Nanotechnology Research – Universities

 

(Links listed alphabetically)

 
A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | All
 

Showing results 1 - 20 of 20 for university labs starting with G:

 
This MURI project at Georgia Tech is focused on a revolutionary new paradigm for fabricating micro/nanodevices: the synergistic use of genetic engineering, biological replication, and shape-preserving chemical conversion to generate enormous numbers of identical Genetically-Engineered Micro/nanodevices (GEMs) with tailored 3-D shapes, fine (meso-to-nanoscale) features, and chemistries.
The Mason Nanotechnology Forum has developed a Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology and Nanoscience to address the need for qualified professionals in these critical areas. The Mason NANO graduate certificate is composed of five courses (15 credit hours) focusing on two key areas of knowledge: (1) nanomaterials and nanostructures and their relation to bulk materials, and (2) methods for characterization and production of nanomaterials.
The Mason Nanotechnology Initiative opens a space for discussion and planning of activities related to nanoscience and nanotechnology within Mason. The efforts target the development of new academic programs within the university that contain a strong component of subjects in science, mathematics and engineering, which are fundamental to nanoscience and nanotechnology.
The focus of research of this group is the synthesis, study and application of solid-state inorganic materials with technologically significant magnetic, electrical, optical, electrochemical or catalytic properties. Of particular interest are nanoscale (1 - 20 nm diameter) materials.
The CNCF in the School of Materials Science and Engineering, is a multi-user facility. Its mission is to provide the Georgia Tech campus with state-of-the-art tools for performing advanced research on a variety of nanoscale materials.
COPE is a premier national research and educational resource center that creates flexible organic photonic and electronic materials and devices that serve the information technology, telecommunications, energy, and defense sectors. COPE creates the opportunity for disruptive technologies by developing new materials with emergent properties and by providing new paradigms for device design and fabrication.
Since 2001 and the invention of graphene electronics the Georgia Tech epitaxial graphene research team led by Walt de Heer and its collaborators are developing the new field of epitaxial graphene electronics.
Dr. Filler's research group works at the interface of chemical engineering and materials science, emphasizing the atomic-level engineering of nanoscale semiconductors for applications in energy conversion, electronics, and photonics.
The Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology (IEN) at Georgia Tech was established as an Interdisciplinary Research Institute (IRI) with the goals of providing a central entry point and a central organization to enable interdisciplinary E&N related training, education, and research at Georgia Tech in partnership with outside entities.
The mission of the group is to advance the science and engineering of organic and hybrid nanostructured materials and enable technological innovations for applications in communications, sensing, displays, energy efficient solid-state lighting, and power generation.
The group's research focuses on nanostructured functional materials (NanoFM), including polymer-based nanocomposites, block copolymers, polymer blends, conjugated polymers, quantum dots (rods, tetrapods, wires), magnetic nanocrystals, metallic nanocrystals, semiconductor metal oxide nanocrystals, ferroelectric nanocrystals, multiferroic nanocrystals, upconversion nanocrystals, thermoelectric nancrystals, core/shell nanocrystals, hollow nanocrystals, Janus nanocrystals, nanopores, nanotubes, hierarchically structured and assembled materials, and semiconductor organic-inorganic nanohybrids. The goal of the research is to understand the fundamentals of these nanostructured materials.
The mission of Prof. Gleb Yushin's group is to develop innovative nanotechnology-driven solutions that would facilitate a cleaner environment, decreased energy consumption, safer and healthier lives for people around the globe, and other benefits to society. The group's current focus is directed towards the synthesis of innovative nanostructured materials for supercapacitors, fuel cells and batteries.
The Xia group is pursuing cutting-edge research in three major frontiers: nanotechnology, materials chemistry, and photonic devices. Recently, the group starts to move into cell biology by harnessing the power of nanomaterials to develop novel tools for studying complex biological systems.
Zhong L. Wang's research group at Georgia Institute of Technology focuses on the fundamental science in the physical and chemical processes in nanomaterials growth, unique properties of nanosystems, novel in-situ measurement techniques, and new applications of nano-scale objects.
The Centre brings together many different research groups working in engineering and the physical and life sciences. The Centre has comprehensive micro and nanofabrication facilities including one of the most advanced large area high resolution electron beam lithography tools in the world.
This degree is for those who have an interest in chemistry and a desire to explore the frontline of science. This programme combines chemistry with green nanotechnology in order to solve a wide range of issues.
Dans le domaine porteur des micro et nanotechnologies, les 3 universités/écoles d'ingénieur Grenoble INP, Politecnico di Torino et Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) ont mis en place depuis 2004 une formation conjointe d'ingénieur/master.
A 2-year international course born of the collaboration between three European engineering institutes: Institut national polytechnique de Grenoble (France), cole polytechnique fdrale de Lausanne (Suisse) and Politecnico di Torino (Italy).
Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre is a science and engineering research centre investigating micro- and nanotechnology problems that are integral to the development of clean and intelligent systems. QMNC brings together researchers with expertise in the fundamental theory of materials, materials development, sensing, microelectronic engineering and microtechnology, across the disciplines of Physics, Chemistry, Applied Mathematics and Engineering. The QMNC has four principal research themes: 1)Sustainable energy technologies; 2) Novel devices and materials; 3) Complex systems and signals; 4)Theory and modelling
Research on fabricating and characterizing nanostructures involving individual molecules, nanoparticles, nanowires, and their arrays and assembling these nano-building blocks into electronic devices.