide spectrum of world-class activities in materials research, ranging from exploration of the thermodynamics of exotic metals to the force microscopy of biological tissues.
The Nanomedicine Lab's mission is to generate and disseminate fundamental knowledge in the emerging field of nanomedicine by bringing together bioengineering, pharmacology and nanotechnology and their translation to advanced, clinically-relevant therapeutics and diagnostics.
The University of Dortmund covers a wide range of research activities by different chairs in the field of micro- and nanostructures. The participating workgroups have affiliated in the research cooperation micro- and nanostructures to coordinate the activities within the university and with external partners.
CeNIDE is based on the strongly interdisciplinary research excellence in the area of Nanotechnology at the University Duisburg-Essen. This includes an exceptionally broad knowledge base in fundamental nanoscience, unique fabrication facilities for nanoscale materials in large quantities, and experience in questions of scalability and reliability.
The research group of Professor Markus Winterer.
Research in the Hirsch Group is focused among other things on fullerene based architectures and materials, chemical functionalization of new carbon-allotropes, and supramolecular aggregates based on dendritic systems.
The central nanoscience and nantechnology research facility at the university.
Research is on fundamental topics in micro- and nanometer-scale science and technology with a strong emphasis towards new materials and applications. It can be divided into three main fields: The investigation of hybrid (superconductor, ferromagnet, semiconductor) quantum structures by transport and magnetization measurements, optical analysis of correlated materials and biomaterials by Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometry as well as the investigation of quantum Hall droplets.
Recent work has focused on Linear and nonlinear optical nanoscopy; Photoemission and nonlinear optical spectroscopy of metallic quantum wells; Quantum mechanical and statistical modelling of organic and inorganic nanomaterials; Advanced spectroscopic and STM studies of surface structures and reactions.
The members of iNANO and their respective research groups have complementary research programs in the analysis and synthesis of nanomaterials. The framework of iNANO, however, fosters and strengthens interdisciplinary activities, promotes the development of new non-traditional programs, and provides unique facilities for competitive research.
Research interests include various aspects of micro- and nanomechanics, including solid mechanics (stability theory, wave propagation), mechanical engineering (structural mechanics) and material sciences (composite and nano-materials).
The Centre for Advanced Nanomaterials undertakes groundbreaking trans-disciplinary research at the forefront of materials science. The Centre provides an environment to foster, connect and harness research activities centred on the synthesis, processing and study of nanomaterials at the University of Adelaide
IPAS has been created to bring together experimental physicists, chemists, material scientists, biologists, experimentally driven theoretical scientists and medical researchers to create new sensing and measurement technologies.
The group's primary interest is the mathematical modelling of fundamental physical properties exhibited by nanoparticles and nanoparticle composite materials. In particular, they are interested in the thermal, electrical, magnetic, optical and mechanical characteristics of nanoparticles and their composites.
UAB envisions the creation of a world-class interdisciplinary research and student training center focusing on the synthesis and characterization of nanoscale materials and structures with applicability and integration into the biomedical arena that will position the Center to be at the forefront of nanotechnologies and biomaterials for human health.
The Buriak group at the University of Alberta
Specializing in surface characterization and modification, ACSES provides sample analysis capabilities for a wide range of material and process applications. With a focus on elucidating the composition and structure of thin films, the equipment set available to academic and industrial users is unmatched within an academic environment. Coupled with a dedicated staff of 3, ACSES provides all necessary onsite experitise for training and data analysis.
The focus of the group's research is to understand the fundamental process of nanoscale interfaces and use that information to develop novel instrumentation and tools which will enhance our quality of life and protect the environment. Their focus areas are nanoscale interface and molecular engineering with an emphasis on oilsands, nanobiology, and energy harvesting.
nanoBridge is a pan-Alberta funding initiative administered by the Faculty of Engineering and supported by Alberta Innovates - Technology Futures. Through a competitive application and review process, nanoBridge provides grant based funding in support of early-stage commercialization activities in microsystems and nanotechnology (MNT) to Alberta's academic, institutional and industrial communities. The primary mandate of nanoBridge is to support the continued development and generation of regional economic activity within the MNT industry.
The nanoFAB is an open access micro and nano fabrication research facility. With approximately $30,000,000 worth of micro and nano fabrication equipment and infrastructure, our instruments allow for optical mask generation, electron beam lithography, PVD, LPCVD and PECVD deposition of thin films, deep Si etch processes and micro and nano embossing. Along with a dedicated staff of 10 for training and on site technical assistance for process development we are an unparalleled Canadian academic facility for micro and nano fabrication research and development.
The Office of Environmental NanoSafety website serves several purposes and audiences: 1) This site serves as a resource to industry to inform them of the nanotechnology research capacity in Canada. 2) It contains an index of nano-companies and research groups involved in environmental health and safety research in Canada. 3) It acts as a non-governmental sources of information on environmental nanotoxicology/nanosafety issues in Canada for both interested media and the public.
Research on energy, nanomaterials, biomimetics and medicine.
The NanoLab centre of excellence consists of six research groups (EMAT, CMT, PLASMANT, AXES, DuEL, ENM) with complementary expertise in the field of nanoscience and nanomaterials. The research focuses around the themes of structural and chemical characterization by means of electron microscopy, computer simulations of the growth of nano structures formed in plasmas or by laser interaction, theoretical modulation of nano structures and the study of their optical, magnetic and superconducting properties.
Theories of the electrical and mechanical properties of nanostructures - and how to fabricate them.
Sharing the brain power of academic and corporate partners throughout the State of Arkansas, the Nanotechnology Center is a state-of-the-art, user-oriented facility focused on education, research, and economic development.
The Institute for Nanoscience and Engineering has a group of facilities that is unique among universities, including scanning tunneling microscopy, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, a focus ion beam, scanning electron microscopy, electrical and magnetic characterization, single molecule/particle spectroscopy, auger spectroscopy, X-ray, Fourrier transform infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. In addition, the institute benefits from the use of the High Performance Supercomputing Facility on campus.
Nanoscience at UA
Prof. Hugh Churchill's experimental research group combines physics, materials science, and electrical engineering to fabricate and measure nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic quantum devices.
Solid-state nanopore fabrication; Single biopolymer characterization and identification; Single biopolymer trapping and manipulation.
The mission of the Portugese Center for Research in Ceramics and Composite Materials (Ciceco) is to develop the scientific and technological knowledge necessary for the innovative production and transformation of ceramics and composite materials. Research areas include nanostructured materials.
Research in the group includes biomembranes, optical switches, nanoelectrochemistry and molecular self-assembly.
Research includes development of nanostructures of biocompatible polymers; study of polymer surfaces in 2D and 3D; Development of biosensors based on membrane receptors with electrochemical and optical detection principles. Development of biosensors based on DNA structures. Application to the development of microfluidic systems for lab-on-chip. Modelling of microfluidic systems.
The group investigates soft matter and biophysical systems from a physicochemical point of view.
The Experimental Mesoscopic Physics Group explores quantum effects in model structures ranging from lithographically defined devices down to single molecules.
'Nanoscale Science' as a National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) is a long-term interdisciplinary research effort focusing on nanoscale structures and aiming to provide new impact and ideas for the life sciences, for the sustainable use of resources, and for information and communications technologies.
Research in the group includes include liquid and amorphous materials, positron spectroscopy, Raman, magneto-Raman and terahertz spectroscopy, single molecule electronics, spintronics and superconductivity.
The Centre brings together experimental, theoretical and computational expertise in nanoscience and includes both creators and users of nanotechnologies, via the organisation of cross-departmental seminars, workshops and networking events.
Research includes: Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy; Superconducting Whiskers; Hot Electron Transistors and Crossing Vortex Lattices.
Calzaferri's research in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry deals with Luminescent molecules and quantum-sized particles in the cavities and channels of zeolites. The group develops develop highly organized dye-zeolite materials for nanosensors and photoelectronic devices.
Single Molecule BioPhysics and Systems NanoBiology
Research in the department deals with nanomembranes, chemical nanolithography, nanowires, surface studies, single polymer molecules and atoms and clusters.
The main goals of the group's work are the basic understanding of magnetism and spin dependent electronic transport in thin films and nanostructures, the development of optimized magneto- and spin electronic devices and new methods for the creation of magnetic nanopatterns.
The network brings together world class research activities across the science and engineering disciplines at the university.
This emerging area of research addresses the potentially harmful effects these materials may have on the environment.
The group focuses on producing and using novel nanostructures for photonic and healthcare devices. The nanofabrication methods vary from sophisticated clean room techniques to direct laser ablation. Research applications include wearable biosesnsors, holographics sensors, optical diffusers and biomematics.
Nanofabrication and processing: electronics, ceramics, thin-films.
The group is focused on a number of areas: nanostructuring surfaces via the integration of top-down and bottom-up methodologies, gene delivery based on polycations, nanotribology, liquid crystals and nanoscale electronics
The research targets of the Laboratory are reflected in three major research programs: Physics and applications of size-selected nanoparticles (clusters); Atomic-scale modification of surfaces with electrons and femtosecond laser light; Fabrication of nanoscale sensors and devices.
The Balzani group's research focuses on molecular engineering and molecular motors.
Micromoulding has emerged as a technique for micro-device and nano-scale surface feature manufacture, which offers all the benefits of conventional injection moulding such as high production capacity at low marginal cost.
Nanomedicine: Artificial Olfactive Systems in-vivo and specific sensors in-vitro for early diagnosis and prevention of severe diseases and for drug screening.
The BCFN is based in the new Centre for Nanoscience and Quantum Information at the University of Bristol, which is a flagship enterprise for inter- and multi-disciplinary research, with world-class facilities for Nanoscience research.
Nanophysics and Soft Matter is a large, dynamic research group, with over 45 academic staff, researchers and students. They have a diverse range of research interests, covering techniques from neutron diffraction to optical tweezers, and studying systems from novel glasses to living cells.
A a multi-disciplinary research center with nanoscience and nanotechnology research.
The group is engaged in many areas of microsystems and nanotechnology, with a particular focus on devices and systems, experimentation and fabrication. Applications of MiNa research span over many areas, including biomedical devices, nano-computing, nano-devices, communication, energy, sensors and actuators.
The research program of Prof. Hongbin Li's group is in the area of single molecule biophysical chemistry. They are interested in the mechanical properties and conformational dynamics of elastic proteins.
The University of Calgary nanoGroup is a student-led organization founded in 2013 with one central focus: to cultivate and support the nanotechnology community at the University of Calgary Campus.
The Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEIN) explores the impact of libraries of engineered nanomaterials on a range of cellular lifeforms, organisms and plants in terrestrial, fresh water and sea water environments. By being able to predict which nanomaterial physicochemical properties are potentially hazardous, the CEIN will be able to provide advice on the safe design of engineered nanomaterials from an environmental perspective.
The Micro-Nano Innovations (MiNI) Laboratory, led by Dr. Tingrui Pan, is an incubator for exploratory interdisciplinary research bridging nanoengineering and biomedicine. They endeavor to develop novel micro-nanoengineered platforms for contemporary biological applications, to deliver innovative engineered solutions to pressing medical problems, and to educate next-generation bioengineers for future healthcare.
NEAT focuses on applications in ceramic, chemical, electronic, environmental, and agricultural technology; environmental transport and transformation and resulting roles in environmental pollution and remediation; interactions with the biosphere, especially microorganisms; effects on health.
The Alivisatos Group is a research group at UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
Seung-Wuk Lee's research group uses chemical and biological approaches to create precisely defined nanomaterials, to investigate complex phenomena at their interfaces, and to develop novel, biomimetic, functional materials. Specifically, they focus on bone and its basic building blocks to study the fundamental mechanisms of bone mineralization and resorption and to develop bioinspired functional materials and devices.
ENSI, partnered with the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, brings together some of the world?s top researchers from across the fields of materials science, physics, engineering, and biology. Their investigations into nature?s ways of managing energy at the nanoscale will lead to real change in our capacity to generate, store, and use energy. Together, these researchers aim to improve the performance of existing energy technologies and develop entirely new ways of harnessing energy for the world?s growing population.
Professor Jeffrey Bokor's group at Berkeley.
The Yang research group is interested in the synthesis of new classes of materials and nanostructures, with an emphasis on developing new synthetic approaches and understanding the fundamental issues of structural assembly and growth that will enable the rational control of material composition, micro/nano-structure, property and functionality.
Xiang Zhang's research lab at UC Berkeley.
The Zettl research group in the Department of Physics at U.C. Berkeley and in the Materials Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory currently investigates electronic, magnetic and mechanical properties of nanoscale materials such as fullerenes, carbon and non-carbon nanotubes.
The group works at the intersection of physics, chemistry, biology, and materials science. They use a multidisciplinary approach to design, synthesize, and characterize biologically inspired materials for applications in unconventional electronic devices.
The mission of INRF is to develop and promote engineered nanoscale systems through research, education and outreach.
David Kisailus' lab is involved in the structure-function relationships in biomineralized tissues and the biologically inspired and mimetic synthesis of nano-scaled materials for energy-based applications.
The Bockrath research group at CalTech
Initially the Center is focusing on carbon, silicon and biology as these three areas already make compelling arguments for the power of the nanoscale world, and because these areas fall within the campus' existing expertise. The case for nanotechnology is often made by reference to biology, where processing is frequently carried out at the level of individual molecules on the nanometer length scale. This thrust for CNSE is predicated on the idea that biology is the theater in which nanotechnology will have its first successful applications. This follows from the fact that biology is the premier example of nanoscale science and engineering, and also because biology is currently the most important driver of the research enterprise.
The group's goal is to understand and exploit phenomena that arise from quantum confinement of atoms and molecules to reduced dimensions, so as to engineer new classes of electronic and electromechanical devices.
The research group of Nosang Myung.
The mission of the Nano-Device Laboratory (NDL) research group is theoretical and experimental investigation of the properties of inorganic / organic / hybrid nanostructures and development of novel electronic / optical / thermoelectric devices and circuits based on these nanostructures.
The group is developing the science base for the production, characterization and modeling of nanoparticles as well as their environmental impact and their assembly into functional nanostructures.
This new department, established July 1, 2007, will cover a broad range of topics, but focus particularly on biomedical nanotechnology, nanotechnologies for energy conversion, computational nanotechnology, and molecular and nanomaterials.
The research in Joseph Wang's group focuses on field of nanobioelectronics in which nanomaterials are applied to the analysis of biomolecules. Nanobioelectronics is a rapidly developing field aimed at integrating nano- and biomaterials with electronic transducers.
The group's research is motivated by how light interacts with matter on the nanoscale. The main research direction focuses on taking advantage of efficient light-matter interactions for applications in novel nanoscale devices and sensors. Towards that end, the group explores integrating nanoelectronic and nanomechanical effects with nanophotonic devices to achieve hybrid devices with new functionality. They also investigate unique optical properties of graphene and emerging two-dimensional direct bandgap semiconductor materials for novel sensors and devices.
UC San Diego established the Department of NanoEngineering within its Jacobs School of Engineering effective July 1, 2007. The department will cover a broad range of topics, but focus particularly on biomedical nanotechnology, nanotechnologies for energy conversion, computational nanotechnology, and molecular and nanomaterials.
The group of Prof. Zhang works on the design, synthesis, characterization and evaluation of lipid- and/or polymer-based nanostructured biomaterials. One specific interest lies in developing nanomaterials for healthcare and other medical applications, for example, drug delivery to improve or enable treatments of human diseases. In addition, they also seek to understand the fundamental sciences underlying the arenas of nanomedicine.
Studies in the Desai laboratory focus on the design, fabrication, and use of advanced micro/nano biosystems.
The Center for Nanomedicine is dedicated to developing the next generation of diagnostics, therapies, and ultimately cures for human diseases, improving the quality of life, and creating a legacy for humanity.
The Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation is part of the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) based at the University of California, Santa Barbara. This multidisciplinary research center provides a focus for rapidly expanding research, education and training in spin-based electronics and quantum computation, with an emphasis on the potential realization in coherent electronic, magnetic and photonic nanostructures.
Mission: Using microfluidic technologies, electrokinetics, and spectroscopy to develop tools for chemical detection, cellular discovery, and electronics cooling applications.
The research interest of Kaustav Banerjee's group include nanometer scale issues in CMOS VLSI as well as circuits and systems issues in emerging nanoelectronics. He is currently involved in exploring the physics, technology, and applications of carbon nanomaterials for next-generation green electronics.
The UCSB Nanofabrication Facility offers expertise in compound semiconductor-based device fabrication providing a full range of processes to the scientific and research communities.
The Cleland group pursues research in two distinct areas: 1) Quantum-limited behavior of electronic and mechanical systems, and 2) Developing tools for biophysical and biomedical applications.
The nanopore project at UC Santa Cruz has pioneered the use of ion channels for the analysis of single RNA and DNA molecules.
The center's mission is the development of optofluidic devices and their application to single particle studies in molecular biology and biomedical diagnostics.
NanoPhotonics explores how new materials can be created, in which the interaction between light and matter is fundamentally altered to produce fascinating and useful new effects.
The Centre provides open access to over 300 researchers from a variety of University Departments to the nanofabrication and characterisation facilities housed in a combination of Clean Rooms and low noise laboratories. Office space is primarily home to the Department of Engineering's Nanoscience Group.
Various research projects on nanoscience and nanotechnology.
The group has a wide interest in many aspects of electron microscopy, but particularly in high-resolution imaging, electron holography, electron tomography, energy loss imaging and spectroscopy.
Based at the Cambridge University Engineering Department, they are developing carbon nanotube technology (both multiwall and single wall) for a variety of applications which include electron guns, displays, vacuum and solid state electronic applications. The work is focussed on Si wafer-scale or glass compatible, direct growth of carbon nanotubes. The work also extends to semiconducting nanowires.
Dr. Simon Brown's group main research interest is in the properties of nanometre scale particles (called 'atomic clusters') and in developing ways of building nano-electronic devices from these clusters.
The NSTC applies multidisciplinary expertise in nanoscale science and technology to problems of regional, state, and national significance.
The Institute's mission is to translate advances in basic physics, chemistry, biology and computation into new tools to address important societal problems and, to create a research and teaching environment to enhance and transmit these capabilities from scientific generation to generation.
Nanoscience research
Recently the NanoLab has focused much of it's attention on photonic applications of rare-earth luminescence in semiconductors and glasses.
The UC Nanoworld and Smart Materials and Devices Laboratories are an interdepartmental research laboratory group which includes faculty from Mechanical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Chemistry, Aerospace Engineering and the UC Medical School. The labs develop innovative smart materials, sensors and devices by intersecting the various disciplines of science and engineering. The main concentration of research is in the Nanotechnology, Biomimetics, Composites and Smart Structures fields.
The UC Smart Structures Bio Nanotechnology Laboratory (UCSSBNL) is an interdepartmental resesearch lab which includes faculty from Mechanical Engineering, Materials Engineering, Chemistry, Aerospace Engineering and the Medical School. The lab develops innovative smart materials, sensors and devices by intersecting the various disclipines of science and engineering.
The Center for Magnetism and Magnetic Nanostructures is dedicated to the study of magnetic phenomena, particularly in ultra-small magnetic structures. The current research of the Center is concentrated on understanding and manipulating high frequency electromagnetic waves (10-80 GHz) using structured magnetic materials. This is particularly important because there are "windows" in this frequency range where electromagnetic waves can penetrate fog and smoke. These windows could allow the landing of planes in poor weather through radar guidance, for example.
The Colorado Nanofabrication laboratory (CNL) is an open user facility at the University of Colorado on the Boulder campus. Our mission is to provide expertise, facilities, infrastructure and teaming environments to enable and facilitate interdisciplinary research in microelectronics, optoelectronics, and MEMS.
The group's research is focusing on the fabrication, design and properties of ultrathin films and nanostructures. They are developing new surface chemistries for thin film growth, measuring thin film nanostructures and characterizing thin film properties.
Research areas involve Metamaterials, Optical Biochemical Sensors, Photovoltaics, Fluorescence of Photoluminescence from silver and gold nanoparticles, and Femtosecond Spectroscopy.
High performance CMOS and flash memory devices are designed for extremely high speed and high density in order to achieve large computing power and data storage in small areas at low-costs, which requires technologies enabling small-scale devices. The fabrication technology and the knowhow currently available for the electronics industry as well as many of the academic nanofabrication facilities allow reliable fabrication and characterization of electronic devices in sub-50 nm regime. The group is trying to utilize these resources to investigate the interaction of thermal processes and electronic transport at small scales.
The Center for Quantum Devices research: How to create, control, measure, and protect quantum coherence and entanglement in solid-state electronic devices are the main themes of QDev.
On the master's degree program in Nanoscience you will specialise yourself within your field of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. There is a great amount of freedom to choose between the different topics and courses, and to a wide extent it will be possible for you to draw up your own education. You will also have the chance to participate in conferences in Denmark and abroad.
