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Nanotechnology General News

The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Troublesome green algae serve as nanocoating substrate in record-setting battery

Unwanted blooms of Cladophora algae throughout the Baltic and in other parts of the world are not entirely without a positive side. A group of researchers at the Angstrom Laboratory at Uppsala University have discovered that the distinctive cellulose nanostructure of these algae can serve as an effective coating substrate for use in environmentally friendly batteries.

Posted: Sep 10th, 2009

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RNAs taking center stage

RNAs, serving as a mere intermediary between DNA and proteins, were long regarded as a poor relation by researchers, attracting little interest. However, following the discovery of small RNAs known as microRNAs, they have increasingly been moving into the limelight.

Posted: Sep 10th, 2009

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Fast transistors for a digital world

Our society is insatiable as far as the transfer of data is concerned. Consequently, increasingly faster and cheaper transistors are being developed. In row in recent months, researchers from ETH Zurich have now broken the world record for the switching speed of nitride-based transistors that use silicon as a substrate several times.

Posted: Sep 10th, 2009

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How to control your quantum pulse

A new way of storing and 'echoing' pulses of light has been discovered by a team from The Australian National University, allowing bursts of laser to work as a flexible optical memory and potentially assist in extending the range of quantum information systems.

Posted: Sep 10th, 2009

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Cement's basic molecular structure finally decoded

A MIT team found that the calcium-silica-hydrate in cement isn't really a crystal. It's a hybrid that shares some characteristics with crystalline structures and some with the amorphous structure of frozen liquids, such as glass or ice.

Posted: Sep 9th, 2009

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Calculations may improve temperature measures for microfluidics

If you wanted to know if your child had a fever or be certain that the roast in the oven was thoroughly cooked, you would, of course, use a thermometer that you trusted to give accurate readings at any temperature within its range. However, it isn't that simple for researchers who need to measure temperatures in microfluidic systems?tiny, channel-lined devices used in medical diagnostics, DNA forensics and lab-on-a-chip chemical analyzers?as their current 'thermometer' can only be precisely calibrated for one reference temperature.

Posted: Sep 9th, 2009

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Gunning for free electrons

The U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are collaborating to help define the most critical new technologies for the next generation of free electron lasers.

Posted: Sep 9th, 2009

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