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Nanotechnology Research - Universities

 

Showing results 1 - 10 of 65 of university labs in Australia:

 
The Australian Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology (AINST) is the University of Sydney's latest step in the creation of flexible, interdisciplinary institutes that are devoted to bringing the best people and infrastructure together in the support of frontier research.
The work in the laboratories is focussed on the study of fundamental atomic and molecular processes, the electronic structure of matter and their application to technological devices, and the understanding of atmospheric and astrophysical processes.
The department carries out a significant research body in nanotechnology and nanosciences.
Extensive research into the design, growth and fabrication of semiconductor and optical devices on the nanometer scale using techniques ranging from MOCVD growth to ion beam processing. Such devices by virtue of their scale, exploit quantum effects to enhance their performance. A large part of this research program focuses on quantum well lasers and detectors of importance to the telecommunications industry. They also research the nanoscale modification of bulk materials such as nanocrystals within semiconductors induced by ion irradiation.
At the Australian National University (ANU), carbon nanotubes, Boron Nitride (BN) nanotubes, nanoparticles, nanowires and other nanomaterials have been produced by using a high-energy ball milling and annealing method, which was developed by the group in 1998.
The Curtin Institute of Functional Molecules and Interfaces (Formerly the Nanochemistry Research Institute) at Curtin University is comprised of academic staff members, postdoctoral fellows, as well as PhD, Honours and 3rd project students. The research undertaken by the group ranges from government-funded fundamental research to confidential one-on-one industrial projects.
The Institute for Frontier Materials (IFM) is at the forefront of innovation in materials design and engineering research. The key research areas fall under two main themes: innovative manufacturing technologies and energy efficiency; resource and infrastructure sustainability.
Nanotechnology is a specialisation within a Bachelor of Science (Honours). This specialisation is also available within the 3 year Bachelor of Science.
Nanotechnology is a specialisation within a Bachelor of Science. This specialisation is also available within the 4 year Bachelor of Science (Honours). This degree will equip you to be a part of this new industrial revolution. You will graduate ready to start working in a variety of scientific professions and to play a leading role in the future as nanotechnology grows, matures and reveals its full potential. Nanotechnology draws on the strengths of all the basic sciences and the course will give you a strong background in these sciences. In particular, there is an emphasis on developing computational skills and an awareness of the roles and uses of computers in science and society. From Second Year you will choose to specialise in one of two areas: Biomedical Nanotechnology; Quantum Nanostructures.
The Center's mission is to apply world-class, fundamental research and knowhow to provide novel, robust solutions to the challenges facing Australia, in the general areas of energy, health and water.