The Nanocomposites and Composites group conducts research on advanced monomer and polymer systems as well as on novel polymer processing methods.
Center for Spintronics and Biodetection conducts research on the frontiers of the second-generation spintronics involving electron spin transport, pure spin currents, coherent spin dynamics, and spin-dependent noise phenomena in multilayered nanostructures consisting of ferromagnets, metals, insulators, and semiconductors. In addition, spintronic devices are also investigated as elements of sensors for biomolecules.
Research within the department spans a wide range of nanotechnology-related fields, from the synthesis and processing of nanotubes and nanoparticles to their employment in composite materials and development of multifunctional applications. Both experimental and theoretical research on processing, characterization and predictive modeling is being conducted. The Department was awarded a Nanoscale Undergraduate Education (NUE) program by the National Science Foundation to provide opportunities for undergraduate research and generate a framework for the integration of nanotechnology across the engineering curriculum.
Nanostructured Materials for Energy, Environment, and Electronics
CRANN is Ireland's first purpose-built Research Institute with a mission to advance the frontiers of nanoscience. The three major research areas are Nano-Biology of Cell Surface Interactions, Bottom-Up Fabrication and Testing of Nanoscale Integrated Devices and Magnetic Nano-Structures and Devices.
The Centre consolidates and promotes relevant activities across a number of academic departments within the University, in particular Chemistry, Physics and the School of Engineering. Much current activity is focused on the nanoscale
The Institute for Integrated Micro and Nano Systems (INMS) brings together researchers from integrated circuit design, system-on-chip design, microfabrication, micro-electro mechanical systems, micro-machining and neural computation.
The Centre for Graphene Science brings together the Universities of Exeter and Bath in internationally leading research in graphene. Our high-quality research environments and state-of-the-art equipment are bridging the gap between the scientific development and industrial application of this revolutionary new technology.
The main goal of CSGI is the preparation and study of new supramolecular 'smart' devices and colloidal systems, and the development of their different industrial applications.
LENS is presently an active member of the LASERLAB-EUROPE consortium, constituted by 18 large laser infrastructures operating in different European countries providing access to the different laser facilities to external visiting scientists with the financial support of the European Union. The research fields at LENS nowadays cover a wide spectrum of subjects, from atomic physics to photochemistry, biochemistry and biophysics, from material science to photonics, from art restoration and preservation to solid and liquid state physics.
CNBS will harness select world-class resources in nano-bio technology to produce tools and methodologies for early diagnosis of diseases and timely detection and intervention for chemical and bioterrorism threats, leading to high-value healthcare and homeland security deliverables. CNBS is one of UF's two new state-funded Centers of Excellence.
Researchers at HPMI at UF are working on nanomaterials with qualities such as exceptional strenght and ballistic properties.
The group is broadly interested in developing new chemical, physical, engineering, and biological applications related to self-assembled nanostructured materials.
The Nanoscience Institute for Medical and Engineering Technology (NIMET) is an umbrella organization that focuses and coordinates research and educational activities at the University of Florida in the fields of nanoscale science and nanotechnology.
A dedicated nanotoxicology group at UF.
The SWAMP (Structural Analysis with Advanced Materials Processing) Center in the College of Engineering at the University of Florida features interdisciplinary activities aimed at understanding, optimizing, and developing new techniques for the manufacture of advanced materials. The center is devoted to understanding and modeling fundamental properties and reliability of the materials and devices involved in micro- and nano-electronics in both Si, Ge and compound semiconductors including the III-Nitrides and InGaAs.
The group does research in the field of Experimental Solid State Physics, one of the most diverse and ? both regarding fundamental and applied science ? important fields in modern physics.
The group is mainly concerned with studying the interplay of superconductivity and magnetism in thin film systems and nanostructures.
The Adolphe Merkle Institute (AMI) is an independent competence center at the University of Fribourg that focuses on research and education in the domain of soft nanomaterials.
The Fink Group focuses on the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctional and/or hybrid particles and materials for a variety of applications, predominately in biology and medicine. The group works on a variety of interdisciplinary research projects ranging from reactor development and nanoengineering to biotechnology and surface chemistry. While addressing fundamental problems, our research efforts are also highly relevant to important societal issues such as environment and sustainability, human health and nanobiotechnology.
The Nanostructured Materials Lab is an interdisciplinary research team focused on the study and fabrication of synthetic 'smart' materials and biomaterials on the nanoscale.
Research areas include Nanoparticles and Host-Guest Material Science and Molecular Modelling in Material Science.
The James Watt Nanofabrication Centre is a new facility within Glasgow University centred on the Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering. The focus is on interdisciplinary research at the nanometre scale and the JWNC brings together many different research groups working in engineering and the physical and life sciences. The Centre has comprehensive micro and nanofabrication facilities housed within 750 m2 of cleanroom space including one of the most advanced large area high resolution electron beam lithography tools in the world.
The Nanoelectronics Research Centre provides a focus for diverse research activities within the University of Glasgow linked by a common interest in Nanoelectronics and Nanofabrication.
The lab carries out research in the underlying science of optical processes in semiconductor nanostructures, i.e., device-relevant science.
The group's research program is devoted to the investigation of the physical concepts of a subwavelength light technology (Nano-Optics), mainly based on surface plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures.
The group's research is focused on the characterization and manipulation of nanostructures, single atoms and functionalized molecules on surfaces. By using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) at different temperatures, they are imaging them with atomic and submolecular resolution while spectroscopy provides information on their electronic structure.
The research program of the Feringa group at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands is focussed on synthetic organic chemistry with a major part of the research is directed towards nanotechnology and novel functional materials, like molecular switches and motors.
Within the NanoLab NL program, the infrastructure in Groningen is designed to function as the Dutch center for bottom-up (bio)molecular electronics and functional (bio)molecular nanostructures, and for the development of nanostructures based on supramolecular interactions and molecular lithography.
The classic materials triangle concerns an integrative approach in the three aspects of structure, property and chemical composition. The Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials adds an extra dimension to this traditional view by an unconventional linkage to the field of biomolecular sciences, which includes the design aspects as well.
The Suresh lab at the School of Engineering is focused on studying the nanoscale aspects of biosystems through bio-instrumentation and bio-imaging. The group fosters interdisciplinary approach to research in studies covering diverse topics of food, biological and agricultural systems.
The research website of Prof. Robert Blick at the University of Hamburg. His research deals with nanoelectronics, nanomechanics, and bio-nano phenomena.
Their research activities are concentrated on nanometer-scale science and technology based on scanning probe methods (SPM). In particular, we investigate the fundamental relationship between nanostructure and nanophysical properties.
The Laboratory of Nano and Quantum Engineering is a research center of the University of Hannover, focussed on research in the field of nanotechnology.
Research fields include electron beam and scanning probe lithography, tunnel spectroscopy and transport experiments in Si/SiGe heterostructures.
Cluster Research Group in the department of physics at the University of Hawaii
The group of Christoph Cremer focuses on the biophysics/analysis of the nuclear nanostructure, mainly of mamalian cell nuclei. For this, a combination of biocomputing simulations and experimental approaches is used.
The primary goal of INE is to develop breakthrough technologies in energy storage and generation (solar and wind) by developing organic based nano-photonic, nano-phononic and nanomechanical composites that are manufactured by means of sophisticated material control mechanisms. This is achieved through the use of a variety of techniques including electron and optical microscopy, spectroscopy, nanofabrication and self-assembly. The ability to design, assemble and engineer nanostructures will rely predominately on understanding and controlling the interactions between the nanostructures.
A dedicated laboratory offers nanotechnology services.
The network brings together well established research groups and industrial concerns in complementary fields of precision engineering and nanometrology in the UK.
Theoretical and Computational Biophysics Group center on the structure and function of supramolecular systems in the living cell, and on the development of new algorithms and efficient computing tools for structural biology.
The group is focused on the study of energy transfer in semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs). They are interested in (1) constructing novel semiconductor nanocrystal material systems to engineer energy transfer processes, (2) developing imaging agents based on their NC constructs and (3) bandgap engineering of multilayered nanocrystalline materials.
The general goal of the Molecular & Electronic Nanostructures (M&ENS) Research Initiative at the Beckman Institute is to develop a fundamental understanding of chemical and physical processes involving structures on the nanometer scale.
CNST envisions seamless integration of the research from materials to devices to systems and applications
The FS-MRL brings together world-class faculty and students in condensed matter physics, materials chemistry, and materials science in a highly collaborative research environment.
Granick's research group at the University of Illinois conducts multi-disciplinary research on fundamental materials processes. They specialize in the field of soft materials.
The Lu group's research interests, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, are right at the interface between chemistry and biology.
Integrative Bio-Nano-Info Technology Innovation for Transformative Applications.
The lab is one of the nation's largest and most sophisticated university-based facilities for semiconductor, nanotechnology, and biotechnology research.
The group of Prof William King designs, fabricates, and uses tools for thermal and thermomechanical processing at micrometer and nanometer length scales. Their research involves the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and nanoimprint lithography for thermal and thermomechanical modification of surfaces.
The group is pioneering CAD for nanoscale machines made using DNA nanotechnology.
The Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Institute at The University of Iowa focuses on issues related to applications and implications of nanoscience and nanotechnology in environmental processes and human health, as well as the fundamental properties of nanomaterials.
Multidisciplinary research in nanoscience with state-of-the-art laboratories and clean room environment.
The REN group works on the forefront of Material Nanochemistry and Nanotechnology, including chemical design, synthesis and self-assembly of low-dimensional nanomaterials based on the bottom-up paradigm, with an emphasis on novel photonic, electronic, magnetic and excitonic properties for applications in efficient solar energy harvesting and magnetic energy storage.
The CFN (Center for Functional Nanostructures), located at the University of Karlsruhe (TH) and the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Research Center Karlsruhe), is an interdisciplinary research center dedicated to fundamental and applied research in some of the most fascinating fields in nanotechnology.
One of CINSaT's main characteristics is the broad interdisciplinary scope, participating disciplines ranging from physics, chemistry, biology and philosophy to mechanical, civil, and electrical engineering, including the Institute of Nanostructure Technology and Analytics (INA). Research of the center is accompanied by an interdisciplinary diploma course of studies Nanostructure and Molecular Science.
Within the Institute, a modern cleanroom up to class 1 exists, enabling the application of various modern nanostructure technologies, for example molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), ion beam deposition (IBD). Different other deposition technologies and etching processes in combination with optical and electron beam lithogrophy provide a key feature for the development of optoelectronic devices and nanosystem applications.
Various research topics dealing with nanocomposites, nanostructures on crystals and other nanotech.
