Nanotechnology Research - Universities

 

Showing results 481 - 490 of 505 of university labs in USA:

 
The Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (VINSE) is a University institute focused on new science and technology based on nanoscale materials.
The research group of Cary Pint focuses on topics ranging across nanomaterials, energy storage, energy harvesting, sustainability, and water purification/desalination.
The Rosenthal group studies semiconducting nanocrystals. They are specifically interested in two applications exploiting the properties of nanocrystals: the use of nanocrystals as the light harvesting element in photovolatic devices and the use of fluorescent nanocrystals as biological probes for membrane proteins involved in neuronal signaling.
Villanova has strived to develop state-of-the-art nanotechnology research facilities all over campus.
The new program, which was developed by faculty in the VCU Departments of Chemistry and Physics, is designed to cross-train students in the physical sciences of chemistry and physics with particular focus on how the science changes at reduced dimensions. There is a potential for other departments to become more involved as the program develops.
The B.S. degree program in Nanoscience (NANO) has recently been approved. Students can declare their major in NANO starting in Spring 2015.
The Virginia Tech Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology is a multi-department, interdisciplinary research center focused on advancing nanoscale science and engineering research and education with an emphasis on sustainability. They develop nanoscale technologies and leverage these technologies to help remedy global sustainability challenges in areas such as clean air and water, waste minimization, environmental remediation, food safety, and renewable energy.
The researchers in the Future Materials Laboratory are developing and utilizing a unique set of multiscale experimental and computational methods to study the mechanical behavior of a broad range of advanced materials, at the atomistic, micro, and macroscales.
This project assembles a collaborative team of interdisciplinary secondary science/math teachers and university scientists studying nanoscale processes and science education. As part of their collaborative effort, they hope to develop materials and resources that can be fit into secondary science or math curriculum.
This research group, directed by Professor Michael Hochella within the Department of Geosciences, works in the field of nanoscience applied to environmental geochemistry, biogeochemistry, and mineralogy.