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Posted: March 19, 2008

Two-day event in Boston will showcase the latest in micro and nanomanufacturing

(Nanowerk News) The Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) will host the NanoManufacturing and the co-located MicroManufacturing Conference and Exhibits, April 22-23, 2008, at the Sheraton Hotel in Framingham, Massachusetts. This event will not only bring together two emerging manufacturing technologies, but also 13 of Greater Boston's brightest engineering and science university students. Their participation will mark the launch of the conference's Bright Minds Nano Program, a mentoring program which provides full conference passes to students from Boston University, MIT, Northeastern University and other schools.
The Bright Minds Program was originally designed by the Rapid Technologies and Additive Manufacturing Community and was adapted by the SME NanoManufacturing Tech Group to create interest, excitement and an appreciation for nanotechnology and applications among students.
During the course of this two-day event, the selected 13 students will have the opportunity to interact and meet industry professionals and explore how nanotechnology is transforming the way we manufacture products.
"Think of micromanufacturing as manufacturing on a very small level," explained Boris Fritz, Northrop Grumman,Integrated Systems engineer 5, Bright Minds Nano Program workgroup and SME nanomanufacturing tech group member. "Now reduce this to a microscopic level to locate and manipulate individual molecules to either create new products or increase useful functions of existing ones - that's nanotechnology. Through the Bright Minds Nano Program, it is SME's mission to teach this new technology to the next generation of innovators."
The Bright Minds Nano Program was made possible by underwriting in part by NanoInk, Inc, an emerging growth technology company specializing in nanometer-scale manufacturing and application development for the life science and semiconductor industries.
"NanoInk is proud to co-underwrite this mentoring program, which will provide these young people individual access to nanomanufacturing technology that is already transforming the way our company and the U.S. develop products," said Mike Nelson, vice president engineering, NanoInk, Inc., Bright Minds Nano Program workgroup member and event advisor.
Additional funding was generously donated by Florida Turbine Technologies (FTT), a growing high technology company located in Palm Beach County, Florida specializing in design, development, manufacturing and testing of turbo-machinery components and systems for aircraft engines, space propulsion and power generation.
Through his work as a member of the SME Nanomanufacturing tech group, Florida Power & Light Senior Design Engineer William Spanks first approached his former company FTT about funding Bright Minds Nano.
"FTT has a team of more than 150 engineers with a total of 2000 years experience. While this may seem like a limitless reserve of knowledge, they are always looking to recruit new talent. It was FTT's mission to get in on the ground floor of workforce development" said Spanks.
Through his work as a member of the SME Nanomanufacturing tech group, FTT's Senior Mechanical Design Engineer William Spanks first approached his company about funding Bright Minds Nano.
"FTT has a team of more than 150 engineers with a total of 2000 years experience. While this may seem like a limitless reserve of knowledge, some day we will need to recruit new talent. It was our personal mission to help FTT get in on the ground floor of workforce development," said Spanks.
Mr. Spanks' commitment to generation next has also made him a valued Bright Minds Nano Program workgroup member and advisor for this year's event.
"Our donation is our way of ensuring that a new crop of science and engineering leaders is well-prepared for this fast-approaching and exciting technology critical to the future of not only nano, but to all manufacturing," added Walter Marussich, a FTT senior structures engineer.
David Smith, a division manager of Foster-Miller, the SME Boston Chapter 33 chair, and member of the Bright Minds Nano Program and SME NanoManufacturing work and tech groups, expressed gratitude for both companies' contributions. "We thank NanoInk and FTT for their generosity and look forward to continuing the program for future conferences to ensure young people take an active interest in pursuing manufacturing innovation careers."
While the Bright Minds Nano Program will be a key addition to this year's event, the NanoManufacturing Conference will focus on the current and near- term applications with a highlight of future applications of nanotechnology, peer networking and information sharing and how it is transforming the way we manufacture. The Conference is co-located with the 2008 MicroManufacturing Conference & Exhibits. Whether the challenge is creating micro features on micro or macro parts, event participants will gain ideas to improve their current methods.
Attendees are also invited to take a guided tour of the Fraunhofer USA Center for Manufacturing Innovation (CMI). The world-class Center, in collaboration with Boston University, provides manufacturing solutions to industries in the United States and abroad. Nearby Boston also will provide a wealth of amenities including shops, restaurants, and historical sites.
For more information or to register, please visit www.sme.org/nanomanufacturing or www.sme.org/micro.
About SME
The Society of Manufacturing Engineers (www.sme.org) is the world's leading professional society supporting manufacturing education. Through its member programs, publications, expositions and professional development resources, SME promotes an increased awareness of manufacturing engineering and helps keep manufacturing professionals up to date on leading trends and technologies. Headquartered in Michigan, SME influences more than half a million manufacturing practitioners and executives annually. The Society has members in more than 70 countries and is supported by a network of hundreds of technical communities and chapters worldwide.
Source: SME