Nanostructure production and investigation of their fundamental properties and impact on the fields of electronics, mechanics, optics, fluidics, and sensor technology.
This Centre of Excellence for Basic Research in Nanoscale Physics and Applications is a multi-disciplinary research division at Faculty of Physics and Mathematics, University of Latvia. Seven groups of the Institute are studying the hottest topics of atomic/ molecular physics and atmospheric/stellar spectroscopy and developing new optical methods/devices for industrial, environmental and medical applications.
Nanomaterials; particularly electronic, ionic, and optical.
Research done by participating members includes the mathematical and numerical modelling of MESFETs and HEMTs in Applied Mathematics, transport in amorphous Si and other disordered materials in Physics and Astronomy, the application of discotic liquid crystals to electronic and optical devices in the SOMS Centre, and FET and HBT modelling, terahertz interband quantum well lasers and electromagnetic field modelling of terahertz integrated waveguide structures in Electronic and Electrical Engineering.
The SOMS Centre is an interdisciplinary research centre where chemists, physicists, biologists and engineers seek to understand the science of molecular self-assembly and self-organisation, to engineer new functional exploitable materials and devices.
This interdisciplinary group is researching the formation, structure, dynamics and interactions of matter at the molecular and nanoscale.
For many years, the group's research theme has been the resonant interaction of electromagnetic waves, or photons, with condensed matter, consisting in most cases of organic molecules. Photons can be simply absorbed by matter, they can flip spins in a magnetic field in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), or excite the electron cloud in optical absorption experiments. However, many of the effects they look at are more complex, nonlinear. They study, for example, the effect of two frequencies on spin echoes in EPR, the emission of light at wavelengths different from that of the excitation laser (fluorescence), and the effect of spin resonance on this emission (optically detected magnetic resonance, ODMR), or phenomena involving two or more photons, such as spectral hole-burning.
Research on the investigation of novel photonic and electronic semiconductor materials and phenomena and the development of devices for key areas such as internet communication, data storage, displays, illumination, environmental monitoring and life sciences.
The group research Interests are in Semiconductor Nanocrystals and Nanowires with emphasis on Synthesis, Assembly and Device Applications in Energy Storage and Energy Conversion Applications. The group also studies nucleation and growth in both hard (metal, semiconductor) and soft (pharmaceutical) nanocrystal materials with emphasis on size, shape and crystal phase control.
Accelerating materials discovery through collocation of industry and academia, and the use of robotics and high-performing computing.
The current research themes of the SSRC cut across the disciplines of chemistry, physics, biology and materials science, and combine the efforts of both experimentalists and theoreticians. The overarching ambition of this work is to achieve nanoscale control, design and assembly of function.
The goal of the KyNN is to provide the tools you need to better collaborate and share the many resources available in the Bluegrass State.
More than 40 research scientists and engineers from diverse disciplines have come together in a new 106,000 square foot research facility on the University of Louisville's main campus. Engineers with specialties in MEMS, bioMEMS, nanotechnology, electrooptics, biomechanics, bioengineering, microfabrication, and theoretical and applied physics, work along side scientists from the College of Arts and Sciences with expertise in molecular, cellular and structural biology and medicinal and combinatorial chemistry, and with cancer and genetic researchers from the Schools of Medicine and Dentistry.
The research of the Interface Physics Group is dedicated to the exploration of new nanoscale phenomena and their application to nanotechnology.
Porous materials are omnipresent in nature: microporous materials, such as zeolite minerals, with pores of angstrom, molecular dimensions; mesoprous materials, such as cell membranes, with nanometre-sized pores; macroporous materials, such as diatom skeletons, with micron-sized pores. Synthetic analogues of such materials are prepared and studied here and find many industrial uses in for instance catalysis, water treatment, environmental clean-up, molecular separation and opto-electronics.
The goal of the centre is to create an easy-to-access-and-use, multidisciplinary workshop with extensive facilities, that allows researchers to fabricate, visualise and characterise structures and devices containing individual elements from a few microns down to 10 nm in size.
The group's research activities cover a range of topics concerned with the fundamental materials and physics issues surrounding advanced semiconductor devices, novel high speed electronic and optoelectronic devices, and advanced sensors and systems.
The Nano Engineering & Storage Technology (NEST) research group (formerly the Electronic & Information Storage Systems Research Group) has research interests in nano fabrication for data storage and advanced sensors applications and the investigation of data storage systems in general. The NEST group is housed in an integrated suite of staff offices, general-purpose laboratory space and class 100/1000 cleanrooms and is a founder member of the Manchester Centre for Mesoscience and Nanotechnology (CMN) where the ground-breaking Nobel prize winning work on Graphene by Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov was undertaken.
The Mission of the Center for Nanomedicine and Cellular Delivery (CNCD) at the University of Maryland is to create a multidisciplinary research environment that will provide expertise and foster collaborations for the design, development and translation into clinic of nanosystems for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.
The Center for Superconductivity Research has been merged with Condensed Matter Physics to create a new collaborative entity known as the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM). The CNAM is dedicated to advancing science and technology in the important areas of nanophysics and novel electronic materials.
The mission of IBBR is to leverage collective research strengths of the partnering Institutions in medicine, biosciences, technology, quantitative sciences and engineering, to develop integrated, cross-disciplinary team approaches to scientific discovery and education and to serve the expanding economic base of biosciences and technology in the state of Maryland and the Nation.
The group's research is centered on techniques for fabricating and characterizing nanometer scale structures, in directing their rapid self-assembly and in using nanometer scale structures to enhance the efficiency of devices which involve their interaction with light.
The CHM's mission is to conduct research in nanotechnology and to foster the development of new advances from laboratory innovation to manufacturable components and devices.
MassNanoTech, the research institute for nanotechnology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, coordinates research on nanoscale materials, devices and systems, collaborates with industry, advances nanotechnology commercialization, educates students, and fosters outreach activities.
The research of Rotello's group at the University of Massachusetts focuses on the area of supramolecular chemistry: the study and application of non-covalent interactions. These interactions include hydrogen bonding, aromatic stacking and other electrostatic attractions and repulsions. We are currently employing these concepts of molecular recognition to explore a wide range of important questions in areas of biology to materials chemistry.
CHN focuses on generating knowledge and innovations in the area of template-directed assembly at high-rate, high yield nanomanufacturing. CHN represents a unique center structure, with three universities -- UMass Lowell, Northeastern University, and University of New Hampshire -- forming an equal partnership.
Mission: To lead the research effort in high throughput, environmentally-friendly processing of polymeric materials, devices, and structures and integration of other materials and devices with polymers with nanoscale control; To serve as a focal point and resource for transfer of nanoscience and nanotechnology to industrial application; To facilitate educational and outreach efforts related to nanotechnology and specifically nanomanufacturing.
The mission of the Keck Nanostructures Laboratory is to provide access to material characterization equipment, technical support, training and consultation, as well as to perform a range of services for users in the area of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS), Variable Angle Spectrocopic Elliposmetry (VASE) and Optical Microscopy.
One area of the department is dedicated to nano- and bioprocess engineering.
Research activities focus on, among other things, surface modification of particles, biosensors, colloidal crystals and drug delivery systems.
Current areas of research include: quantum dots in LEDs and solar cells and biolabelling, plasmonics, energy transfer mechanisms in nanoscale systems, nanomechanics, smart functional materials, nanofabrication techniques and nanocrystal doping.
The Kopelman Laboratory at the University of Michigan is working on Autonomous Nano-Devices for Biomedical Applications
Research in the Glotzer group focuses on understanding why and how ordered structures emerge in otherwise disordered soft materials and nanoscale systems -- and how to design and control novel, functional structures from nanoscale building blocks using unconventional methods. Our tools for discovery include molecular, mesoscale, and multiscale computer simulations.
The LNF is available, on a fee basis, for use by research groups from government, industry and universities. Equipment and processes are available for research on silicon integrated circuits, MEMS, III-V compound devices, organic devices and nanoimprint technology.
The group's research deals with nanostructures and nanostructured materials. They seek to expand the science of how to synthesize these materials and engineer their fundamental properties; to create new technology to realize the related chemical, mechanical, and thermal assembly processes; and to pioneer applications which harness the unique properties of nanostructures at small and large scales.
The laboratory focuses on understanding cell function through the development and use of novel micro-, nano-, and molecular-scale technologies.
Researching single molecule biophysics.
Dealing with nanoscale thermal transport.
The MNF is one of the leading centers worldwide on micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) and microsystems. It provides facilities and processes for the integration of Si integrated circuits and MEMS with nanotechnology, with applications in biology, medical systems, chemistry, and environmental monitoring.
The Center for Nanostructure Applications is a focal point for nanotechnology at the University of Minnesota. It's a place where you will be able to find information about faculty engaged in University of Minnesota-specific information such as nano-related research and workshops, as well as announcements on nano related news, calls for proposals, conferences, and other regional and national events.
Funded through the NSF Integrative Graduate Education and Traineeship (IGERT) program
The Center for Spintronic Materials, Interfaces, and Novel Architectures (C-SPIN) is a multi-university research center that will bring together top researchers from across the nation to develop technologies for spin-based computing and memory systems. Unlike today's computers, which function on the basis of electrical charges moving across wires, the emerging spin-based computing systems will process and store information through spin, a fundamental property of electrons. Spin-based logic and memory have the potential to create computers that are smaller, faster and more energy-efficient than conventional charge-based systems. Research conducted by C-SPIN will also have an impact beyond the world of computer science through advances in materials science, chemistry, circuit design, nanotechnology, and many other fields.
An interdisciplinary facility that supports faculty and industrial research within the Institute of Technology to support education, research and industrial collaboration in microelectronics and other related research involving nanofabrication.
PTL is one of the leading centers of small particle research in the U.S.
Porous solids, nanocomposites, self-assembled frameworks.
The University of Missouri - International Institute of Nano and Molecular Medicine is a campus wide research center dedicated to the discovery and application of fundamental and translational medical science based upon previously unexplored chemistry combined with nanotechnology and the biosciences.
Focuses on advanced molecule/materials programs.
The main emphasis is on fundamental properties of nanoscale structures, particularly low-dimensional quantum systems, and their applications in novel nanodevices.
The research activities of the group deal with the structural, electronic, and optical properties of novel organic materials, such as functional nanostructures, with promising characteristics in the field of electronics, photonics, and information technology.
Synthesis, characterization, transformation, processing, and applications of polymeric and composite (nano)materials.
University of Mumbai will focus on R&D in Nanosciences and Nanotechnology leading to industry-ready technology and b) Development of human resources to implement the technology.
