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Posted: August 19, 2008

New developments in microscopy to be discussed this week in Ireland

(Nanowerk News) Leaders in the field of microscopy from across Ireland will meet at Queen’s University Belfast this week to discuss exciting new developments in technology which could have a huge impact on public health.
The Microscopical Society of Ireland’s 32nd Annual Symposium takes place from 20 to 22 August in the School of Biological Sciences in the Medical Biology Centre. It aims to inform, educate and support those who use any form of microscopy in their work, whether in the field of academia or industry.
Among the speakers will be Professor Aaron Maule, a professor of Molecular Parasitology in the School of Biological Sciences at Queen’s.
Professor Maule has recently been awarded the Bueding-von Brand Award from the American Society of Parasitologists in Texas. He was praised for “his outstanding contribution and scientific discoveries in the field of novel drug target research in helminth parasites”.
His presentation on Friday will be on Bioimaging as a tool to probe worm biology.
Also speaking at the conference will be Professor Paul Verkade, from the University of Bristol, a well known expert in cryomicroscopy - a technique which combines the dynamic images of the light microscope with the high resolution of the electron microscope. When it is used with a high pressure freezing technique, it allows scientists to see intracellular processes.
Professor Versake will focus on New tools for Correlative Light Electron Microscopy.
The relationship between art and science will be investigated by Deidre Robson from St Mary’s University College in Belfast in her seminar, What’s Art Got to Do with Science? The Leonardo Effect.
The Society’s President Dr Gerry Brennan, who is based in the university's School of Biological Sciences, said: “There are some exciting developments in the field of microscopy which could have a huge impact in public health, including the development of three dimensional, ultrastructural imaging which will help interpret, more accurately, processes taking place inside the cell.
“The symposium provides an excellent forum for young researchers to present their data at a conference and we’re delighted it’s being held at Queen’s.”
Source: Queen's University Belfast