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Showing results 601 - 625 of 1988

 
Professor Bowen's research interests are centered around clusters and nanoparticles. A major objective of Dr. Bowen's research is to provide a molecule's eye view of many-body, condensed phase interactions. The study of size-specific and composition-specific clusters provides an incisive means of addressing this fundamental and longstanding problem in physical chemistry.
The Institute for Nanobiotechnology has been established at Hopkins to bring together expertise from the fields of nanotechnology, biotechnology, biology, medicine, and engineering to enable the creation of new knowledge and new technologies.
The School's Engineering Programs for Professionals offers the Nanotechnology Option with the Master of Materials Science and Engineering program. Within the option, students can pursue a concentration in nanomaterials or biotechnology.
Research in the Searson group at Johns Hopkins involves the synthesis and fabrication of nanomaterials with novel properties.
The JONAS Research Network (Joint Research Network on Advanced Materials and Systems) incorporates four European partners: the I.S.I.S. Institute at Strasbourg University, Freiburg University, and ETH Zurich - as academic partners, and BASF SE, as the industry partner. The close cooperation of three leading European universities with BASF enables all partners to extend the scientific basis and their understanding of future materials and systems.
The Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering (JSNN) has been formed through a collaboration between North Carolina A&T State University and The University of North Carolina at Greensboro. JSNN's research and educational programs focus on the emerging areas of nanoscience and nanoengineering. The strengths of the two universities in the basic sciences and in engineering make them ideal partners for this new, interdisciplinary school.
The Master of Science in Nanoengineering degree program is a research Master?s degree, featuring coursework involving engineering at the nanoscale. It is designed for students with a strong background in engineering who seek additional, specialized training in order to find industrial or government positions in fields that utilize nanotechnology. Qualified applicants will have an engineering degree and as a minimum, will have completed mathematics courses through differential equations.
The 33-hour, non-thesis MS in nanoscience follows the Professional Master of Science degree model, featuring course work in nanosciences and business and an internship to provide practical experience. It is designed for students with strong backgrounds in technical fields who seek additional specialized training to qualify them for positions in companies that work in the field of nanotechnology.
The Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering has been approved it?s Ph.D. in Nanoengineering by the UNC-GA. Program details to come stay tuned.
The Ph.D. in nanoscience requires a minimum of 60 hours and is designed to prepare students to take positions in industrial, governmental, or academic research settings by providing a solid background in nanoscience theory and experimental techniques through course work and dissertation research. Advanced elective courses in nanoscience areas ensure students will have substantial depth of understanding in their area of interest and enable them to effectively carry out advanced nanoscience research.
The Center develops a rigorous research focus on using sustainable agriculture-based nanomaterials which could lead to breakthrough discoveries in the treatment and diagnosis of animal diseases, improve food safety, as well as interface closely with the infectious disease community supporting NBAF research initiatives.
The Institute of Nanotechnology (INT) was founded in 1998 on the initiative of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and the Universities of Karlsruhe and Strasbourg. The institute aims at performing research in selected fields of nanotechnology on a worldwide accepted level.
Research topics: Metamaterials, Photonic Crystals, Optical Near-Field Spectroscopy.
The Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska Institutet is a novel initiative aimed to promote efficient integration of cutting edge technologies and medical research. In this interdisciplinary setting, a scientific environment is established with the aim to solve biological and medical problems using various kinds of nano-technological approaches.
The objective of the programme Master of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology is to provide top-quality University multidisciplinary education in nano-science as well as in the use of nano-technologies for systems and sensors at the macro-scale. Ethical and societal aspects with respect to the use of nano-science and nano-materials are also part of this curriculum. Courses are taught in English.
The Center aims to stimulate nanoscience and microsystems technology activity in Lithuania and Baltic region by participating in European and global networks, research projects and by dissemination of information.
The group conducts interdisciplinary research focused on functional oxides (thin films, nanowires, and nanoparticles) and their use in emerging electronics and energy harvesting applications. High-k oxides, ferroelectrics, thermoelectrics, and semiconducting oxides are of interest. they have active projects in use of these materials for micropower generation, energy storage, nanodevices, and large-area flexible electronics.
This lab strives to integrate advanced nanomaterials via industry standard CMOS process compatible in-house micro and nanofabrication to build nanoscale devices specially nanoelectroncis for smart living and integrated systems for sustainable future (energy, health and security applications).
The group creates new nanostructured materials by designed synthesis to provide a platform for developing novel applications. Of particular interest are nanoporous (both inorganic and polymeric) materials which are characterized by large surface area, high porosity and uniform pores of molecular dimensions, and are very useful for applications in catalysis, separation, adsorption and gas storage.
The central scientific focus of the Kavli Institute at Cornell is to ddress the major challenges and opportunities for science at the atomic and molecular scale.
iCONM strives to improve the cure rate for the global threat of refractory diseases.
The group focuses mainly on a variety of biological polymers and colloidal particles as components of thin films as coatings on planar and spherical surfaces. A special attention is given to coating of various living cells with polymer multilayers and nanoparticles (including gold, silver, magnetic and carbon nanospheres and nanotubes).
The PMNP Laboratory (Yan research group) is interested in high-accuracy, high-efficiency, resource-saving manufacturing technologies. Through micro/nanometer-scale material removal, deformation, and surface property control, new products with high added value are provided to micromechanical, optical, optoelectronic, and biomechanical applications. The group is exploring multidisciplinary R&D by interfacing with mechanical science, physics, material science and nanotechnology.
The objectives of the Kimmel center for Nanoscale Science is to encourage research in this burgeoning scientific discipline in general, and to help establish the links between molecular biology and nanoscale science, in particular.
The center is one of the seven networking national research centers across the country in nanotechnology. The mission of the center is to provide higher education and advance research and knowledge in the emerging fields of nanotechnology.
 
 
 
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