The group conducts research in the areas of semiconductor nanocrystals, hybrid nano-bio systems, optoelectronics of organic materials, and ultrafast dynamics in condensed matter.
Our research is centered on Nanomanipulation, Self-assembly, SPM development, NanoBioScience, Nanogeology, NanoTribology and NanoBioInformatics.
(website in French) The Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Spectroscopie Electronique (LISE) is an interdisciplinary research and teaching unit at the University of Namur. Experimental, condensed, matter physics and chemistry. Focus on synthesis and analysis of nanomaterials.
NCMN is concerned with atomic manipulation, properties affected by nanoscale dimensions, self-assembly, ordered nanoarrays, quantum dots and wires, nano-electronics, quantum computing, nanomechanics, nano-optics, molecular design, nanoelectromechanical systems, and nanobiological function and life sciences.
Established by the National Science Foundation to carry out research on new magnetic structures and materials at the nanometer scale.
The Center for Electro-Optics and Functionalized Surfaces (CEFS) is a unique comprehensive research center whose faculty, Postdocs, graduate, and undergraduate students work on problems related to light/matter interactions, as well as the functionalization of surfaces for a range of applications
The group carries out state of art research in the field of nanotechnology using lasers. They aim to develop novel techniques using lasers for various applications including surface cleaning, nanoimprinting, nano-manufacturing, building photonic devices, nano-Raman and Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy.
Professor Saraf's group studies electronic and optical phenomena in mesoscales systems to design and synthesize self-assembled (nanoscale) materials and structures for applications in molecular medicine and electronics.
Mission: To progress nanoscale opto-electronic components as the physical foundation of the unfolding information society.
The group develops novel approaches to the synthesis, processing, integration and understanding of porous, composite, and complex nanostructured materials.
CHTM's mission is one of research and education at the boundaries of two disciplines. The first, optoelectonics, unites optics and electronics, and is found in CHTM's emphasis on semiconductor laser sources, optical modulators, detectors and optical fibers. The second, microelectronics, applies semiconductor technology to the fabrication of electronic and optoelectronic devices for information and control applications.
Nanoscience at the University of New Mexico is a member of NNIN
The Centre is dedicated to developing groundbreaking technologies and providing solutions to critical global issues through interdisciplinary collaboration and engagement with national and international academic and industry partners.
The Laboratory for Dynamics and Control of Nanosystems (LDCN) is a multi-million dollar state of the art research facility dedicated to the advancement of nanotechnology through innovations in systems theory and control engineering. The main thrust of research in the Laboratory is to develop methodologies, technologies and the necessary instrumentation for fast and accurate interrogation and manipulation of matter at the nanoscale.
The mission of the Surface and Nanoscience group is to be a centre of excellence for the modelling and analysis of surfaces and nanometre scale materials.
INEX is a microsystems and nanotechnology R&D, commercialisation and manufacturing organisation.
The center's efforts are aimed at improving health by enhancing the efficacy and safety of new drugs and imaging agents through the discovery and application of innovative methods of drug delivery.
The recent breakthroughs in the DeSimone laboratories using specifically-designed materials for imprint lithography have enabled an extremely versatile and flexible method for the direct fabrication and harvesting of monodisperse, shape-specific nano-biomaterials.
The NSRG is a conglomoration of various groups studying nanoscale science primarily associated with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
The Center for Nano Science and Technology explores new device concepts and associated architectures that are enabled by novel phenomena on the nanometer scale. It catalyzes multidisciplinary research and education in nanoelectronics, molecular electronics, nano-bio and bio-fluidic microstructures, circuits, and architectures. It facilitates collaborations between participating faculty from the departments of electrical engineering, computer science and engineering, chemical engineering, chemistry and biochemistry, and physics.
The group's research focuses on chemistry of carbon nanotubes and fullerenes and development of applications for these materials. Directed assembly of functional networks from nanoscopic building blocks (nanotubes, nanoparticles, macromolecules) is at the center of the experimental activities.
The Centre offers co-ordinated nanotechnology and microscale resources for pure and applied research and teaching.
'Bottom up' approaches to nanotechnology, scanning probe microscopes, properties of fullerenes and derivatives.
CAMCOR is a full-service, comprehensive materials characterization center available to research institutions and private industry. The CAMCOR facilities provide enabling infrastructure for research in chemistry, nanoscience, materials science, bioscience, and optics.
The center is responsible for the university's strategic programme on functional materials (FUNMAT), and the activities at the Micro- and Nanotechnology laboratory (MINA-lab).
The focus of the interdisciplinary research in the NANOMO unit is on molecular level nanomaterials research, novel applications of spectroscopic and imaging techniques and in physics didactics research.
Current research topics include Chemical and Physical Properties of Colloidal or Nanoscale Metals; Hydrogen Storage in Solids; Transparent Conducting Metals; Thin Film Materials.
The group is based in the Department of Materials and studies the three main forms of sp2 carbon nanomaterials: Fullerenes, Nanotubes and Graphene. Their interest is in developing nanostructures with unique quantum properties that have potential in electronic, photonic, and spin-based technologies.
The group focuses on the optical and electronic properties of solid state nanostructures for applications such as optoelectronics devices, quantum information processing and photovoltaics.
The research interests of the Quantum Optoelectronics Group include: Time-resolved Spectroscopy of Nanostructures; Quantum Optics; Wide Bandgap Semiconductors; Quantum Hall effect; Near-field Optical Microscopy; Photonic Bandgap Materials; High Tc Superconductors.
CIGA's mission is making researches on ethical and social implications of nanotechnology; analysing the frameworks of legal regulation of new technologies and namely of nanotechnologies; promoting interdiciplinary exchanges on these topics; improving the public debate on implications of new technologies.
The center addresses fundamental principles of molecular function at interfaces and consequences to society.
The Krishna P. Singh Center for Nanotechnology integrates state-of-the-art nanocharacterization, nanofabrication, and property measurement facilities at the University of Pennsylvania. The Center houses several multi-user experimental laboratories critical to advanced research and development.
The Institute of NanoScience and Engineering is an integrated, multidisciplinary organization that brings coherence to the University's research efforts and resources in the fields of nanoscale science and engineering.
Research interests of this group are in areas of molecular recognition at nanoscale and nanotechnology enabled chemical and biological sensing.
IFIMUP carries out research over a wide range of topics focused on the innovative physical properties of materials at different scales, boosting the development of new technologies in order to contribute to solve today's Grand Challenges.
The research topics of the Center are: Nanoscale Dielectrics for Super Capacitors, Nanostructured Materials for Flat Panel Displays and Nanoscale Materials for Regenerative Power Systems.
The unique capabilities of the AIBN come from merging the skills of the engineer, chemist, biologist and computational scientist to conduct a world-class research program in nano-scale science, technology and engineering, technology transfer and commercialization.
An interdisciplinary research centre focussing on cutting-edge research in the area of molecular scale computations. This involves a range of important application-based modelling in targeted areas of biological science, materials science, nanotechnology and environmental science as well as a world-leading program in the development of new molecular theory and computational methodologies.
CMM is an interdisciplinary research, teaching and service centre which also plays an integral role within the science programs of The University of Queensland.
The group's research focuses on quantum atom optics, in particular, Bose-Einstein condensates.
The group aims to develop a technology for the self-assembled growth of novel nanostructures based on colloidal quantum dots.
The current research focus is the synthesis and characterisation of nanomaterials in the three key areas of energy, environment and health.
The group focuses on the formation of novel materials and devices for medical and diagnostic needs.
The objective of the team is to study the physical and chemical properties of single adsorbates and adsorbate structures on insulating films on the atomic length scale.
Project areas include: Nanostructured materials for biological sensing; Nanoporous membranes; Nanoparticle-based drug delivery; Imaging, transport, and toxicity properties of semiconductor nanocrystals; Nanobiomechanics
Includes a research focus on near-field optical spectroscopy, nano-lithography, nano-inspection.
The group's research goal is a complete understanding of the fundamental properties of materials with a size in between individual molecules and the bulk. Currently, their investigations are focused on fundamental studies of carbon nanotubes and semiconductor nanocrystals, and the integration of these materials into both novel non-linear optical devices and biological sensors.
The group's research is about understanding the behavior of materials on the basis of their chemical structure and its effects on large length and timescales. For this reason, they develop and apply simulation methods and theory to study polymeric materials, nanomaterials and more in general soft matter.
Research in Prof. Deng's group is highly interdisciplinary, covering analytical chemistry, bio-nanotechnology, and electrochemistry. The group is working on constructing electrochemistry-based sensors for high sensitivity and easy detection of biomolecules (DNA and proteins, in particular). They are also interested in using bio-inspired processes and electrochemical approaches for the development of new tools towards nanotechnological applications.
NanoLAB is a center of activities in Nanoscale Science and Engineering within the Department of Engineering Materials at the University of Sheffield. They are dealing with Nanomanipulation in confined spaces (e.g. SEM and TEM), as well as the processing, structuring and characterisation of various nanomaterials.
The U. of Sheffield's new campus includes two prestigious new centres, the Kroto Research Institute, and the Nanoscience and Technology Centre.
A nanotechnology research program 'Nanorobotics - technologies for simultaneous multidimensional imaging and manipulation of nanoobjects' has been established by a large grant from the RCUK Basic Technology research program. The program is a collaboration between 3 University of Sheffield departments (Engineering Materials, Electrical and Electronic Engineering & Clinical Dentistry), together with researchers at Sheffield Hallam University and the University of Nottingham.
Various nanoscale research such as nanophotonics, nanocomposites, modelling of electronic and opto-electronic properties of nanostructures, nanomechanical systems and soft nanotechnology.
The research mission of the institute is to explore how chemical processes work on a microscopic scale, to develop novel methods and systems for micro and nanochemistry, and to apply this knowledge to develop novel intelligent microsystem devices, e.g. for lab-on-chip technology.
The Future Industries Institute (FII) was established in 2015 bringing together the research activities of the established Ian Wark Research Institute (IWRI), Mawson Institute (MI) and Centre for Environmental Risk Assessment and Remediation (CERAR). The FII focuses on four research strands: Minerals and Resources Engineering; Energy and Advanced Manufacturing; Environmental Science and Engineering; Bioengineering and Nanomedicine.
Xiaodong Li's lab at USC.
The group's overall research objective focuses on the development of hierarchically structured nanomaterials to study cell-cell interactions and the cooperative response of cells to extracellular matrixes.
The USC NanoCenter is the University's focal point for science and engineering studies of nanometer-scale structures, their unique properties, and their integration into functional units.
