Nanotechnology Research - Universities

 

Showing results 61 - 70 of 519 of university labs in USA:

 
The Muller group is the research group of Prof. David A. Muller, a faculty member of the Applied and Engineering Physics department of Cornell University. The group's research typically centres around the investigation of the underlying physics of functional nanostructures, primarily by the application of advanced microscopic and spectroscopic techniques.
This research group aims at understanding complex phenomena at the nanoscale that are of fundamental relevance to fiber and polymer science.
This interdisciplinary materials science and engineering track provides a strong foundation for nanoscience and nanotechnology and is designed to prepare MSE majors for future interdisciplinary careers, for graduate research programs in materials science, nanotechnology, bioengineering and other disciplines.
The Spanier Group at the MesoMaterials Lab at Drexel uses variable temperature scanning probe microscopy to probe selected physical, electronic, mechanical, magnetic and optical properties of nanostructures.
A nanomaterials master's of science degree is a postgraduate degree that enables you to enhance your academic qualifications in the quickly growing field of nanomaterials to advance your career. Of the 21 non-core course credits, at least nine must be taken within the Materials Department, while the rest may be taken within the College of Engineering, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, College of Arts and Sciences, or at other colleges.
Research in the Nanomaterials Group is focused on the fundamental and applied aspects of synthesis and characterization of carbon nanomaterials (nanotubes, nanodiamond and nanoporous carbons), ceramic nanoparticles (whiskers, nanowires, etc) and composites.
The BioNanoTechnology research at the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems at Drexel University (Drexel BIOMED) is focused on bioinformatics, biosensing, bioimaging, tissue engineering, drug delivery, and neuroengineering, which are the main research thrusts of the school.
The mission of the Center for Metamaterials and Integrated Plasmonics is to continue to advance the basic understanding of electromagnetic metamaterials, exploring their capabilities and limitations across the electromagnetic spectrum. They want to develop fabrication techniques for metamaterials that may operate in various environments, with a particular emphasis on structures designed for terahertz, telecommunications and optical wavelengths.
The Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology (CEINT) is dedicated to elucidating the relationship between a vast array of nanomaterials ? from natural, to manufactured, to those produced incidentally by human activities - and their potential environmental exposure, biological effects, and ecological consequences. Headquartered at Duke University, CEINT is a collaboration between Duke, Carnegie Mellon University, Howard University, and Virginia Tech and investigators from the University of Kentucky and Stanford University.
Research topics are: Nanotubes and Nanowires; Cryogenic scanning microscopy; Self-assembled DNA templates; Nanocrystal Single-Electron Transistor