Nanotechnology Research Laboratories

 

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Showing results 401 - 425 of 1934

 
The Frontiers consortium is designed on five criteria: individual excellence in science, excellent nanotechnology infrastructure (clean room facilities), proven capability to initiate start-ups on the basis of new technology, outstanding relations with nanotechnology initiatives all over the world and, finally, a proven track record in cooperating with other members of the consortium. Frontiers consists of 192 scientists from 11 different research institutions scattered over Europe.
Pursues nanotechnology rseearch such as carbon nanotube interconnects and high-speed nanoscale devices.
The objective of the society is to create an opportunity to provide information concerning basic science and applied technology relating to nano carbon based materials such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene and to provide an opportunity for members to get together.
The objective of this EU project is the investigation and deliberate steering of supramolecular self-organization using complex molecules at well-defined substrates for the fabrication of functional nanostructures.
(Site in Spanish) The official site of the Argentinean Nanotechnology Foundation.
FUNFOX is a European Commission funded program which will demonstrate the capabilities of photonic crystals (PhC) to provide miniature and improved semiconductor optoelectronic devices needed in metropolitan core and access segments of optical networks.
The joint research project of four institutes, entitled 'FUNgraphen' and funded by the German Federal Minister of Education and Research (BMBF), will build an innovation center aiming at the development of unconventional carbon nano materials, novel flat carbon macromolecules, nanocomposites and multilayer systems. Key components are large area ultrathin single layer carbon materials (graphene) with average diameter of around 0.1 nm as new 2D carbon macromolecules produced from natural graphite.
FUNMAT is a newly established national consortium for research within functional materials and nanotechnology and has four senior partners: The University of Oslo; Norwegian University for Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim; SINTEF, Trondheim and Oslo; Institute for Energy Technology (IFE).
GALAXY - GALs interfAce for compleX digital sYstem integration. This EU project proposes to provide an integrated GALS (Globally Asynchronous, Locally Synchronous) design flow, together with novel Network-on-Chip capabilities, that will materially aid embedded system design for a significant class of problems. The project will evaluate the ability of the GALS approach to solve system integration issues and, by implementing a complex wireless communication system on an advanced 45nm CMOS process, explore the low EMI properties, inherent low-power features and robustness to process variability problems in nanoscale geometries.
(In French) This research group of the French CNRS researches the electronic structure of nanomaterials.
This MURI project at Georgia Tech is focused on a revolutionary new paradigm for fabricating micro/nanodevices: the synergistic use of genetic engineering, biological replication, and shape-preserving chemical conversion to generate enormous numbers of identical Genetically-Engineered Micro/nanodevices (GEMs) with tailored 3-D shapes, fine (meso-to-nanoscale) features, and chemistries.
The Mason Nanotechnology Forum has developed a Graduate Certificate in Nanotechnology and Nanoscience to address the need for qualified professionals in these critical areas. The Mason NANO graduate certificate is composed of five courses (15 credit hours) focusing on two key areas of knowledge: (1) nanomaterials and nanostructures and their relation to bulk materials, and (2) methods for characterization and production of nanomaterials.
The Mason Nanotechnology Initiative opens a space for discussion and planning of activities related to nanoscience and nanotechnology within Mason. The efforts target the development of new academic programs within the university that contain a strong component of subjects in science, mathematics and engineering, which are fundamental to nanoscience and nanotechnology.
The focus of research of this group is the synthesis, study and application of solid-state inorganic materials with technologically significant magnetic, electrical, optical, electrochemical or catalytic properties. Of particular interest are nanoscale (1 - 20 nm diameter) materials.
The CNCF in the School of Materials Science and Engineering, is a multi-user facility. Its mission is to provide the Georgia Tech campus with state-of-the-art tools for performing advanced research on a variety of nanoscale materials.
COPE is a premier national research and educational resource center that creates flexible organic photonic and electronic materials and devices that serve the information technology, telecommunications, energy, and defense sectors. COPE creates the opportunity for disruptive technologies by developing new materials with emergent properties and by providing new paradigms for device design and fabrication.
Since 2001 and the invention of graphene electronics the Georgia Tech epitaxial graphene research team led by Walt de Heer and its collaborators are developing the new field of epitaxial graphene electronics.
Dr. Filler's research group works at the interface of chemical engineering and materials science, emphasizing the atomic-level engineering of nanoscale semiconductors for applications in energy conversion, electronics, and photonics.
The Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology (IEN) at Georgia Tech was established as an Interdisciplinary Research Institute (IRI) with the goals of providing a central entry point and a central organization to enable interdisciplinary E&N related training, education, and research at Georgia Tech in partnership with outside entities.
The mission of the group is to advance the science and engineering of organic and hybrid nanostructured materials and enable technological innovations for applications in communications, sensing, displays, energy efficient solid-state lighting, and power generation.
The group's research focuses on nanostructured functional materials (NanoFM), including polymer-based nanocomposites, block copolymers, polymer blends, conjugated polymers, quantum dots (rods, tetrapods, wires), magnetic nanocrystals, metallic nanocrystals, semiconductor metal oxide nanocrystals, ferroelectric nanocrystals, multiferroic nanocrystals, upconversion nanocrystals, thermoelectric nancrystals, core/shell nanocrystals, hollow nanocrystals, Janus nanocrystals, nanopores, nanotubes, hierarchically structured and assembled materials, and semiconductor organic-inorganic nanohybrids. The goal of the research is to understand the fundamentals of these nanostructured materials.
The mission of Prof. Gleb Yushin's group is to develop innovative nanotechnology-driven solutions that would facilitate a cleaner environment, decreased energy consumption, safer and healthier lives for people around the globe, and other benefits to society. The group's current focus is directed towards the synthesis of innovative nanostructured materials for supercapacitors, fuel cells and batteries.
The Xia group is pursuing cutting-edge research in three major frontiers: nanotechnology, materials chemistry, and photonic devices. Recently, the group starts to move into cell biology by harnessing the power of nanomaterials to develop novel tools for studying complex biological systems.
Zhong L. Wang's research group at Georgia Institute of Technology focuses on the fundamental science in the physical and chemical processes in nanomaterials growth, unique properties of nanosystems, novel in-situ measurement techniques, and new applications of nano-scale objects.
Initiated and coordinated by BAuA, UBA (Federal Environment Agency), BfR (Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) and BAuA have developed a joint research strategy, that addresses especially health and environmental risks of engineered nanoparticles. The draft proposes 25 different projects on nanotechnology.