The NNRC is a university-wide user fabrication and metrology center providing state-of-the-art equipment, professional support personnel and infrastructure to enable multidisciplinary research in nanomaterials and nanomanufacturing methods related to fundamental materials science, sensors, actuators, electronics, bio-systems, medical products, optics and integrated nanoscale systems.
Areas of research include: Nanotechnology and Nanoelectronics, Nanophotonics (photonic crystals and integrated photonics), Quantum Technology and electronic devices, Micro and Nanoelectromechanical Systems (MEMS, microsensors and actuators), Bioelectronics and Lab on a Chip (Microfluidics and Nanofluidics), RF system design (ARTIC).
The Madhukar Group's research has revolved around electronic response (electrical and optical) of synthesized materials and structures in reduced (two, one, and zero) dimensions and their potential use in electronic and optoelectronic devices for information sensing, processing, imaging and computing technologies. The emphasis for some time has been on three dimensionally confined (i.e. zero dimensional) nanostructures called quantum dots and the scope in recent years has expanded to include biochemical materials (peptides, proteins) and hybrid semiconductor-biomolecular nanostructures for biomedical applications, particularly neural prostheses.
The Nano site serves all activities around nanoscience, nanotechnology and nanobusiness at the University of Southern Denmark. It is separated into two platforms: NanoBIC for activities related to nanobioscience and Nanotek related to nanotechnology.
The mission of NanoSYD is to establish nanotechnology in the region of Southern Denmark around new and existing focus areas and niche competences and to bridge basic science and technology along micro- and nanotechnologies.
The vision of BioNEC is to revolutionize bottom-up nanoscale engineering by integrating state-of-the-art lipid-, peptide- and carbohydrate chemistry with nucleic acid based self-assembly. The group will design and synthesize building blocks for controlled assembly of unique and functional nanostructures in solution and on surfaces. Within BioNEC, the assembled nanostructures will be explored to solve concrete scientific challenges relating to synthetic chemistry and biological recognition processes.
Various centers and research groups that are dealing with nanoscale polymer research.
Banhart's group at the University of Strasbourg focusses on carbon nanostructures and irradiation effects.
Nanometrology, nucleic acid chemistry and the use chemical manipulation to produce new methods of bioanalysis for collaborative projects involving SERRS, microfl uidics and enzyme monitoring by SERRS.
The group has broad interests in the interaction of optical, electric, and magnetic fields with matter at small length scales. They work on new 3-D fabrication methods, self-assembly, actuation, and propulsion. They have observed a number of fundamental effects and are developing new experimental techniques and instruments.
The focus of our research is to synthesize molecules whose ability to selectively recognize biomolecular targets is improved over that of unmodified biomolecules and to employ this capability to develop new functional entities. The molecular recognition phenomena of interest include the recognition of transition states, i.e. the generation of new biomimetic catalysts.
The Advanced Technology Institute is an interdisciplinary research centre dedicated to advancing next-generation electronic and photonic device technologies.
Research within the group can be broken largely into four themes; Nanotechnology (STM, FIB), Nanobiology, Carbon Based Electronics, Microwave Electronics and Devices and Large Area Electronics and Photonics.
The university's Institute for Nanoscale Technology has two major research programs, applying Nanotechnology to the areas of Biomedical Nano-materials and Devices and to Energy Efficient Nano-materials and Devices.
The group's mission is to develop novel semiconductor materials and devices to address a few issues facing today's semiconductor industry, and more generally, our society. Research focuses on semiconductor surfaces, interfaces, and thin films.
Research at the lab involves the fabrication, characterization and applications of novel magnetic nanostructures, including multilayer films, nanorods, nanodisks and nanotubes.
Nano-Bio-Physics is a new and interdisciplinary program being developed at UTA Physics department. The goal is to develop a strong research and education program among nanotechnology, biotechnology and Physics.
The Nanotechnology Research & Teaching Facility is an interdisciplinary resource open to scientists within and outside of the University. Research activities are conducted through mutually-beneficial associations of chemistry, electrical engineering, mechanical and aerospace engineering, materials science and physics faculty, graduate students and research assistants at UTA, as well as collaborative efforts with investigators at other universities and in the private sector.
The University of Texas at Arlington is home to the preeminent university-based nanotechnology research, development and teaching facility in North Texas.
Research activities in the lab are concerned with basic and applied processing-structure-property relationship with emphasis on nanotechnology and small-scale materials (nano materials, surface treatments and layers, thin films, coatings, materials for MEMS and NEMS and nano devices).
Research activities at the lab are concerned with basic and applied processing-structure-property relationship with emphasis on nanotechnology and small-scale materials (nano materials, surface treatments and layers, thin films, coatings, materials for MEMS and NEMS and nano devices).
The Center for Nano- and Molecular Science and Technology (CNM), founded in October 2000, is a multidisciplinary research center within the Texas Materials Institute (TMI). The Center's mission is to foster research, education, and outreach in nanotechnology at the University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin).
The group's esearch interests span over a broad range of technical areas, including applied electromagnetics, nano-optics and nanophotonics, microwave, THz, infrared, optical and acoustic metamaterials and metasurfaces, plasmonics, nonlinearities and nonreciprocity, cloaking and scattering, acoustics, optical nanocircuits and nanoantennas.
A member of the National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network (NNIN).
The group is exploring the growth and electronic properties of quantum confined systems, such as semiconductor nanowires and graphene, for novel high speed, low power electronic devices. They are interested in band engineered Ge-SiGe core-shell nanowires and field-effect transistors, spin transport in germanium nanowires, and the electronic properties of graphene bilayers.
Prof. Fan's research program focuses on manufacturing, manipulation, robotization, and assembly of micro/nanostructured materials via understanding and exploiting fundamental materials science, physics, and chemistry. The applications include micro/nanorobotics, stimulus responsive devices, biochemical sensing, single-cell biocue delivery, flexible three-dimensional (3D) porous catalyts, solar steaming for water treatment, and self-powered systems.
The lab's research is focused on the design and implementation of processes and equipment to manufacture nanoscale materials and devices. The focus is on three areas: 1) develop new assembly methods to better integrate nanomaterials into micro/macroscale devices; 2) increase manufacturability of nanoscale systems through improved device design; and 3) improve quality and throughput of nanoscale device manufacturing through the design and fabrication of novel nanomanufacturing equipment and processes.
The lab's research focuses on exploring and exploiting nanomaterials/structures in biomedical applications. A main interest lies in applying advanced nanoelectronic devices to various neural systems.
The Ruoff group is located in the department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Texas. Major interests are: Synthesis and properties of nanostructures including CNTs and graphene; Energy and the Environment; Preparation and properties of composites; Nanomanipulation and nanorobotics; Instrument development and technology transition; New tools and methods for the biomedical sciences.
SWAN is one of the three centers created in 2006 by the Semiconductor Research Corporation Nanoelectronics Research Initiative ( SRC-NRI) to find a replacement to conventional metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors. SRC-NRI is a consortium of TI, Freescale, AMD, MICRON, Intel and IBM.
Director of the NanoTech Institute of the University of Texas at Dallas.
The Micro/Nano Devices and Systems Lab focuses on developing tools and devices which operate on a very small scale.
The research group of Walter Hu focuses on integrating nanoscale elements of electronics, chemistry, and biology. Such nano-bio-engineering fusion may provide rare opportunities to explore new science and applications.
Guided by theory and enabled by synthesis, the NanoTech Institute develops new science and technology exploiting the nanoscale.
Established by a research development grant from SHEFC, the Thin Film Centre aims to act as a centre of excellence in Scotland for the development of deposition processes for thin films, the design and fabrication of thin film products, the characterisation of thin films and the dissemination of information about the applications of thin films.
The group's work deals with quantum transport properties of low-dimensional, nano-structured and disordered carbon systems.
The laboratory for supramolecular and macromolecular chemistries and materials sciences.
Among other areas, research in the Nakamura lab deals with the nanoscience of tailor-made cluster molecules in biology.
NCRC was established at University of Tokyo for the purpose of realizing core technologies for the development of the ubiquitous information devices based on nanotechnologies, and is aiming at becoming one of the Center of Excellence (COE) in the world of advanced nano-photonics and electronics.
Masami Hagiya's project group dealing with molecular computing.
Biomedical nanoelectronics and biocomputer chips.
The Advanced Micro and Nanosystems Laboratory's research has a strong focus on bio-oriented micro and nanosystems. The actively pursued areas are micro-nano device design and fabrication (MEMS sensors and actuators, bioMEMS, and NEMS); microrobotic biomanipulation; microstructure controls; cellular mechanobiology; nanorobotic manipulation of nanomaterials.
ECAN's mission is to provide visionary leadership in creating a solid, dynamic, multidisciplinary research and development infrastructure for Canada.
EPMG is a research group dedicated to the training of highly-qualified personnel in understanding the science and engineering of electronic materials suitable for advancing the performance of future generations of electronic and photonic devices.
The Chan research group aims to elucidate the cell's molecular dynamics by using recent developments in nanotechnology, microtechnology, and molecular engineering.
The Ozin research group at the University of Toronto
The Sargent Group at the University of Toronto applies discoveries in nanoscience towards applications relevant to our health, environment, security, and connectedness. The team unites chemistry, physics, and engineering within six experimental laboratories at the University of Toronto.
The student-run Nanoclub aims to promote nanotechnology at the University of Toronto.
The lab of Nicola Pugno, Professor of Solid and Structural Mechanics.
The Prato group at the University of Trieste conducts research on nanostructures such as organic functionalization of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes.
Research on nanoparticles in the Department of Chemical Sciences.
The MOSE laboratory deals with theory, simulation and modeling in three different areas: process simulation, material science (mesoscale modeling and simulation in the field of nano science and nanotechnology) and life science.
The group investigates photonic band gap crystals, Anderson localization and diffusion of light, random lasers and related phenomena.
MESA+ institute for nanotechnology, trains graduate students and PhD-students and conducts research in the fields of nanotechnology, microsystems, materials science and microelectronics. Unique of MESA+ is its multidisciplinary composition. Many research groups of the faculties Electrical Engineering, Mathematics, Computer Science (EEMCS) and Science and Technology (S&T) participate in the MESA+ institute.
In order to obtain a deeper insight into the behavior of nanoscale devices the group of Prof. Zandvliet studies their physical, chemical and especially electronic properties with high spatial resolution techniques. For that purpose they mainly apply Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) and Spectroscopy (SPS). Further development of SPM-based probes for electrical characterisation of nanostructures is a key part of their described research area.
