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The latest news from academia, regulators
research labs and other things of interest

Simulations for better transparent oxide layers

Touchscreens and solar cells rely on special oxide layers. However, errors in the layers' atomic structure impair not only their transparency, but also their conductivity. Using atomic models, researchers have found ways of identifying and removing these errors.

Posted: Sep 1st, 2014

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Nanofluids could be the key to getting the most out of the sun

A promising capture method for concentrated solar power plants, called volumetric absorption, uses the material both to capture and transport concentrated solar energy. Nanofluids - suspensions of nanoparticles in fluids - have great potential as volumetric solar absorbers.

Posted: Aug 31st, 2014

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Scientists pioneer strategy for creating new materials

Researchers used X-ray scattering during a process called molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to observe the behavior of atoms as a type of material known as layered oxides were being formed. These observations were then used as data for computational predictions of new materials, leading to insights on how to best combine atoms to form new, stable structures.

Posted: Aug 29th, 2014

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Copper shines as flexible conductor

Bend them, stretch them, twist them, fold them: modern materials that are light, flexible and highly conductive have extraordinary technological potential, whether as artificial skin or electronic paper. Making such concepts affordable enough for general use remains a challenge but a new way of working with copper nanowires and a PVA 'nano glue' could be a game-changer.

Posted: Aug 29th, 2014

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Plug 'n' play protein crystals

Pauling's Rules describe the principles governing the structure of complex ionic crystals. These rules essentially describe how the arrangement of atoms in a crystal is critically dependent on the size of the atoms, their charge and type of bonding. According to scientists, similar rules can be applied to prepare ionic colloidal crystals consisting of oppositely charged proteins and virus particles.

Posted: Aug 29th, 2014

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