(German language site) The center's objectives are technology and know-how transfer; to develop dedicated solutions and materials; to develop market-oriented innovative products by utilising the know-how of the partners
The Unit has brought together a multi-disciplinary group of staff from a range of disciplines to undertake various forms of advanced materials research, including such topics as composites, materials characterisation, sensors, biomaterials, plasma processing, metal forming, nanoscience and nanofabrication.
NIBEC represents a consolidation of eight advanced functional materials research groups, dealing with thin film material types used in electronics, photonics, nanotechnology, sensors, MEMS, optical, environmental, magnetic and bio-material devices.
The research lab of Prof. Massood Tabib-Azar at the University of Utah's Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering studies include non-volatile memory devices, microfluidics, microwave technologies for nanometrology, MEMS and NEMS, molecular electronics, and novel electronic materials (carbon nanotubes, and nano-particles) and devices.
Developing an inexpensive, scalable process for rapid production of nanosize powders.
The focus point for a variety of individual and collaborative research within various colleges and departments at the university.
CAMTEC is a research centre committed to interdisciplinary work on advanced materials and technology.
Research interests of the group is focused on quantum nanophysics with large molecules and nanoparticles: Matter-wave coherence, interference and decoherence; Quantum-enhanced molecule & cluster metrology; New trapping and cooling schemes; New molecular beam and detection methods.
Runs the Solid State Spectroscopy research group at the University of Vienna.
The research activity of the Colloid Chemistry Group is focused on the synthesis and formation mechanisms of metal, semiconductor, magnetic and hybrid nanoparticles with controlled composition, size and morphology; the creation of colloidal composites; nanostructured thin films and nanoparticle ordered arrays in two and three dimensions; the optical characterization of nanoparticles and their assemblies; and the use of metal nanoparticles as biosensors. The group is closely linked to the BioNanoPlasmonics Lab at CIC biomaGUNE.
The group's research is focussed on the synthesis, characterization and applications of nanoparticles and assemblies thereof.
Nanoscale Materials Characterization Facility ? NMCF is located in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) in the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) at the University of Virginia (UVa) is a state-of-the-art facility dedicated to microscopy and microanalysis of materials from atomic to microscopic levels.
The Institute for Nanoscale and Quantum Scientific and Technological Advanced Research (nanoSTAR) is a dedicated, multi-disciplinary team striving to advance research & development at the nanoscale. They have efforts in three main thrust areas: nano and quantum electronics, nanomedicine, and nanotechnology for energy and the environment.
The physics of quantum transport and its application in novel nanoelectronic device concepts represent main activities of the group's research. Based on monolithic designs they focus on the development of: nanoelectronic logics; single quantum dot memories; mesoscopic sensors.
The group mainly concentrates on the study of two-dimensional photonic crystals. A second research field is the integration of photonic crystals in semiconductor lasers.
As dimensions shrink to the nanometre range, and the range of applications broadens, silicon-based technology requires increasing input from the academic community and the Warwick Nano-Silicon Group is committed to playing a central role, both in the UK and on the world stage. Most of our work is in collaborative projects with partners from UK and other European universities, advanced research institutes such as IMEC and LETI, and from industry.
The Gao lab is interested in molecular diagnostic, optical labels, drug discovery and delivery.
The Institute for Nano-engineered Systems (NanoES) is an initiative of the College of Engineering. Its mission is to bring together faculty teams from across the college and the university to catalyze cutting-edge and translational research in the design, processing and integration of scalable nano-engineered devices and systems.
The NanoTech User Facility (NTUF) is available to both academic and industrial users nationwide. NTUF houses leading-edge instruments for characterization and fabrication at the micro- and nanoscales. Imaging tools include a field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) with tomography capability, a field-emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy-dispersed spectrometry, a laser scanning confocal microscope, a Raman confocal microscope, a fluorescence microscope, and two Scanning Probe Microscopes (SPMs). Fabrication tools include a fully equipped soft lithography shop and electron beam lithography capability in the SEM.
The efforts within the Lab are focused on obtaining basic understanding of nanofabrication processes and device operation, applying that knowledge to produce better models, simulators and devices.
The Quantum-Nano Centre (QNC) will be a technology incubator for the 21st Century. From Nano Structures to Quantum Information Processing, the focus of the QNC will be to develop new and practical devices that exploit the laws of quantum mechanics with applications that include computation, information, metrology and material science.
The Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (WIN) is a world-class research centre, located at the University of Waterloo (UW) in Ontario, Canada. The campus is home to world-class researchers, flagship research facilities and Canada's largest nanotechnology undergraduate engineering program with over 450 students. The overall objective is to establish WIN as a global centre of excellence for nanotechnology and its applications.
Offers the only undergraduate program specialized in nanotechnology engineering in Canada.
The group studies nanostructures, nanostructured materials and nanodevices using atomistic modelling, multiscale computational methods and theory.
Nanotechnology needs to be based on a holistic approach in which design embracing environmental issues, including toxicity, are factored in, and this is an integral part of the Centre's activities. The integrated core activities of the Centre cover nano-particles, nano-devices and nano-surfaces (based on biology and 'soft chemistry').
This research theme encompasses applications to nanotechnology with particular emphasis on medical nanotechnology, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for characterising molecular dynamics.
The research objectives of the group are to develop novel experimental (especially NMR-based) techniques and theoretical models for studying molecular association, organisation and dynamics.
The lab interested in developing 'smart' biomaterials that mimic the complex signaling environments of natural tissue development. Particular emphasis is placed on temporal and spatial control over growth factor activity, gene transfer, and mechanical stimulation. Includes research on nanostructured materials.
The Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology is a multi-institutional partnership devoted to investigating the fundamental molecular mechanisms by which nanoparticles interact with biological systems. Our goal is to use fundamental chemistry to enable the development of nanotechnology in a sustainable manner, for societal benefit. Funding for the CSN comes from the National Science Foundation Division of Chemistry through the Centers for Chemical Innovation Program.
The NSF-sponsored Materials Research Science and Engineering Center at the University of Wisconsin ? Madison (UW MRSEC) is focused on the fundamental study of the structure and properties of interfaces at the nanoscale level of atoms and molecules. It is doing so across a wide array of materials platforms, from inorganic semiconducting materials to liquid crystals with engineered defects.
Current research areas include (1) relationship among morphology, size, reactivity and stability of nano-crystals; (2) nanoporous structures and pore surface properties in geological systems; (3) geochemical reactions (with focus on sorption, desorption, precipitation, dissolution, and replacement reactions) in the nanoporous environments; and (4) self-assembled nano-structures in the earth systems.
The National Science Foundation established the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center at the University of Wisconsin - Madison to explore the self-assembly of complex materials and building blocks at the nanoscale and develop the means of communicating advances in nanotechnology to the public.
The group's research focuses on novel nanomaterial growth and nanodevice development for advanced nanoelectronic systems and energy harvesting.
Aiming to explore the science of nanomaterials having an electron or charge transfer functionality; to prepare such nanomaterials, study and develop theories for their behaviour, and exploit these new behaviours in useful applications.
The thrust of the institute's activities to date has been to develop more processable Inherently Conducting Polymers and to integrate these functional materials with other host structures with desirable mechanical properties.
Soft Materials Laboratory is a multidisciplinary research team dedicated to understanding bionanomaterials, living polymerization, carbon recovery, polyionics, and molecular energy systems; the soft condensed matter province of physical and life sciences.
The group conducts research in the following areas: Research is in the following areas: Properties of microstructured photonic materials; Electronic and optical properties of nanostructures and other systems; Computer simulation of complex processes in materials using molecular dynamics; Computational micromagnetics and nanomagnetism; Electrons in nanostructures for spin electronics and quantum computing; Molecular modelling of biological macromolecules.
The intention is to create a world-class research facility with a critical mass of workers at the University, specialising in electron microscopy AND nanolithography.
The common thread linking the group's research areas is the use of nanoporous interfaces, in a multiplicity of shapes and textures. The group is interested in methods that allow them to develop and control porous structures, and to deploy these structures on a variety of surfaces and environments; they also try to find applications in which nanoporous structures can be employed to modify the performance of different types of devices.
The three objectives of CNST are: 1) To create a center of research excellence in the field of nano science and technology 2) To establish core facilities and common labs to serve researchers in UST and other institutions in Taiwan and 3) To promote Taiwan's nanotechnology through education, research, training courses, and collaborative research with high tech industries.
Nanotechnology has both applications and implications for the environment. EPA is supporting research in this technology while evaluating its regulatory responsibility to protect the environment and human health. This site highlights EPA's research in nanotechnology and provides useful information on related research at EPA and in other organizations.
The US Food and Drug Administration regulates a wide range of products, including foods, cosmetics, drugs, devices, and veterinary products, some of which may utilize nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials.
Strategic Research Areas are: To achieve dramatic, innovative enhancements in the properties and performance of structures, materials, and devices that have controllable features on the nanometer scale.
Nanotechnology Centre (CNT) as a successor of Institute of Materials Chemistry (IMACH) was established 2/1/2007. Establishment of the CNT reflects the changes in research and development activities of the IMACH which became strongly focused on the different fields of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology. Establishment of the CNT reflects also accreditation and start of the new study program Nanotechnology at our University.
The Valencia Nanophotonics Technology Center (NTC) is a research center whose mission is to exert the leadership in Europe in the micro/nanofabrication of structures on silicon, as a key support for the development of nanotechnology and nanoscience, specially towards their applications in photonics: in the areas of optical fiber networks and systems, biophotonics, defence, security, photonic computation, etc.
The lab is focused on the creative design of energy storage platforms that be integrated into technology and/or replace fossil fuels. Central to everything they do is the development of new materials that are engineered at nanometer length scales, and developed using scalable and cost-effective approaches. This has far-reaching applications spanning aerospace systems, robotics, smart buildings, flexible electronics, and more.
The Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (VINSE) is a University institute focused on new science and technology based on nanoscale materials.
Nanotube- and Femtophysics Lab.
The research group of Cary Pint focuses on topics ranging across nanomaterials, energy storage, energy harvesting, sustainability, and water purification/desalination.
The Rosenthal group studies semiconducting nanocrystals. They are specifically interested in two applications exploiting the properties of nanocrystals: the use of nanocrystals as the light harvesting element in photovolatic devices and the use of fluorescent nanocrystals as biological probes for membrane proteins involved in neuronal signaling.
Variability-aware software for efficient computing with nanoscale devices. The Variability Expedition envisions a computing world where system components – led by proactive software – routinely monitor, predict and adapt to the variability of manufactured systems. Changing the way software interacts with hardware offers the best hope for perpetuating the fundamental gains in computing performance at lower cost of the past 40 years.
The goal of the European FP7 VascuBone project is to develop a 'tool box' for bone regeneration, which on one hand fulfils basic requirements and on the other hand is freely combinable with what is needed in the respective patient's situation. The tool box will include a variation of biocompatible biomaterials and cell types, FDA approved growth factors, material modification technologies, simulation and analytical tools like molecular imaging based in vivo diagnostics which can be combined for the specific medical need. This tool box will be used to develop translational approaches for regenerative therapies of three different types of bone defects.
Veneto Nanotech was established with the objective to build international excellence in research, to foster the application of nanotechnology, and to support the development of start-ups in the focus sector.
The MacDiarmid Institute is New Zealand's premier research organisation concerned with high quality research and research education in materials science and nanotechnology.
Villanova has strived to develop state-of-the-art nanotechnology research facilities all over campus.
The Advanced Materials Group at Virginia Tech focuses on advanced functional and supramolecular bio(nano)materials: Design, synthesis and engineering of bio-inspired, bio-sourced functional polymers, supramolecular materials, and nanocomposites; stimuli-responsive materials; biomedical materials; combining covalent and non-covalent interactions to create structured smart materials.
The Virginia Tech Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology is a multi-department, interdisciplinary research center focused on advancing nanoscale science and engineering research and education with an emphasis on sustainability. They develop nanoscale technologies and leverage these technologies to help remedy global sustainability challenges in areas such as clean air and water, waste minimization, environmental remediation, food safety, and renewable energy.
The cleanroom currently houses an array of process tools for the research and development of MEMS, nanotechnology, bio-sensing applications, photonic and microelectronic devices.. Adjacent to the cleanroom, there is another lab which houses and supports several physical vapor deposition and metrology device characterization tools. Inside the clean room there are exhausted process areas for photolithography, development/solvent, and acid/base processing.
This project assembles a collaborative team of interdisciplinary secondary science/math teachers and university scientists studying nanoscale processes and science education. As part of their collaborative effort, they hope to develop materials and resources that can be fit into secondary science or math curriculum.
This research group, directed by Professor Michael Hochella within the Department of Geosciences, works in the field of nanoscience applied to environmental geochemistry, biogeochemistry, and mineralogy.
The NCFL was created to provide researchers with the tools to work in converging disciplines at these dimensions. Established in 2007, it is an initiative of the Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science at Virginia Tech. The facility is equipped with more than $10 million in highly specialized equipment, more than half of which was made possible through funding provided by Commonwealth Research Initiative. It seeks to help researchers investigate novel phenomena and build transforming technologies that solve critical challenges.
The centre carries out cutting edge research of global standards through our dedicated faculty and students, and apply the acquired scientific knowledge towards overall improvement of human life.
Dealing with the emerging technology of nano-electronics and nano-photonics that includes the development of nanometric devices and integrated circuits, single electron and quantum dot devices, nanotubes as active devices, superconductors, and interconnecting methodologies for futuristic integrated circuit technologies.
An independent research and technology organization that is active in the field of nanosafety through characterizing exposure scenarios, evaluation of environmental and human health impact and risk assessment in support of safe nanomaterial design along the life cycle. Also interdisciplinary research dedicated to develop quantitative bionanoscience for consumer safety and nanodiagnostic applications is performed.
VTT produces research services that enhance the international competitiveness of companies, society and other customers at all stages of their innovation process. Research areas include nanobiotechnology and nanomaterials.
Wageningen BioNT at the University of Wageningen is active in the fundamental science and technology of micro- and nanosystems and their applications in food and health. The centre helps companies to utilize the opportunities of micro- and nanotechnology to improve our food and prevent health problems.
Addressing pressing issues of human society, research at the Nanotech Center is driven by outcome-based relevance in the medical fields, in alternative energy technologies, and in technologies that aid in the development of peaceful nations.
An interdisciplinary group of scientists using the tools of nanotechnology to study biology at the smallest scale. The group's goals are to learn more about the basic functions and interactions of biological molecules and to use what they find to achieve new capabilities with biomedical implications. In pursuing this goal, they bring together aspects of physics, engineering, molecular biology, and many other disciplines.
The NanoCentre focuses on: processing, modelling and characterisation of structure and properties of nanomaterials.
Backed by the establishment of Center of Excellence as a hub research center and the enhancement of research facilities, the Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering has created an environment that provides powerful support for nanoscience and nanoengineering, alongside industry-academy partnerships.
The department conducts research on nanomaterials.
The lab's research interests are fabrication, characterization, and fundamental understanding of advanced nano/micro photonic devices with outstanding optical properties.
In 2005, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) recognized Washington University School of Medicine's contribution to nanomedicine with a five-year, $16 million grant to establish the Siteman Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (SCCNE). It is one of eight such centers funded by the NCI in the United States.
The lab's research interests are focused at the intersection organic and plasmonic nanomaterials. They aim at rational integration of organic (polymeric, biological) materials and plasmonic nanostructures to realize multifunctional materials. Organic materials with responsive and self-assembling properties combined with functional plasmonic nanostructures that exhibit unique optical properties forms a powerful materials platform for a wide variety of applications including plasmonic photovoltaics, chemical and biological sensors, adaptive materials, non- or minimally-invasive bioimging and therapy.
Ivan Avrutsky's group designs, fabricates, tests, and simulates optoelectronic devices employing waveguide gratings and nanostructured materials. They study physics of light interaction with such objects. Practical applications are mostly in the areas of optical communication and optical sensors.
This website provides information on various nanoscience and nanotechnology initiatives at Wayne State University.
The Functional Nanomaterials and Electrochemistry group, under the leadership of Prof. Israel Rubinstein, focuses its research in the general area of nanochemistry, namely the preparation, study and applications of novel architectures controlled on the nanometer scale.
The group is interested in developing new molecular and nanoscale approaches to both understanding chemical and physical properties of materials (inorganic, organic and biological) as well as to the production and assembly of new materials and devices exhibiting interesting phenomena and useful applications. Their research emphasizes the role of intermolecular forces in chemistry, as the basis for both molecular recognition and molecular assembly.
The group of Dan Oron is concerned with nonlinear optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures, dynamics of multiply excited multicomponent semiconductor quantum dots, development of far-field sub-diffraction-limited imaging techniques, and nanoparticle-based nonlinear microscopy techniques.
The group is investigating chemical and physical properties of matter at the nanoscale. They are particularly interested in new approaches to the synthesis of nanocrystals: self-assembly of nanoparticles; organic nanostructures; supramolecular chemistry; chemical reactivity in confined spaces; molecular switches; and stimuli-responsive materials.
The Sub Micron Semiconductor Center is a unique facility enabling the design, material growth, fabrication, and characterization of mesoscopic systems, with dimensions ranging from 10 nm to a few micrometers.
The Western Institute of Nanoelectronics (WIN), a National Institute of Excellence, has been organized to build on the best interdisciplinary talents in the field of nanoelectronics in the world. WIN?s mission is to explore and develop advanced research devices, circuits and nanosystems with performance beyond conventional scaled CMOS.
The acquisition of the Large Chamber Scanning Electron Microscope (LC-SEM) has positioned WKU as the only university in North America with an instrument of this type. As envisioned, the NOVA Center will be a national focal point for nondestructive measurements and is crosscutting in the five priority research areas of the Commonwealth's New Economy Strategy. In particular, Materials and Advanced Manufacturing will be significantly impacted as a result of the Centers founding.
A project funded by the European Commission to encourage young women to consider studies and pursue careers in this new scientific field (providing role models and mentoring programs), attract youth to Nano, network and empower women scientists working in Nano-Science at European level, stimulate female scientists to participate in EU programmes, mobilize stakeholders in favour of gender equality in scientific research and stimulate the science-society dialog.
Research programs of the AFM Lab include mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes and photoresponse of light-activated molecules.
In BEI's seven multidisciplinary centers, scientists, engineers, and clinicians address important research challenges in several major areas of medical technology and healthcare, including bioprocessing, imaging, nanotechnology, remote diagnostics and treatment, sensing, and water quality.
Current research and education carried out in this laboratory focus upon the experimental and conceptual study of nanoscaled materials fabricated by Non-lithography process assisted with anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template.
This research group studies condensed matter systems, often in the solid state, using first principles or ab initio methods. Topics include properties of nanostructures, especially nanowires and nanotubes.
The Mark A. Reed Group at Yale University focuses on research in semiconductor nanowires and devices, quantum electron devices, transport phenomena in semiconductor heterojunction and nanostructured systems, reduced dimensionality effects, resonant tunneling transistors and circuits, novel heterojunction devices, molecular electronics, MEMS, bioMEMS, and nanotechnology.
Quantronics Laboratory (Qlab) explores the world of mesoscopic electronics. Using superconducting electrical circuits and microwave measurement techniques, the group coaxes typically classical degrees of freedom like currents and voltages into quantum mechanical behavior. The present focus is on applications to Quantum Computation.
Research in the group aims at the development of nature0inspired bio- and nanosensors for the solution of several challenging problems of today's world.
The research of the lab interfaces with condensed matter physics, materials science, and biophysics. Current research projects involve the development of synthesis and crystal growth of novel carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes and fullerenes.
The group focuses on developing the next-generation nanoparticle system in which various components are integrated to show multitasking and enhanced chemical and physical properties.
The lab deals with micro/nano master fabrication and micro/nano molding technology.
The Nano science program focuses on scientific phenomena that occur at sizes around a nanometer. The first two years of the program give the student a solid foundation in basic sciences. A strong emphasis on Physics, Chemistry and Mathematics will provide students with a unique and versatile set of theoretical skills. During the last two years students can choose one of four concentrations, namely; nano-medicine, bio-nanotechnology, nano chemistry or nanophysics.
The Nanotechnology Engineering program is an interdisciplinary program sharing a common foundation with all programs delivered at University of Science and Technology during the first year. Nanotechnology Engineering students are also introduced to Materials Science. Starting from the third year the students focus on specific areas of nano-technology: nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, nanosystems and nanoconstruction.
Zhejing California International NanoSystems Institute (ZCNI) is a first of its kind research and technology innovation platform in China established on June, 2005 at Hangzhou, Zhejiang, which is the joint effort among Zhejiang Provincial Government, Zhejiang University (ZJU), California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI), and whose mission is to accelerate the application of nanotechnology in biology, medicine, material, information technology, chemistry etc.
The focus of the Center of Functional Materials and Nanotechnology are the modification and analysis of surfaces and the development of applications in the following areas of chemistry and biology: Functional- and biomaterials; Nanotechnology; Surface analysis; Filtration technology in industrial chemistry.